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  • asl1174
  • Adventurer

    • 60

    • April 05, 2012, 09:48:45 pm
    • Haenam, South Korea
My Afterschool and critical co-teacher
« on: November 27, 2012, 09:23:35 pm »
Every week I teach an afterschool class with about 12 kids in it ranging from grade four to grade six.  The english abilities are also rather varied.  About half are rather high level and the rest are average to low level.  Last semester my co-teacher was never in the room while I taught afterschool.  This semester she stays in the room and it's uncomfrotable but then again it's kind of her office so I have to room to ask her to leave.  Anyway I usually spend about 10 to 15 minutes introducing simple vocab of the lesson with a basic ppt.  Then I might have a ppt bomb game or an old school game such as bingo.  Then I follow that with another activity such as a craft or worksheets etc.  My co teacher told me that I shouldn't use ppts in afterschool because she thought they were boring for the kids. I can't read stories to them their English isn't high enough.  They groan and moan when I do craft or art projects with them so I tried to explain to her I really wans't sure what do do then.  She just giggled and said "I don't know..."  I was really pissed off because I know a bored kid when I see them and it's not that bad.  I usually don't spend more than 15 min on an instuctional ppt.  I wanted to say my peace with her and that this is my afterschool class and I feel my lessons are well put together.  But alas I need a good review so I can say so-long later on.  Any successful afterschool ideas and how do I deal with this catty woman.


  • Darkeru
  • Expert Waygook

    • 704

    • September 08, 2010, 01:03:17 pm
    • Seoul, South Korea
Re: My Afterschool and critical co-teacher
« Reply #1 on: November 28, 2012, 08:04:38 am »
Do you have any budget/resources?

I've a similar class (grade 3- 6) and I've done things like playing word games, playing board games, making board games and even cooking.
[In Korea once more - Working in Pyeongtaek]


  • chuck2657
  • Expert Waygook

    • 677

    • September 11, 2012, 02:29:12 pm
Re: My Afterschool and critical co-teacher
« Reply #2 on: November 28, 2012, 08:44:58 am »
Some Korean teachers seem to have an irrational hatred of PPTs.  I agree that they're probably overused, but they still seem like a solid way to introduce new vocabulary and phrases.  You can also use "flash cards" or simply just print off the PPTs and use those pictures instead.  It's the same thing, and probably not any better....but it might make your KT happy.

There's also lots of activities and games you can play without technology (charades, pictionary, running diction, board games/scrabble, work sheets, word finds, hang man, etc.)  Personally, I like to spend at least 10 minutes of verbal drilling/introduction for each lesson - otherwise I feel like students aren't learning new things to use during the activities.  It's probably a little boring for students, but you can use funny pictures, lots of movement, etc. to spice it up.  Also, I find it's important not to get them too excited during the first 20 minutes of class or so...their energy levels can get out of control.  Some people, however, seem to view after school a bit like a camp back home; the primary point is to have fun, and if they can use English during it all the better.


Re: My Afterschool and critical co-teacher
« Reply #3 on: November 28, 2012, 09:25:28 am »
My co teacher told me that I shouldn't use ppts in afterschool because she thought they were boring for the kids.

I'd have asked her why she thought that? Has she perhaps overheard kids making comments to that effect? She might actually be making a good point, so I'd give her the chance to justify what she says.

Alternatively, she might just be assuming kids find ppts boring because that's what she herself found when she tried using them. In that case, I'd ask her how she presented them and perhaps explain that the way you present them is different.

Personally, I find flashcards work better for introducing new language. The main reason is that I'm an old fart who started teaching before ppts existed, but I do also believe that they hold the students' attention better than the tv screen.

Incidentally, always bear in mind in these kind of situations that your co-t is not a native English speaker. Using the right words, tone of voice, deference to the listener and body language to deliver criticism or advice in the most appropriate way is actually a very high level of ability in a foreign language, and one that's beyond most Korean public school co-t's, even ones with semi-decent English. A lot of Koreans do come across as rude, abrupt or overly confrontational in these situations without either realising it or intending it.


  • Andyroo
  • Expert Waygook

    • 676

    • February 09, 2011, 12:49:41 pm
    • Korea
Re: My Afterschool and critical co-teacher
« Reply #4 on: November 28, 2012, 09:34:52 am »
How often did this criticism happen?
And was it actually a serious critique?

Honestly she just sounds like she opened her mouth without thinking it all the way through (she didn't have any suggestions what you can do just what you can't do).

Perhaps one kid one time called a game boring and she just told you.

Unjustified criticism wrankles but she probably hasn't given it a second though and by letting it eat away at you you might make an actual issue out of nothing (a throw away line on her part based on a whim).





Re: My Afterschool and critical co-teacher
« Reply #5 on: November 28, 2012, 12:10:26 pm »
When my co-teachers provide criticism, they definitely give me example. Since the teacher says change without telling how, this might be a SNIP moment, and you should just carry on.

I am not a teacher by trade, and if I stray from PPT for introduction to the lesson's topics, I can easily confuse myself and the students.


  • asl1174
  • Adventurer

    • 60

    • April 05, 2012, 09:48:45 pm
    • Haenam, South Korea
Re: My Afterschool and critical co-teacher
« Reply #6 on: November 28, 2012, 01:14:32 pm »
Thanks for the suggestions.  I was most irretated by the fact that she didn't have a better idea or anything constructive to add. I will ask her about a budget and hopefully if I do enough art with my kids they will stop complaining about it (they hate coloring and crafts) :)


  • fishead
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1138

    • April 23, 2010, 07:58:05 am
    • Yangju Korea
Re: My Afterschool and critical co-teacher
« Reply #7 on: November 28, 2012, 01:18:42 pm »
 PPT is generally used for drilling in Korea. It's a rather narrow use of the medium however it's  the general concensis. Bomb Games are considered new fall outside of that logic. When I tend too teach small groups I try to get away from a structured lesson plan for example( Present Practice Produce) or (Engage Study Activate). I just put students in small groups and give them worksheets. when they are finished I give them new worksheets. If the instructions on the worksheets are simple I just give them out let the students read the instructions and get on  with it.