Read 3188 times

  • namerae
  • Featured Contributor

    • 207

    • September 26, 2011, 09:38:41 am
    • Anyang, South Korea
Lesson 8: Symbols Around the World
« on: November 27, 2012, 04:48:16 pm »
This is a thread for any lesson material for Lee Suk Jae's Middle School English Grade 3 Lesson 8: Symbols Around the World. Please share your contributions here. Be sure to explain exactly what you are posting and please do not post multi-level materials in this thread. Also, any review lessons or materials should be posted in the review section for this grade. Best of luck in your lesson planning!


Re: Lesson 8: Symbols Around the World
« Reply #1 on: October 02, 2015, 03:08:50 pm »
As this lesson talks about various objects around the world that symbolize good luck or bad luck, I decided to incorporate superstitions in my warm-up and use it to help the students practice "I'm thinking of ___ing..." Here were the steps:

1. Introduce the topic of the lesson on p. 149. What does does the four leaf clover represent in many cultures?  This will be a segue into the PPT intro slide.
2. Show the PPT intro slide with the black cat.  Ask, "What is a superstition?"  In some cultures, black cats are good luck, in others they're bad luck.
3. Introduce the short YouTube animation short "Superstition." Before showing it ask the students to spot what they think the superstitions are. 
4. After the video, ask the students what superstitions they noticed and write their responses on the board.  Afterwards, show slides 2-8 to further explain the superstitions that were in the video. I wanted to make the lesson more multicultural instead of just doing a Korea vs. U.S.A. thing, so I showed the flags of various countries that have these superstitions.
5. Slide 9 will ask the students to think of superstitions in Korea. I gave each group a half sheet of paper and asked them to write down one good luck superstition in Korea and one bad luck superstition for a time frame of 3 minutes. Afterwards, I asked them to read their superstitions together to earn a team point. 
6. After sharing their superstitions and collecting their papers, I moved to slide 10 to introduce the key expression, "I'm thinking of __ing..." Check their understanding of the expression.
7. Slide 11 is a full sample sentence that incorporates the superstition theme.
8. Slide 12: Divide the class in half (A team, B team).  The A Team will read the "I'm thinking of__ing..." sentence at the top, while the B team will follow up with either, "That's a good idea. It's good luck," or "That's a bad idea. It's bad luck."  From slides 13-18 they will practice this. On slide 16, the A Team and B Team will switch their speaking roles for the remaining slides.
9. After they've practiced speaking, you can move on to the book. 

I will attach the PPT I used and the YouTube animation short.  This went really well and the students enjoyed the video and sharing superstitions in their culture.  When they did #3 on page 151, I had them add a fourth gift of their choice as they practiced the sample dialogue.  After practicing with their partner, they shared their role plays.  The students liked being able to make their own response instead of just using what was in the book. It was also educational for me. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cZPMe2efsDA



Re: Lesson 8: Symbols Around the World
« Reply #2 on: October 26, 2015, 09:32:52 am »
Here's Lesson #8. Unlike most lessons I've uploaded where each is split into Part A + B, this lessons is just one part. I lifted the vast majority from JHarris and a few slides at the end from Celestial. Thanks guys!

About the only changes I made to the slides are: added some alternate expressions, added some photos, embedded the video, and  corrected some typos. So to call this my lesson is a stretch...

._.;


Re: Lesson 8: Symbols Around the World
« Reply #3 on: October 23, 2016, 08:32:38 pm »
Hey guys! So for this lesson I figured doing a day of superstitions could be cool.
This was largely taken from another person on waygook but their's was way too religious for me and they used very advanced language so here's a superstition lesson and bomb game without religion and easy-to-understand word (hopefully) :evil:


  • nbb
  • Adventurer

    • 26

    • August 27, 2015, 09:47:20 pm
    • UK
Re: Lesson 8: Symbols Around the World
« Reply #4 on: December 20, 2016, 08:29:46 am »
I've adapted some of the material already on here so thanks to to the contributors!

Part 1 - match the symbols to the meanings worksheet / introduction to vocab / textbook listen & speak /  dialog vocabulary and arrange the sentences activity

Part 2 - superstitions quiz / review / review dialog vocab / dialog game part 2 = running dictation (set a timer) / team guessing game

The only attachment I haven't included is the missing sentences to stick around the room - I mustn't have saved the document!

2017 update *bottom 2 ppts*
Part 1 - warm up worksheet switched out for ppt equivalent. Moved the team guessing game to lesson 1

part 2 - class quiz warm up added for their rewards system - guess popular symbols - this is set to last a good chunk of the lesson so you may want to reduce it or move it to the end of the lesson to suit your class. There's a good chance i'll move it to the end, depending on the class.
« Last Edit: September 05, 2017, 12:22:24 pm by nbb »


Re: Lesson 8: Symbols Around the World
« Reply #5 on: October 07, 2019, 10:24:33 am »
Spinning Symbols Game: Students watch the three similar yet different logos of well-known brands spin as they try to decide which one is the exact match of the non-spinning logo presented. Students should write down the numbers 1, 2 or 3 as well as the name of the brand. Works well with groups and have them write down the answers on whiteboards. Groups who respond/write quicker correctly earn more points. The first few slides' logos spin slowly to make it easier. The remaining slides' logos spin quickly to make the game more challenging/fun.

I Keep trying to post the ppt game as an attachment, but keep getting a message saying "permission denied". Anyone know why?
« Last Edit: October 08, 2019, 11:06:59 am by beckiusjohn »