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  • Redondo
  • Expert Waygook

    • 642

    • October 14, 2012, 05:28:11 am
    • toronto
Tesol certification
« on: November 10, 2012, 12:06:42 am »
Sorry in advance if this doesn't belong in this board, but I checked the forum and I can't find a board that this would be more relevant to.

I heard that Korea doesn't care with TEFL course you take. Does that mean I should go with the cheapest one?

Needless to say I'm on a budget, and the cheaper it is the better. There is this groupon deal that gets you a TEFL certificate for $70, and is like 85% discount. I don't believe that anyone buys this course without the discount, but the end result is that it's cheaper than anywhere else. It's not certified by any regulatory body, but I don't believe the ITTT course is either. The ITT one is cheap too, but since it doesn't offer anything more why would i plunk down the extra cash?

Is it going to hurt me to take the cheap one? here is the link for the groupon deal http://www.groupon.com/deals/g1mm-tesol-express-toronto?pt=aUJ0m7zAAAAATF8-lYtdo2GuTBXzyE548
and for the course: http://www.tesolexpressonline.com/coursedetail/TESOL_120_Advanced_Certificate
and ITTT's course:

The only issue i see with the Tesol Express one is that the deal doesn't check out, in which case Groupon will give me a refund for it.


  • Morticae
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1400

    • August 31, 2010, 12:45:33 pm
Re: Tesol certification
« Reply #1 on: November 10, 2012, 12:11:04 am »
That should be accepted fine in Korea.


  • Jaunter
  • Super Waygook

    • 431

    • April 02, 2012, 11:57:17 am
    • Goyang, Korea
    more
Re: Tesol certification
« Reply #2 on: November 10, 2012, 07:48:38 am »
Before you buy you should check out this discussion about that same TESOL course, it seems there may be an issue about getting the discount! http://www.waygook.org/index.php?topic=29578.0
_ゝ`) ...


  • Redondo
  • Expert Waygook

    • 642

    • October 14, 2012, 05:28:11 am
    • toronto
Re: Tesol certification
« Reply #3 on: November 10, 2012, 02:19:53 pm »
Hm, tough call. it seems one person managed to redeem it OK, and one person not. I'll do some more research online. Even if it takes weeks for them to get back to me I might be OK....after all, I only need the certificate when I'm in Korea.


Re: Tesol certification
« Reply #4 on: November 10, 2012, 09:02:48 pm »
Some like in-class time, like observations of classrooms or actual time spent teaching TESOL lessons to students from other countries.  You never know when a school will decide to get picky about your TESOL certificate, so you should take the route that you know will get you the farthest for the least amount of money.  That's what I did when I had my TESOL course back in the states, although I'd never recommend that anyone have to deal with the administration at my school (despite the stellar course offerings).


  • Redondo
  • Expert Waygook

    • 642

    • October 14, 2012, 05:28:11 am
    • toronto
Re: Tesol certification
« Reply #5 on: November 24, 2012, 12:59:41 pm »
I'm thinking of pulling the trigger on this. It's probably the worst course I can take, but what matters is I pay the least amount of money for the certificate. I can't afford a $1000 dollar class, and I'm not sure I want to pay $300 for a different online certification.

It doesn't seem that schools will have a problem with it, but I hope I can get more opinions.


  • VanIslander
  • Moderator LVL 1

    • 1484

    • June 02, 2011, 10:12:19 am
    • Seogwipo, Jeju Island
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Re: Tesol certification
« Reply #6 on: November 24, 2012, 01:13:37 pm »
The cheapest one?  >:(

I've met many who have taken the CELTA and like me they have have NOT regretted it! It actually helps, isn't just a rubber stamping go-through-the-motions kind of certification.

Get the CELTA. You will not regret it.

Sincerely,
CELTA Grad Jan. '05 Auckland


  • Jrong
  • The Legend

    • 2381

    • April 28, 2011, 12:52:32 pm
    more
Re: Tesol certification
« Reply #7 on: November 24, 2012, 10:30:42 pm »
Trog has a point. ^ Get the CELTA or get...creative...
"When in doubt...ask Troglodyte" ~0mnslnd


  • JeremyC
  • Featured Contributor

    • 2322

    • July 15, 2012, 03:48:16 pm
    • Korea
Re: Tesol certification
« Reply #8 on: November 25, 2012, 12:12:45 am »
Another issue is which certificate you have may be scrutinized by a recruiter or, more likely, an employer. If it was me I'd prefer a teacher with a certificate from a course that was more thorough and had a better reputation.

But that's just me; if I were an employer I'd always make sure my staff were paid on time, address difficulties with their apartment at the earliest opportunity, let them know they were able to speak to me freely about any problems with students, try to assist and develop their teaching as best I could.

Knowing I'd taken on someone who'd done their research and completed a good TEFL course would make all of that much easier.
It's nice to be important but more important to be nice.


  • Morticae
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1400

    • August 31, 2010, 12:45:33 pm
Re: Tesol certification
« Reply #9 on: November 25, 2012, 09:16:54 pm »
Hmm... if people are wanting doors opened, not much is going to beat an actual teaching license in ESL from your home country.


  • Redondo
  • Expert Waygook

    • 642

    • October 14, 2012, 05:28:11 am
    • toronto
Re: Tesol certification
« Reply #10 on: November 30, 2012, 10:56:25 pm »
So back to the original topic, what do people think of the ITT teflonline.net TEFL 120 hour course. Should I go for that one? it's $300 dollars and looks like I may learn something from it.

I can probably pay up to twice that much, but it's really only worth it if there is 20 hours in class. speaking of that, is there a problem if I do an online course with no in-class? Will EPIK get picky when I go to Korea?


  • mycena
  • Veteran

    • 193

    • May 08, 2011, 10:59:19 am
    • Masan
Re: Tesol certification
« Reply #11 on: December 01, 2012, 08:22:51 am »
I just finished the 120 hour ITTT course and I felt like it was worth the money. You get out of it what you put in. The standards for written assignments depend on who your tutor is, but mine demanded a lot in terms of writing quality and content of answers. The grammar units and activity ideas were especially helpful.

Here's the review I wrote: http://www.wandergeeks.com/ittt-tefl-course-review/


Re: Tesol certification
« Reply #12 on: December 01, 2012, 10:43:11 am »
I feel that I've seen you on Dave's some while back, so I know you can't be that new. That's why it baffles me as to why you're trying to debate this. I'm not talking about Korea. Korea is average in terms of ESL job quality, it's just popular because anybody can get a job easily. Anybody with a bachelors degree can get any job in Korea, outside of an international school.

But, speaking of international schools and public schools in several countries, a CELTA isn't going to cut it. Take a look at the public primary/secondary school jobs in the middle east. Jobs that are often 2x+ more profitable than Korea. What is the norm qualification there? Here's a cut and paste:

"Qualified teacher status/certified teacher (licensed to teach primary level in home state/province)"

That's all I really have to say. Can you go back to America with a CELTA and try to teach at a government public school? No, you can't. Is a CELTA good, and does it have its purposes? Absolutely, it's great. If people aren't sure about their career choice and want to dabble in EFL, then a TEFL or CELTA is a good call.

But, since this thread seemed to be discussing ways to "open doors," it is downright foolish to ignore the obvious credential. For those who are interested (obviously not Troglodyte), check out getting licensed in your home country. In America, each state has their own license and steps to obtaining a license. Some people may only need to take a fairly simple test or two to get their license. If it's too difficult, and you're not interested in doing it, then don't do it. But it's one option available, and I refuse to let it be discredited in this thread.


Um, sorry, but there's a bit of nonsense in here.

1) A CELTA or proper, in-house TESOL absolutely opens doors for teaching abroad, particularly when combined with teaching experience. First off, you can get gigs in the middle east with a CELTA and a couple of years of experience (I know people in Korea who are going there when they finish who already have jobs). Also, the middle east is one of the pickiest places about qualification-- if it weren't, half of us would already be there. A proper CELTA/TESOL opens tons of doors for language institutes (International House, etc.) all over Asia and Latin America, and generally makes you a more respectable looking candidate for any job.

Granted, you're right, it's not gonna fly with international schools or public schools in most countries, but that's an entirely different class of job for people who have put in an entirely different class of work. OP isn't sure that he wants to commit to an online TEFL course-- your response is that it'd be better if he got a full-on Ed. degree?

2) You can teach at home in the US with a CELTA. Your assertion that you can't is like saying the only way for a Korean to teach in a Korean public school is to pass the national teacher's exam-- it just ain't true. ESL teachers are in demand all over the US and schools are at the point of hiring people who have classroom experience and a CELTA and then trying to get them into a program where they get a master's/official teaching credential. My next-door neighbor in the US has been teaching spanish and chinese for over 10 years, and actually speaks English as a second language. The woman has a PhD in education. She applied for an ESL job in Massachusetts and they told her that despite her experience, it just wouldn't be workable, because she didn't have a CELTA/TESOL and that's the base (lowest possible) qualification for ESL. She told my mother that when I came home, I could more-or-less look around anywhere in the state (and probably in most of the country) and get a job with relatively no trouble. That's obviously anecdotal, and MA is one of the states where you can get a test-based temp. license, but the lady knows her field pretty well.


  • Redondo
  • Expert Waygook

    • 642

    • October 14, 2012, 05:28:11 am
    • toronto
Re: Tesol certification
« Reply #13 on: December 01, 2012, 11:46:42 am »
I just finished the 120 hour ITTT course and I felt like it was worth the money. You get out of it what you put in. The standards for written assignments depend on who your tutor is, but mine demanded a lot in terms of writing quality and content of answers. The grammar units and activity ideas were especially helpful.

Here's the review I wrote: http://www.wandergeeks.com/ittt-tefl-course-review/

Nice.

I finally settled on something and paid for the 100 hours certificate. There really needs to be something in the middle because it was either paying $170 for that or $1000 for an in-class one. I can always upgrade to 120 hours if I find it necessary, but I'm mostly just doing it for the certificate.