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  • Daeguer
  • Adventurer

    • 50

    • February 28, 2012, 10:33:18 pm
    • Daegu
Do some teachers just have it worse than others?
« on: August 21, 2012, 11:57:29 am »
Let me say first that I know that I don't have it worst.  I've heard that many teachers are swamped.

I work 21 hours a week which include 3 after school classes.  After school classes are basically new lessons every week and sometimes every day without a co teacher.

I'm frustrated because my co teachers, for the most part, haven't liked what I've done.  They don't like "pass the ball' which seems to be a favorite on here.  Many of my lessons have been adapted or directly taken from the threads on Waygook, and I wonder why they can work for other teachers but not my school? 

I'm just tired of being told they aren't good enough.  "Your focus is on writing and speaking," that's what I was told last semester.  Today, "Your focus is on speaking."  My reply, "writing too, right?"  "No, like I told you, just speaking."  It's miscommunicaton crap like that that is annoying me.

I guess I'm frustrated b/c i know teacher who literally teach 7 hours less than me, or only have to plan 1 lesson a week, where I do up to 5. 

I think only teachers who have many after school classes, with no co teacher,  can relate.

Some words of wisdom and encouragement would be greatly appreciated.  I think I'm going home after this semester.


  • Daeguer
  • Adventurer

    • 50

    • February 28, 2012, 10:33:18 pm
    • Daegu
Re: Do some teachers just have it worse than others?
« Reply #1 on: August 21, 2012, 12:02:59 pm »
Should have proof read...

"... have it worse than others."


  • lotte world
  • The Legend

    • 2272

    • August 22, 2011, 09:00:38 pm
    more
Re: Do some teachers just have it worse than others?
« Reply #2 on: August 21, 2012, 12:07:48 pm »
Yes, they do.

And it's really hard to know what is expected of us, when no-one really explains it.

Some (foreign) teachers have a hard time because they aren't too bright, or they are unpleasant people.  They make their own problems.  Others simply because of their situation.

If you want some encouraging words- many teachers change schools in March, at the beginning of the new semester.  Whoever is giving you a hard time now may simply vanish!


Re: Do some teachers just have it worse than others?
« Reply #3 on: August 21, 2012, 12:12:48 pm »
OP, sorry to hear you aren't the happiest.  I think it depends on the mentality of yourself.  I am not a teacher nor ever will be.  So when a co-teacher gives me advice, I do try to impliment it, but I do not stress myself out over it.  Unfortunately, I am playing the same games but the teachers don't usually give any feedback.  Again, that portion is on you to figure out.

And something that is pretty much a fact, you have job secuirty to some extent.  If you arrive on time and your principal is not the one out to get you, you are okay.  The resources, time, and hassel of changes teachers is too great for the MOE.



  • Chicagohotdog
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1052

    • March 04, 2012, 12:25:31 pm
    • Gyeongsangbuk-do
    more
Re: Do some teachers just have it worse than others?
« Reply #4 on: August 21, 2012, 12:18:56 pm »
I have to plan and teach 13-18 seperate lessons a week (depending on if the teacher classes are a go or not...usually a not).  I have experience with this kind of workload though (25 LPs a week when I was teaching in the states), but I can see where someone who came here with just a TEFL instead of a teaching background could be going a little crazy. 

The only ones that I really have problems with are the high school classes where the co-teacher literally says "Good morning" and nothing else.  It's hard to guage what he wants and usually I just try to ignore his presence in the room as he does little more than stalk the back and pace.

I wouldn't necessarily say that I have it bad.  My main KT and another one at another school are great and really make working there interesting and try to help me make better lessons for my students.

I will say though - I am rather envious of those people who have like 2 lesson plans a week and just have to differentiate between classes.  I may not teach as much as them but I spend a lot of time planning and creating materials and do a lot of work at home as well becuase there just isn't enough time in the day to get it all accomplished in school (and due to bus schedules I really can't stay late there or I'll be stuck without a ride). 

I will probably try and switch schools next year though - I am just not a small town type.


Cheer up though - I have heard some real horror stories from some people who are in the same intake as me and If I had been them I would have done a midnight-run just based on how the schools are treating them - your situation just seems kind of annoying rather than truely awful.
« Last Edit: August 21, 2012, 12:21:31 pm by Chicagohotdog »
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  • Mattaru
  • Veteran

    • 151

    • April 26, 2012, 03:29:10 pm
    • Yeongam
Re: Do some teachers just have it worse than others?
« Reply #5 on: August 21, 2012, 12:30:01 pm »
I only teach 10 hours a week, Middle School (6) and High School (4).
I also teach 3 extra classes during school hours. My co-teacher insisted on paying me for those.
On top of everything else, I've been given a very, very good apartment.

In conclusion: Yes, everyone has it worse than me.
(sorry)
My first day I watched a few lessons and had my first class which was a Grade 2 class or something like that. I thought every things was great until a kid ddong-chimmed me. 


  • mystic951
  • Veteran

    • 117

    • August 27, 2011, 01:44:06 pm
    • Gimcheon-si
Re: Do some teachers just have it worse than others?
« Reply #6 on: August 21, 2012, 12:34:36 pm »
yea man, some have it worse than others. Even in the States teaching isn't all apples and summer vacation time off.

I teach 4 schools, 2 middle schools and 2 ele., at only one of those schools do i have a co-teacher who is in the room with me. The other 3 there aren't enough teachers so the classes are split. Half goes with their teacher, half comes with me for English. I teach 4 after school classes a week and don't have a co-teacher present.

The bottom line is, the first 3 months working like this wasn't stressful and demoralizing. But, you just gotta breathe. I fleshed out a new rules system, stopped doing games/activities that didn't work or that my teachers didn't agree with and i've gotten into a nice routine that works out well.

This is the life of a teacher mate, sometimes its clear sailing sometimes its "OMFG, I HAVE NOTHING PLANNED FOR THIS CLASS! QUICK, TO WAYGOOK!"

Hope that helps :),
Cheers


Re: Do some teachers just have it worse than others?
« Reply #7 on: August 21, 2012, 12:35:57 pm »
OP: "I guess I'm frustrated b/c i know teacher who literally teach 7 hours less than me, or only have to plan 1 lesson a week, where I do up to 5.

I think only teachers who have many after school classes, with no co teacher,  can relate.

Some words of wisdom and encouragement would be greatly appreciated.  I think I'm going home after this semester."

 ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Sounds like they are asking you to work hard. Perhaps you can consider that what you will take from your time here will be more educational and helpful to you in the future than the experince of your friends only doing a few classes a week.

I taught back in the UK and in NZ for a number of years. My first after school classes were a nightmare. I started to take it really personally because each class was designed just for my after school class and I thought I would only use it once. Since then I have gone back to those materials time and time again with a different class who aren't end-of-the-day-tired and most of the classes have gone better.

Your second year will be easier (your bank of resources will grow, confidence is up on what should work etc) and hopefully your unhelpful CT will disappear or you will both find a way of discussing and planning together so you can hear feedback during lesson design process rather than after the lesson.

If you leave after one year that hasn't gone so well, you may always wonder if with different circumstances it would have been a much better experince.

I suggest you stay.

FIGHTING!!!!!   


Re: Do some teachers just have it worse than others?
« Reply #8 on: August 21, 2012, 12:44:06 pm »
Last semester I taught 34+ hours a week. 22 regular and 12 after school classes. I did all my lesson planing during my lunch break (because it was basically my only break). It wasn't bad really. I absolutely loath being bored. Near the end of it though I was getting pretty exhausted. It might be nice to have a lighter class load this semester. I will find out in the next week or two how many after school classes I will need to teach.

Good luck!   


  • Ardepark
  • Waygookin

    • 12

    • October 11, 2011, 09:13:26 am
    • Anyang, South Korea
Re: Do some teachers just have it worse than others?
« Reply #9 on: August 21, 2012, 12:47:00 pm »
Yes, some just have it worse.  I may have it a LITTLE better than you.  I don't have 3 after-school classes a week regularly.  BUT I have after-school classes scheduled throughout the year that are not organized in accordance with each other so there are sometimes weeks where I do teach 2 or 3 just because that's how the cookie crumbled.

Like you, I have gone through periods of intense frustration over there being no discernible method to much of the madness, and how the only feedback I usually get is "You should have done this differently," if I get any at all.  Not understanding the expectations placed upon me, not seeing my own expectations being met, lies, etc. 

My first year was the worst, as you can assume.  I'm on my 3rd year and now I know that it was compounded by the fact that 2 of my co-teachers that year happened to be spoiled, bratty, entitled bitches.  No apologies for calling them that.  I now know that many Korean teachers who wind up at middle schools have never taught at one, and are upset and shocked because they didn't realize it wasn't peaches and cream, and are just as surprised to discover this as we are.  For instance, we have a new teacher right now who only ever taught at elementary school, and I just get tickled to death when she gets dumbfounded over the same questions I did: "What?  Why is the schedule all of a sudden changed?"  "Why are the 3rd-grade students so MEAN?"  "Why wasn't I told about this?  Why can't anyone tell me what's going on?"  Some of them are mature adults and deal with it effectively on their own, but some of them have been treated like princesses all their lives, and they are NOT AMUSED at being slapped around by life for the first time, and they take it out on whoever is weaker than them--and on your first year, that's YOU.  Maybe you have someone like that.  And lotte world is correct: they usually leave.  But it has been worth it to me to stay and figure things out, slowly but surely.  Experience is the hardest and best way to learn.     

Hey, call a spade a spade.  There ARE some ridiculous problems at some of these schools and everyone pretends they aren't there; there is little to nothing you can do about it except suck it up; and anger and frustration are the appropriate responses in such a situation.  But I agree with wpeaky.  It gets better and better the longer you stay; you build up an archive of material that you can apply quickly and improvise with because you know it well; you have more money; you have learned more of the language; and you build confidence in dealing with life in general.

No shame in quitting, no smug in staying.  That's my honest opinion.  Good luck!


  • Morticae
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1400

    • August 31, 2010, 12:45:33 pm
Re: Do some teachers just have it worse than others?
« Reply #10 on: August 24, 2012, 01:15:50 pm »
Stop listening to your CT. If they tell you that your lesson was bad, apologize and tell them you will fix it next week. Then continue on as normal. Stop putting so much "weight" into their opinion.


  • schuettl
  • Adventurer

    • 40

    • October 27, 2010, 08:51:09 am
    • Wonju, Gangwon-do
Re: Do some teachers just have it worse than others?
« Reply #11 on: August 24, 2012, 02:48:27 pm »
I teach 22 classes a week and they all need different plans.  6 of those classes are after school classes with no KT and 5 more I teach without any assistance either. 

Its obvious that many people use the materials on Waygook.org for their classes and I am sure their are vastly varying degrees of success with them.  I know that when other teachers in my area have struggled, they can have another foreigner teacher come in an observe their class and give pointers and whatnot.  You can go to the district coordinator for you area (or just give a call or email) and explain the situation.  They can set an observation up for you.  The benefits of this are that you would get a more objective - or even sympathetic point of view from someone who's really a peer.  That person has no reason to get you in trouble or give unwarranted criticism.  They can give you another opinion and either tell you to ignore the bullshit or really help you improve with some things in your classroom.  It won't hurt.. only help.  Give yourself peace of mind one way or the other by allowing another foreigner to watch you teach.


  • NYoung
  • Waygookin

    • 10

    • October 04, 2010, 07:42:59 am
    • Cheongju, South Korea
Re: Do some teachers just have it worse than others?
« Reply #12 on: August 24, 2012, 03:15:06 pm »
Your schedule itself actually sounds average. There are a lot of people with much heavier workloads. However, someone with the lightest workload can still feel immense pressure if there is a negative working environment. I suggest you take the time to create a well structured lesson plan (With notes on why you are using each activity and what the students gain from it) Then politely ask your co-teacher if she will take the time to look it over with you. If there are any activities she wants you to change then just go with it. Donít fight against it and donít just nod your head and carry on doing the same thing. They will see that you havenít listened and it will make the situation worse.

 A lot of Korean teachers don't like waygook.org because they feel it makes foreign teachers lazy. Sometimes people just come in to school in the morning, go on the internet and grab their lessons for the day. Your co-worker wants to see that you have put time and effort into creating a solid lesson.

Once you have had the first meeting, ask if you can make this a weekly meeting. You can use the time to see what she is teaching in other lesson, you can build relations and you can find out what she wants from you. Bring some snacks and drinks to your meetings, biscuits and tea always work. Donít just ask him/her about work ask them about their weekend. Try a little Korean with them and if you do those three things I promise they will start to react more politely to you.

Personally I agree with your co-teacher, pass the ball isn't really a good use of time. If not supervised the children can become overzealous and you only have one child speaking every so often while the other children are doing nothing. Using songs with actions would be a better warm up (Elementary school that is. If youíre middle school I would leave out the actions). That way all the students are actively involved and speaking.

Sometimes we get a co-worker who has resentment towards us. Try to be sympathetic to them though, often they get paid the same as us but do a hell of a lot more work. Imagine you are working in your home country and you are put in charge of someone who doesn't speak English, and they don't seem to be putting in much effort into learning the language. You then have to do all the paper work for them. You can imagine that itís a little frustrating for some.

After all that if you still have problems, you can plow through it in the knowledge that you tried your best and hope you will get a new English teacher at the end of semester. Something that helps me if I have stress at work is to make sure I completely disconnect from it as soon as youíre out of the door.

I hope even a part of this is helpful. Good luck and keep on truckiní  :D


  • Morticae
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1400

    • August 31, 2010, 12:45:33 pm
Re: Do some teachers just have it worse than others?
« Reply #13 on: August 25, 2012, 10:36:03 am »

Sometimes we get a co-worker who has resentment towards us. Try to be sympathetic to them though, often they get paid the same as us but do a hell of a lot more work. Imagine you are working in your home country and you are put in charge of someone who doesn't speak English, and they don't seem to be putting in much effort into learning the language. You then have to do all the paper work for them. You can imagine that itís a little frustrating for some.


The 'burden' or 'work load' associated with managing a NET is exaggerated. I'm close with mine (similar age), and we've talked about this. As she said, the most she really has to do is forward me some information from the MOE occasionally. But I already know the information before she even gives it to me, because it's posted online. Also, help me out if I need it. But I never ask for help, with exception to logging my vacation days. So, a couple hours a year. She doesn't even tell me about special schedules, I can see it all for myself on Cool Messenger. Use Google translate so you can get the gist of it.

Let's not act like we're some big burden for our CT's. It's completely the opposite. If I was not at school, my CT's would have to pick up the slack to the tune of 5-6 teaching hours more per week. Currently, they have that as free time because of me. So, it's quite the opposite-- I am a relief to them, and they express this attitude to me.

As for lesson planning, it is a waste of time and I do not do it. My school only asked me to do it during my first 6 months. Once they recognized that I came prepared, they stopped asking for it. Now I don't notify anybody about any content or plans related to my teaching. I don't need to write some nonsense down on a paper, because I'm not going to follow it. Each class is different and I need to remain flexible. Only during fake open classes do you see lesson plans, which often includes scripted dialogue the teacher will say! It's a big joke, really. My CT's never do lesson plans either, with exception to open classes.

So, anyway. My "gig" is pretty good. I'm in my 3rd year and have survived several staff and administration changes. Unfortunately, attitudes change across the board so all situations are different. But I really dislike seeing the comments that we are a burden or time-sink for our co-workers.


  • ganstar
  • Veteran

    • 149

    • November 06, 2009, 02:16:52 pm
    • busan
Re: Do some teachers just have it worse than others?
« Reply #14 on: August 26, 2012, 09:14:39 am »
I do the same amount of planning as you, though use to do up to 13 plans a week at another job.

You say your classes that you have adapted off here, have not been well received. I was in the same situation. My head co, who is an expert teacher, hates pass the ball. I had never used this activity with her and did not know her opinion until I actually did it. The reason is students just don't speak enough. She said what is the point of that, just to have fun. So after the first period she said we had better just skip that and they can go to the English library and read books. Of course I felt just great. I apologised and she said that's the difference between Korean teachers and NETs (read you are not a real teacher and not very good anyway). Though I do agree with her that they don't speak a great deal during this activity. So that's fine I will never do it again in our class again. On the flip side my other co doesn't mind this activity.

The most common game activity 'planned' and uploaded on here, PPT games, and not allowed by either co so they are out. Again they don't speak enough and students are waiting too long for their turn. So with PPT games out, that doesn't leave a lot of extra material to adapt or use straight up.

So what I have done is use the book activities where possible,adapt and try to make them better. Though I don't use a lot of them. The best thing for me is board games.  Adapt those to the content. You can PM me and I can send you a few to look at and then you can use them as you please. The originals, or the ideas are off here and I made them from scratch. You can rotate them every few lessons.

You say there is a bit of miscommunication. Once you have decided what you will do, but BEFORE you prepare it, could you run it by your cos for approval. Do this before as you would preparing all over again.

For your after class do they give you any materials to use, or do you make it all from scratch? I believe you would have some budget, maybe 200,000 for school materials. Why not buy a book and use that? Just copy the pages the student s will use for the day and they can make a file.
« Last Edit: August 31, 2012, 08:15:25 pm by ganstar »


  • bawaugh
  • Super Waygook

    • 497

    • March 04, 2012, 08:49:30 pm
    • Geoje
    more
Re: Do some teachers just have it worse than others?
« Reply #15 on: August 26, 2012, 09:49:52 am »
I do the same amount of planning as you, though use to do up to 13 plans a week at another job.

You say your classes that you have adapted off here, have not been well received. I was in the same situation. My head co, who is an expert teacher, hates pass the ball. I had never used this activity with her and did not know her opinion until I actually did it. The reason is students just don't speak enough. She said what is the point of that, just to have fun. So after the first period she said we had better just skip that and they can go to the English library and read books. Of course I felt just great. I apologised and she said that's the difference between Korean teachers and NETs (read you are not a real teacher and not very good anyway). Though I do agree with her that they don't speak a great deal during this activity. So that's fine I will never do it again in our class again. On the flip side my other co doesn't mind this activity.

The most common game activity 'planned' and uploaded on here, PPT games, and not allowed by either co so they are out. Again they don't speak enough and students are waiting too long for their turn. So with PPT games out, that doesn't leave a lot of extra material to adapt or use straight up.

So what I have done is use the book activities where possible,adapt and try to make them better. Though I don't use a lot of them. The best thing for me is board games.  Adapt those to the content. You can PM me and I can send you a few to look at and then you can use them as you please. The originals, or the ideas are off here and I made them from scratch. You can rotate them every few lessons.

You say there is a bit of miscommunication. Once you have decided what you will do, but BEFORE you prepare it, could you run it by your cos for approval. Do this before as you would preparing all over again.

For your after class do they give you any materials to use, or do you make it all from scratch? I believe you would have some budget, maybe 200,000 for school materials. Why not buy a book and use that? Just copy the pages the student s will use for the day and they can make a file.


My co teacher is the same she does not like power point games. And I can see her point. The reality is the more student talking time the more they will remember.


But my co has no problem with pass the ball. I don't know how your class does it, but When I play it have students in groups, each group has their own ball. The student with the ball stands up, and reads part A, then the group will read part b. I think it gets a good amount of speaking time, and everyone is talking. As an aside I always get them to change how they pass the ball each time, ads a bit of fun to the game.


As for me I plan 1 x 4th grade lesson and 1 x 6th grade lesson, and use each with 2 different co teachers. I then plan 2x Advanced class lessons (in the same period) and 2 x 3/4 grade lessons in different periods + one adult class. I like planning the lessons with co-teachers because I have a curriculum to follow and their help in class if something goes wrong.
PV=nRT

Where
P is pressure
V is volume
n is number of moles
R is the gas constant
T is the temperature


  • ganstar
  • Veteran

    • 149

    • November 06, 2009, 02:16:52 pm
    • busan
Re: Do some teachers just have it worse than others?
« Reply #16 on: August 26, 2012, 09:58:37 am »
I do the same amount of planning as you, though use to do up to 13 plans a week at another job.

You say your classes that you have adapted off here, have not been well received. I was in the same situation. My head co, who is an expert teacher, hates pass the ball. I had never used this activity with her and did not know her opinion until I actually did it. The reason is students just don't speak enough. She said what is the point of that, just to have fun. So after the first period she said we had better just skip that and they can go to the English library and read books. Of course I felt just great. I apologised and she said that's the difference between Korean teachers and NETs (read you are not a real teacher and not very good anyway). Though I do agree with her that they don't speak a great deal during this activity. So that's fine I will never do it again in our class again. On the flip side my other co doesn't mind this activity.

The most common game activity 'planned' and uploaded on here, PPT games, and not allowed by either co so they are out. Again they don't speak enough and students are waiting too long for their turn. So with PPT games out, that doesn't leave a lot of extra material to adapt or use straight up.

So what I have done is use the book activities where possible,adapt and try to make them better. Though I don't use a lot of them. The best thing for me is board games.  Adapt those to the content. You can PM me and I can send you a few to look at and then you can use them as you please. The originals, or the ideas are off here and I made them from scratch. You can rotate them every few lessons.

You say there is a bit of miscommunication. Once you have decided what you will do, but BEFORE you prepare it, could you run it by your cos for approval. Do this before as you would preparing all over again.

For your after class do they give you any materials to use, or do you make it all from scratch? I believe you would have some budget, maybe 200,000 for school materials. Why not buy a book and use that? Just copy the pages the student s will use for the day and they can make a file.


My co teacher is the same she does not like power point games. And I can see her point. The reality is the more student talking time the more they will remember.


But my co has no problem with pass the ball. I don't know how your class does it, but When I play it have students in groups, each group has their own ball. The student with the ball stands up, and reads part A, then the group will read part b. I think it gets a good amount of speaking time, and everyone is talking. As an aside I always get them to change how they pass the ball each time, ads a bit of fun to the game.


As for me I plan 1 x 4th grade lesson and 1 x 6th grade lesson, and use each with 2 different co teachers. I then plan 2x Advanced class lessons (in the same period) and 2 x 3/4 grade lessons in different periods + one adult class. I like planning the lessons with co-teachers because I have a curriculum to follow and their help in class if something goes wrong.

The day I did it with expert co I had three larger groups with their own ball. They are seated in three rows of pairs. Perhaps that was too big.

I did it this week with the co who is ok with it, had 6 small groups with their own ball. So yes, I do it like you.


  • bawaugh
  • Super Waygook

    • 497

    • March 04, 2012, 08:49:30 pm
    • Geoje
    more
Re: Do some teachers just have it worse than others?
« Reply #17 on: August 26, 2012, 10:13:32 am »
Ganstar,


Interesting, Maybe the smaller groups helped. Still you are playing music for 30-40 seconds while the ball is going around, so maybe the co teacher feels that is 30 seconds of more speaking time is being lost. Perhaps you could get the class to sing an English song while they pass the ball? There should be a few good you tube clips they could learn (I should note I have never tried this but maybe I should try it with my 6th grade?).



PV=nRT

Where
P is pressure
V is volume
n is number of moles
R is the gas constant
T is the temperature


  • Cereal
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1239

    • March 16, 2011, 12:51:55 pm
    • Earth
    more
Re: Do some teachers just have it worse than others?
« Reply #18 on: August 30, 2012, 12:01:51 pm »
Let me say first that I know that I don't have it worst.  I've heard that many teachers are swamped.

I work 21 hours a week which include 3 after school classes.  After school classes are basically new lessons every week and sometimes every day without a co teacher.

I'm frustrated because my co teachers, for the most part, haven't liked what I've done.  They don't like "pass the ball' which seems to be a favorite on here.  Many of my lessons have been adapted or directly taken from the threads on Waygook, and I wonder why they can work for other teachers but not my school? 

I'm just tired of being told they aren't good enough.  "Your focus is on writing and speaking," that's what I was told last semester.  Today, "Your focus is on speaking."  My reply, "writing too, right?"  "No, like I told you, just speaking."  It's miscommunicaton crap like that that is annoying me.

I guess I'm frustrated b/c i know teacher who literally teach 7 hours less than me, or only have to plan 1 lesson a week, where I do up to 5. 

I think only teachers who have many after school classes, with no co teacher,  can relate.

Some words of wisdom and encouragement would be greatly appreciated.  I think I'm going home after this semester.

Even if you're teaching the whole 21 hours, that's still only 4.2 hours a day. 5 is the norm. 6 is common. Other than at university jobs, I don't know anyone who's teaching only 14 hours per week.

And having to plan 5 lessons? Wow! You really don't realize how much you lucked out with your current job.

I teach at 3 public schools: 1 middle, 2 elementary. I have a total of 16 classes a week: 6 X 45 minutes, 10 X 40 minutes which adds up to around 11 hours per week. I have never made a lesson plan. I have asked and been told it's not necessary, we use the textbook.

My students are very well behaved, there are zero discipline problems.

I have a co-teacher in every class who completely runs the show. Mostly I stand around and do nothing, perhaps 5-10 minutes of "repeat after me" each class, that's it.

The staff like me and I like them. I'm already being asked to stay for a 3rd year and my contract ends Feb. 28, 2013.

It ain't too bad.
"The urge to destroy is also a creative urge."
Bakunin


  • dachiza727
  • Super Waygook

    • 417

    • June 24, 2010, 09:52:23 pm
    • South Korea
    more
Re: Do some teachers just have it worse than others?
« Reply #19 on: August 30, 2012, 12:47:28 pm »
Stop listening to your CT. If they tell you that your lesson was bad, apologize and tell them you will fix it next week. Then continue on as normal. Stop putting so much "weight" into their opinion.

I've been here almost 4 years.  this is the best advice on the thread.  in addition to the apology and telling them you will fix it next week - i would add a fake smile, and act as if you really care and value their feedback. 

after school classes are tough!  most of my students hardly speek english, compounded by the fact they don't want to be there... if you can get them to voluntarily open their mouths a couple times during class then consider it a success.... beyond that... try to have fun - it's contagious.
"Iíll have a vanilla...one of those vanilla bullshit things. You know, whatever you want, some vanilla bullshit latte cappa thing. Whatever you got."

true dat.