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  • MetalWarrior
  • Explorer

    • 9

    • July 24, 2012, 04:55:16 am
    • Busan
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Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
« Reply #60 on: July 24, 2012, 02:29:59 pm »
Sorry, but where do I find the attached picture?
Or am I being stupid?


Help?!
« Reply #61 on: August 21, 2012, 07:54:01 pm »
Thermostat image attached.

I searched. I looked. I've asked! Can anyone translate this for me? As it is right now, I turn the gas off to the water heater in order to stop the hot water because...when I heat water for the shower, the floor heat is also activated.

Thanks!


  • lotte world
  • The Legend

    • 2272

    • August 22, 2011, 09:00:38 pm
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Re: Help?!
« Reply #62 on: August 21, 2012, 08:52:08 pm »
Thermostat image attached.

I searched. I looked. I've asked! Can anyone translate this for me? As it is right now, I turn the gas off to the water heater in order to stop the hot water because...when I heat water for the shower, the floor heat is also activated.

Thanks!

You might just need to press the white button, centre left, so that it's pushed in.

난방 is heating
온수 is hot water

Right now you want 온수 only, not 난방/온수.


  • tipani
  • Veteran

    • 130

    • September 07, 2012, 03:52:45 pm
Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
« Reply #63 on: September 21, 2012, 07:26:04 pm »
Thank you so much!!! I had no idea how to do anything with my heater/boiler


  • flaffl
  • Newgookin

    • 2

    • August 29, 2012, 08:39:55 pm
Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
« Reply #64 on: October 21, 2012, 12:20:57 am »
http://i.imgur.com/2sTc8.jpg

Hey guys, a quick question about my ondol. First off, it's a Daesung Celtic DSR-220 (if that clarification is needed) and I'm not too sure if it's been heating my floors in the first place. I know that the 난방 button needs to be pressed in order to turn on the heating, and the next thing that pops up is a flashing number. It starts with 25 Celsius and then jumps and doubles to 50 Celsius. I can't feel anything on 25 celsius but I definitely do on 50, but I know that if I turn it to 50, my gas bill is going to become a lot more expensive than it should be. Does anybody know how to control this damn thing and help me out a little better? Thanks in advance!


  • pitufina
  • Newgookin

    • 1

    • December 06, 2012, 08:09:55 am
    • Pyeongtaek
Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
« Reply #65 on: December 06, 2012, 09:03:07 am »
Hi. I need some help, I don't know how to set up my heater/boiler. Here's a picture of my controller. Thanks


  • seungc
  • Explorer

    • 8

    • September 27, 2011, 03:38:29 pm
    • Gangwon, South Korea
Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
« Reply #66 on: February 22, 2013, 10:30:07 am »
You mentioned that you should use the hourly settings when you are away on vacation (in the winter i presume). what setting should i leave it on for regular everyday heating to keep my apt moderately warm. the continuous setting? also, do you recommend keeping the 'water temp' or 'room temp' switched on for gas efficiency?

thanks,
Corey


  • skifflepop
  • Newgookin

    • 4

    • March 03, 2013, 01:33:41 pm
    • Udo Island, Jeju
Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
« Reply #67 on: March 05, 2013, 06:12:10 pm »
http://i.imgur.com/2sTc8.jpg

Hey guys, a quick question about my ondol. First off, it's a Daesung Celtic DSR-220 (if that clarification is needed) and I'm not too sure if it's been heating my floors in the first place. I know that the 난방 button needs to be pressed in order to turn on the heating, and the next thing that pops up is a flashing number. It starts with 25 Celsius and then jumps and doubles to 50 Celsius. I can't feel anything on 25 celsius but I definitely do on 50, but I know that if I turn it to 50, my gas bill is going to become a lot more expensive than it should be. Does anybody know how to control this damn thing and help me out a little better? Thanks in advance!

This is mine too, but I can't feel anything, when it's set to 60, anyone know what i might be doing wrong, water heats fine, I just feel little in the way of under floor heat, and still worry that it's costing me loads bill-wise.


  • msbketa
  • Waygookin

    • 12

    • March 04, 2013, 10:51:54 am
Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
« Reply #68 on: March 07, 2013, 09:35:34 am »
That's what I have too.  The closest I could come to finding instructions was this:

http://eng.celtic.co.kr/eng/pdf/DSR-220.pdf

  I'm assuming the directions are the same even though there are symbols instead of hangul.  Hope that helps!


  • philby1985
  • Expert Waygook

    • 662

    • March 05, 2013, 09:10:49 am
    • Daejeon
Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
« Reply #69 on: October 08, 2013, 11:14:09 pm »


  • Cshoward
  • Waygookin

    • 19

    • November 15, 2012, 02:48:47 pm
    • Taebaek
THERMOSTAT AND HEATER TROUBLESHOOTING THREAD
« Reply #70 on: November 28, 2013, 09:18:21 am »
Post your question here.

I'll start by asking, what is the most cost efficient way to use my heater?
Is it better to keep it on the "continuous" setting? or the "every 3hours/2hours/1hours" setting?

I live in an area where my pipes can freeze. What should I set it on when I go on vacation?

Any other useful information?
« Last Edit: December 04, 2013, 05:02:35 pm by taeyang »


  • namerae
  • Featured Contributor

    • 207

    • September 26, 2011, 09:38:41 am
    • Anyang, South Korea
Re: THERMOSTAT AND HEATER TROUBLESHOOTING THREAD
« Reply #71 on: November 28, 2013, 09:37:34 am »
My coworker told me that the 실내 setting is 1/2 ondol and water heater. If you have 도시 gas, it's the lowest energy setting you can use. After playing with it for two days, I agree. I crank it up to 26C, let it warm up, and before bed turn it to 24C. If the inside air gets colder than 24C, it will kick in and warm up the place again.

If you're going on vacation, I'd say put it on a lower temp (maybe 18C?) and walk away. No point in having frozen pipes and having to take a cold shower after a tropical vacation ;)


  • stemarty
  • Featured Contributor

    • 1135

    • September 02, 2011, 12:20:42 pm
    • Jeonnamdo
Re: THERMOSTAT AND HEATER TROUBLESHOOTING THREAD
« Reply #72 on: November 28, 2013, 09:56:45 am »
Post your question here.

I'll start by asking, what is the most cost efficient way to use my heater?


This all really depends on your budget. How much are you willing to pay for heat?

In my first year, I did the cheap route and was really conscious of my heat useage. I ended up spending Christmas and New Years in the hospital with a lung infection.

Now that i've been here 3 years when I think about it:
- It costed over $300 to heat my last house in Canada. So I don't really see the fear in paying $100 a month in Korea to be comfortable. And thats heating my main room and leaving it on for a few hours each day. (plus weekends on an off)

If you're in super savings mode:
- Dont use the heater. Bundle up on sweaters and blankets.
- Zone your apartment and heat the smallest room. Hibernate there. Turn it into a man cave. Put your bed, table, TV, gaming systems, computers, and books in there.
- Electric blankets are nice substitutes.
- Space heaters will suck a lot of electricity, but not as much as using heat all the time. 
- Put heat on for an hour until it warms up...then turn it off. Repeat when cold.

- Doing the automatic on/off system is a good idea if you can figure it out. My ondol is old so it never stays programmed properly.

Post your question here.

I live in an area where my pipes can freeze. What should I set it on when I go on vacation?

Keep your taps dripping. Make sure all the taps have a little bit of water dripping out.
Keep your boiler on "idle"

This will help (but not prevent) freezing pipes if there aren't many ppl living in your building


Re: THERMOSTAT AND HEATER TROUBLESHOOTING THREAD
« Reply #73 on: November 28, 2013, 10:11:07 am »
This depends on whether or not you are in a newer building built within the last several years.  Newer buildings with insulation will probably have these type of energy efficient heaters.  But, you might live in an older uninsulated building where the heater will run all the time and you could find a very shocking gas or electric bill.  Be careful of that.

If it's a newer insulated building, the system will shut off when the desired temperature is reached. 

However, if the daytime temperature is above 0, you can safely shut it off and pipes won't freeze.  Alwys leave it off in an older building.  In a newer building, you can leave it off too.  Won't make a big difference.  Only in January when you have a minor cold snap where the daytime high is below freezing (0 degrees), do you need to worry about the pipes freezing. 

In this situation, a newer building leave it on a low temperature while out.  In an older building, better to leave it off unless you are very rich and like paying money.  Just have to take your chances.  If owner chews you out about frozen pipes, chew him out for not upgrading his building to modern standards. 

Currently, I shut it off during the day.  In the evening, I set it around 20 or 21 degrees and turn it down to around 17 degrees (16 to 18ish) at night when going to bed.  Warm blankets keep down the need for so much heat and save money.  (I live in a newer efficient insulated building.)  I leave it on all day when it's below 0 for an extended time.  When I do leave it on during the day, it's usually on a low temperature.  (Maybe around 12 or 14 degrees.)


Re: THERMOSTAT AND HEATER TROUBLESHOOTING THREAD
« Reply #74 on: November 28, 2013, 10:19:29 am »
Post your question here.

I'll start by asking, what is the most cost efficient way to use my heater?


This all really depends on your budget. How much are you willing to pay for heat?

In my first year, I did the cheap route and was really conscious of my heat useage. I ended up spending Christmas and New Years in the hospital with a lung infection.


I feel for you there.  Sounds like you were in an older uninsulated building where the costs would have been ridiculous.  Those type of buildings are also susceptible to mold.  There's always so much humidity and moisture in the air here that no heating mixed with your carbon dioxide and water vapour gets stuck to the wallpaper that creates mold.  Breathing that sh!t in ain't good for your health.  A newer building well insulated won't have the mold issue.  Sadly, it seems many English teachers do get stuck in those older buildings. 


  • stemarty
  • Featured Contributor

    • 1135

    • September 02, 2011, 12:20:42 pm
    • Jeonnamdo
Re: THERMOSTAT AND HEATER TROUBLESHOOTING THREAD
« Reply #75 on: November 28, 2013, 10:48:21 am »
Post your question here.

I'll start by asking, what is the most cost efficient way to use my heater?


This all really depends on your budget. How much are you willing to pay for heat?

In my first year, I did the cheap route and was really conscious of my heat useage. I ended up spending Christmas and New Years in the hospital with a lung infection.


I feel for you there.  Sounds like you were in an older uninsulated building where the costs would have been ridiculous.  Those type of buildings are also susceptible to mold.  There's always so much humidity and moisture in the air here that no heating mixed with your carbon dioxide and water vapour gets stuck to the wallpaper that creates mold.  Breathing that sh!t in ain't good for your health.  A newer building well insulated won't have the mold issue.  Sadly, it seems many English teachers do get stuck in those older buildings.

Ah True. You got it.
Im in a really old building. Mold on the ceilings, pipes freeze in the winter (regardless if I have the taps running) and there is no insulation whatsoever. The pipes even run OUTSIDE.

weigookin is right, depending on where you live and what kind of building will definitely alter how you can convserve energy.

If you have a new building, follow others advice and you'll be fine...but if you have a building like mine then prepare for long cold nights, unless you're willing to pay $200+ a month.


Re: THERMOSTAT AND HEATER TROUBLESHOOTING THREAD
« Reply #76 on: November 28, 2013, 12:36:58 pm »
If you're going away for vacation you'd be better off draining the water system in your apartment.

To drain the system, shut off the main valve and turn on every tap (both hot and cold lines) until water stops running.

When you return turn it back on and let each tap run until the pipes are full again.

No water in the pipes = no pipes freezing.


  • Space
  • The Legend

    • 2288

    • May 09, 2012, 10:11:12 pm
Re: THERMOSTAT AND HEATER TROUBLESHOOTING THREAD
« Reply #77 on: November 28, 2013, 01:01:23 pm »
If you're going away for vacation you'd be better off draining the water system in your apartment.

To drain the system, shut off the main valve and turn on every tap (both hot and cold lines) until water stops running.

When you return turn it back on and let each tap run until the pipes are full again.

No water in the pipes = no pipes freezing.

This seems like a good idea. What would it look like? and where is it usually kept?. I know where the gas valve is, and the electric switches are, but I don't recall ever seeing one for water.


  • philby1985
  • Expert Waygook

    • 662

    • March 05, 2013, 09:10:49 am
    • Daejeon
Re: THERMOSTAT AND HEATER TROUBLESHOOTING THREAD
« Reply #78 on: November 28, 2013, 01:14:58 pm »
Best way to save money, move into an apartment with triple glazed windows, but poor insulation between floors and let the apartment above you heat yours for free :)

I am yet to turn on my heater so far this winter  :evil:


  • acousticr
  • Expert Waygook

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    • January 24, 2013, 11:42:50 am
    • Gyeonggi
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Re: THERMOSTAT AND HEATER TROUBLESHOOTING THREAD
« Reply #79 on: November 28, 2013, 01:17:23 pm »
If you're going away for vacation you'd be better off draining the water system in your apartment.

To drain the system, shut off the main valve and turn on every tap (both hot and cold lines) until water stops running.

When you return turn it back on and let each tap run until the pipes are full again.

No water in the pipes = no pipes freezing.

This seems like a good idea. What would it look like? and where is it usually kept?. I know where the gas valve is, and the electric switches are, but I don't recall ever seeing one for water.

I think it'll be by your boiler. There was a valve under my boiler that I had to turn off when the landlord wanted to replace my boiler earlier this year. But that might be further along in the system than would be effective, I don't know.

As a general tip, add weather stripping to your doors at least. My door was extremely drafty. I've also put plastic on the sliding doors, but since I didn't want to put it on the windows (I wanted to be able to open them), the effect was pretty minimal.
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