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Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
« Reply #100 on: December 24, 2014, 09:24:52 am »
Hi guys! I have this model (just stole the pic from earlier in the thread so ignore the red circle this time).

Recently my water hasn't been heating up properly, but my floor heating works perfectly. If I leave my water and floor heating on for a couple hours I manage to have a lukewarm shower which fluctuates between warm and freezing cold every few seconds. I've tried everything, including pushing all the buttons to see if it helps.

Does anybody know what might be wrong?
Also, am I supposed to leave the hot water on all day or turn it off when not in use?

Please help!

You shouldn't have your ondol on and shower at the same time, otherwise the two are competing for hot water. Try turning your ondol off for a bit before showering.

Some showers can also be notoriously temperamental. I had the same problem as you, and realized it was caused by having the handle all the way up for maximum water flow. If i push the handle half way up, i have no problems.

If none of those work get your building maintainence people to have a look at your boiler, there may be a problem with it.


Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
« Reply #101 on: December 24, 2014, 09:42:15 am »
Hey, any ideas about how I should set the controls as I am leaving Korea for three weeks and don't want to come back to frozen pipes. I have been told to let the water drip in the washroom as well. Attached is a picture of my heat control panel

If you just turn the right knob all the way left towards minus, that's the "Out" setting. It will keep the ondol on but at the lowest possible setting.

Sorry for potentially stupid question, but the left knob should be turned to the ondol setting, right?


  • 한소로
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Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
« Reply #102 on: December 24, 2014, 01:06:15 pm »
Hey, any ideas about how I should set the controls as I am leaving Korea for three weeks and don't want to come back to frozen pipes. I have been told to let the water drip in the washroom as well. Attached is a picture of my heat control panel

If you just turn the right knob all the way left towards minus, that's the "Out" setting. It will keep the ondol on but at the lowest possible setting.

Sorry for potentially stupid question, but the left knob should be turned to the ondol setting, right?

No worries. Yes, bottom left.


  • hick
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Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
« Reply #103 on: January 13, 2015, 02:58:08 pm »
thanks for the advice!
I'll turn on the 외출 when i leave but do i need to turn on the hot water also?


  • Mezoti97
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Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
« Reply #104 on: January 13, 2015, 03:19:23 pm »
thanks for the advice!
I'll turn on the 외출 when i leave but do i need to turn on the hot water also?

I don't think so. I think just letting the tap drip should suffice.


  • pkjh
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Re: THERMOSTAT AND HEATER TROUBLESHOOTING THREAD
« Reply #105 on: January 14, 2015, 08:38:36 am »
When I I turn on the ondol it doesn't go lower than 40C, is that normal? What can I expect to pay a month in a small apartment if I had it at that level 24/7?

About ₩1,000,000,000 a month.
I keep mine on once the average temps get below 15 C. It ranges from 60,000 to 120,000 won a month from oct/nov to march/april. The other half of the year I usually pay around 20,000-won. I don't use any electric blankets, or heaters, or long johns.


  • snorske
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    • March 05, 2012, 01:49:36 pm
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Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
« Reply #106 on: March 03, 2015, 09:37:25 pm »


Hello!

I've been looking for instructions on using the navien NR-15S, A/S 1588-1144  heating/heater controller I have but didn't find it here so here is a link to English instructions I managed to find elsewhere:

http://m.kdnavien.co.kr/roomcon/RoomConView.asp?SEQ=85&cmd=V&TTYPE=RC&sch_stype=&sch_sval=&page=1&

Although it's English the translation is terrible and I'm having trouble figuring out what it ACTUALLY means - can anyone with some experience who is better able to read between the lines/figure it out shed some light?

This is also a video demonstration on using it but it's in Korean:
http://www.youtube.com/v/3PgXlrEvtHo?version=3&hl=ko_KR&rel=0

Some other questions too:
1. I have TWO valve/turning knob things under my sink - what are they each for? I saw a video about the gas saying you only have to turn these knobs a little way on to get it to work and if you open it fully your place gets no warmer but your bill is much higher. SO I wanted to know what they were before I go changing what they're turned to. (I've attached a picture)

2. What's the most cost effective way to keep your place warm - my coteacher had told me to turn the thermostat/thing off when I'm not using it because it's expensive (I live on an Island so it's especially bad here apparently), but my mum says I'm spending MORE money doing that because it'll cost more to keep heating it up from being 12C when I get home from work than it would be to just leave it on all the time and let it maintain a temperature instead.

3. When I go away over winter, what's the most cost effective and ACTUALLY effective way to keep pipes from freezing etc? I intend to leave my taps on but should I leave them dripping HOT water? What about heating the room - if my controls have a "vacation mode" - what does that ACTUALLY mean my heating will do? If I don't, what should I do - is it better  to leave my thermostat on the whole time but set at a low temperature (in the sense that I assume it only kicks in to maintain temp when it drops too low) using the degrees celcius option? Or use the (I assume) timer option (which I don't actually understand how it works based on that terrible translation)? Or what I THINK looks like an option for controlling the temperature of the water in the pipes (how does that work too??)? Is one method of heating more expensive than others?

THanks for any and all clarification you can give me =)

i have this same controller 나비엔 NR-15SB and was wondering exactly how the "예약 - timer" setting works. You can choose 0-12 hours in 1 hour intervals.  Does this mean if you set it to "2" that it simply turns off after 2 hours?

Here is the korean explanation, but I'm confused on the translation:  예약난방은 난방 정지시간을 예약하는 기능으로 0~12시간 중 원하는 예약시간을 설정하면 30분간 난방한 후 예약시간 만큼 난방이 정지되고 다시 난방을 반복하는 기능입니다

thanks!


  • hctong
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Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
« Reply #107 on: November 24, 2015, 07:58:13 am »
stupid questions but what exactly is the difference between ondol and shilneh?


  • Horsey
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    • October 01, 2014, 02:21:08 pm
Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
« Reply #108 on: November 24, 2015, 11:49:43 am »
Anyone know why the floor won't heat up well, although the tap water is perfectly hot?

It's been the case in every flat I've occupied. I even had my boiler replaced this month so that isn't it. Maybe just luck of the draw?

Everyone else seems to live in apartments where the floor gets very warm to the touch. But if I blast my ondol at 80 degrees for hours, it's just lukewarm in patches and cold in the rest.


  • emmas28
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Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
« Reply #109 on: January 07, 2016, 09:30:47 am »
Hey, any ideas about how I should set the controls as I am leaving Korea for three weeks and don't want to come back to frozen pipes. I have been told to let the water drip in the washroom as well. Attached is a picture of my heat control panel

Hi Plan B, did this work out ok for you? I have the same system and am going away on Saturday for 2 weeks. I'm out in Gangwon-do and it get's pretty cold here!


  • jamonamagnet
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Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
« Reply #110 on: January 07, 2016, 12:13:29 pm »
I just leave mine on the same setting when I am there, but I turn down the thermostat to something low, like 16 degrees.  So the heating comes on and off as normal, but the rooms are not so hot.  This means that the pipes won't freeze, and also the apt. is not super-cold when I return.


Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
« Reply #111 on: January 07, 2016, 12:19:35 pm »
Hey, any ideas about how I should set the controls as I am leaving Korea for three weeks and don't want to come back to frozen pipes. I have been told to let the water drip in the washroom as well. Attached is a picture of my heat control panel

Hi Plan B, did this work out ok for you? I have the same system and am going away on Saturday for 2 weeks. I'm out in Gangwon-do and it get's pretty cold here!

Geeze you're not kidding.  I checked the temps for tomorrow.Down south it's 6 degrees in the afternoon with a low of minus 2 overnight.  In Chuncheon, it's a high of 2 and an overnight low of minus 12.  I never thought the diferences were that much in such a small country.  (Actually not that cold to me either, but colder thn downsouth.  Though I'd take it if it meant dry air instead of foggy or damp air sometimes.)  If the temps or temps with the wind chills are below 0, use the away setting or if no away setting, then just keep it on a low temperature.  If it's above 0 by quite a bit and down near 0 or only minus 2 at night, turn it off and don't bother.  Only when it's prolonged below 0 for a long time do you need to worry about freezing pipes. Otherwise, save your money. 


  • damocha
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Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
« Reply #112 on: January 07, 2016, 01:06:08 pm »
I have a similar system as Snorske. I watched the video a few months ago with my Korean friend and he explained the functions to me.

The bottom right button (전원) turns the unit on and off. When the unit turns on, you should see the words 실내 (interior) on the left and 현재언도 (current temperature) above the temperature (the left side of the curvy line.)

If you want to adjust the temperature, press the + or - buttons. You will see the numbers go up or down accordingly. You will also see the words above the temperature change to 희망언도 (set temperature / temperature you want. This is the right side of the curvy line above the numbers.)

If your set temperature is higher than the current temperature, a green light will appear and you should hear your boiler kick on after a few seconds. The temperature will also return to display the current temperature (현재언도.)

This setting is much like the ones I've used at home. You set a temperature and the thermostat will kick on when the room temperature is below the set temperature. When the room temp reaches the desired temperature, the thermostat turns off. However, every time I have used it, it does not work as well as the ones back home. My room could be set for 20 degrees and my actual room temperature reads 23 with the boiler still running. Even my Korean friends say that this method isn't reliable.

The top right button (온수) controls the temperature for the water. When you press it, you will see something that looks like a bar graph on the screen. It will add a bar each time you push it, meaning the water temperature will be hotter. There is not really any reason to have it on more than one bar as the water still gets plenty hot on one bar.

The top left button (난방)  toggles your boiler between a thermostat, ondol, and timer. BE CAREFUL WITH THIS BUTTON. When you first turn your unit on, it should be set as a thermostat. The word on the left side should say 실내 and is located above the weird line.

If you press the 난방 button once, the word on the left changes to 온돌 (ondol) and is located in the middle of the weird lines. This setting is like a jimjilbang bath house. The temperature will set itself to 65 CELCIUS (149 Fahrenheit). I made the mistake of falling asleep with this setting once and woke up sweating my ass off.

If you press the 난방 button a second time, the words change to 예약 (lit. reservation AKA timer) and is located under the weird line. When you use this setting, you will see the numbers in the single or low double digits along with the word 시간 (hour) beside it. This will allow you to set your heater on a timer.

For example, if you set the time for 04 hours, the heater will kick on every 4 hours and stops automatically after awhile. The temperature of the room will not matter. The heater should start up every 4 hours if you use this setting. If you find yourself too hot, increase the time. If you are too cold, decrease it.

My Korean friend said that before helping me understand the boiler, he and his wife only turned it on and off. Afterwards, they used the timer setting. He said they set the temperature for 6 hours and left it on even when they slept or went to work. They said their gas bill was reduced after using this setting. Last month, they paid 66,000 won which his wife said was "very reasonable."

The lower left button 외출 (away) is what you are supposed to use when you leave for long periods of time. Does that mean when you go to work? When you go on vacation? I have no idea. I never use it. Neither do my Korean friends. Then again, I live in the southern part of the peninsula so I don't worry much about my pipes freezing.

Hope this is helpful.


  • emmas28
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    • August 27, 2015, 10:42:23 am
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Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
« Reply #113 on: January 08, 2016, 03:24:07 pm »
Hey, any ideas about how I should set the controls as I am leaving Korea for three weeks and don't want to come back to frozen pipes. I have been told to let the water drip in the washroom as well. Attached is a picture of my heat control panel

Hi Plan B, did this work out ok for you? I have the same system and am going away on Saturday for 2 weeks. I'm out in Gangwon-do and it get's pretty cold here!

Geeze you're not kidding.  I checked the temps for tomorrow.Down south it's 6 degrees in the afternoon with a low of minus 2 overnight.  In Chuncheon, it's a high of 2 and an overnight low of minus 12.  I never thought the diferences were that much in such a small country.  (Actually not that cold to me either, but colder thn downsouth.  Though I'd take it if it meant dry air instead of foggy or damp air sometimes.)  If the temps or temps with the wind chills are below 0, use the away setting or if no away setting, then just keep it on a low temperature.  If it's above 0 by quite a bit and down near 0 or only minus 2 at night, turn it off and don't bother.  Only when it's prolonged below 0 for a long time do you need to worry about freezing pipes. Otherwise, save your money.

Haha no I wasn't! I'm up in the mountains so it's even colder than Chuncheon. I'll leave it on the away setting and fingers crossed all will be well   :smiley:


Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
« Reply #114 on: January 12, 2016, 12:29:04 pm »
Hey, any ideas about how I should set the controls as I am leaving Korea for three weeks and don't want to come back to frozen pipes. I have been told to let the water drip in the washroom as well. Attached is a picture of my heat control panel

Hi Plan B, did this work out ok for you? I have the same system and am going away on Saturday for 2 weeks. I'm out in Gangwon-do and it get's pretty cold here!

Geeze you're not kidding.  I checked the temps for tomorrow.Down south it's 6 degrees in the afternoon with a low of minus 2 overnight.  In Chuncheon, it's a high of 2 and an overnight low of minus 12.  I never thought the diferences were that much in such a small country.  (Actually not that cold to me either, but colder thn downsouth.  Though I'd take it if it meant dry air instead of foggy or damp air sometimes.)  If the temps or temps with the wind chills are below 0, use the away setting or if no away setting, then just keep it on a low temperature.  If it's above 0 by quite a bit and down near 0 or only minus 2 at night, turn it off and don't bother.  Only when it's prolonged below 0 for a long time do you need to worry about freezing pipes. Otherwise, save your money.

Haha no I wasn't! I'm up in the mountains so it's even colder than Chuncheon. I'll leave it on the away setting and fingers crossed all will be well   :smiley:

That's probably wise of you to do that.  Should be ok then.  The next week or so will be the coldest time of year here.  Just curious, how is that place in the summer?  Is it more dry and cool or still hot and humid up there? 


  • emmas28
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Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
« Reply #115 on: January 25, 2016, 01:00:31 pm »
Hey, any ideas about how I should set the controls as I am leaving Korea for three weeks and don't want to come back to frozen pipes. I have been told to let the water drip in the washroom as well. Attached is a picture of my heat control panel

Hi Plan B, did this work out ok for you? I have the same system and am going away on Saturday for 2 weeks. I'm out in Gangwon-do and it get's pretty cold here!

Geeze you're not kidding.  I checked the temps for tomorrow.Down south it's 6 degrees in the afternoon with a low of minus 2 overnight.  In Chuncheon, it's a high of 2 and an overnight low of minus 12.  I never thought the diferences were that much in such a small country.  (Actually not that cold to me either, but colder thn downsouth.  Though I'd take it if it meant dry air instead of foggy or damp air sometimes.)  If the temps or temps with the wind chills are below 0, use the away setting or if no away setting, then just keep it on a low temperature.  If it's above 0 by quite a bit and down near 0 or only minus 2 at night, turn it off and don't bother.  Only when it's prolonged below 0 for a long time do you need to worry about freezing pipes. Otherwise, save your money.

Haha no I wasn't! I'm up in the mountains so it's even colder than Chuncheon. I'll leave it on the away setting and fingers crossed all will be well   :smiley:

That's probably wise of you to do that.  Should be ok then.  The next week or so will be the coldest time of year here.  Just curious, how is that place in the summer?  Is it more dry and cool or still hot and humid up there?

I arrived in August last year and it was hot! It's not so humid though because of the altitude and open air but thank god for air con nevertheless.

Oh, and the pipes seemed to have survived the below 18C we had while I was away  ;D


Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
« Reply #116 on: December 05, 2016, 09:17:12 pm »
Today I got home to find my boiler had the red 물보충 light on. I fixed it thanks to google and Rinnai youtube videos but I want to know how a boiler runs out of water in the first place?


  • Piggydee
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    • October 15, 2013, 07:32:43 am
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Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
« Reply #117 on: December 06, 2016, 09:51:23 am »

The lower left button 외출 (away) is what you are supposed to use when you leave for long periods of time. Does that mean when you go to work? When you go on vacation? I have no idea. I never use it. Neither do my Korean friends. Then again, I live in the southern part of the peninsula so I don't worry much about my pipes freezing.

Hope this is helpful.

Great advice!  And I do have to say you should leave it on 외출 even when you go to school or vacation.  It keeps the boiler from freezing.  And as someone who has meet three foreigners who've had to pay for frozen boilers, it's not a cheap thing to replace.   Now yes I have been told by a few Koreans that you can just turn off the entire system it doesn't matter.  However, they probably don't know how to use their boiler either.  So I'm not going to trust turning it off and risk having to pay 500,000won later to my landlord just because one of my Korean friends gave me bad advice. 


Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
« Reply #118 on: December 09, 2016, 07:54:39 am »
stupid questions but what exactly is the difference between ondol and shilneh?

Shilnae means temperature of the room. If your thermostat shows two different shilnae and ondol temperatures, ondol is the water temperature in the pipes, while shilnae is the actual/desired temperature of the room.


  • cpage4
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Re: Boiler/Heater (Gas) Control 101
« Reply #119 on: April 11, 2018, 10:34:14 am »
My water is not getting hot. No matter what i try. It gets warm and then cold again....What can I do?