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Re: Funny Co-Teacher's Comments
« Reply #480 on: June 19, 2015, 09:03:16 am »
mine says 'boy' on the end of everything she says to me. like 'you are good boy!, you are late boy! you are crazy boy! shes only 2 years older than me  :rolleyes:

That is f'ed up, really?

I don't know, this sounds more cute than off-putting.

Hahahahah this sounds SO awkward to me.

No, awkward was when my principal greeted me with "hello, shekshi!" I tripped and fell on the stairs in shock.

Turns out he had no idea what it meant.

The word of the same sound 색시 also means newly-wed bride! Thank goodness my husband stepped in to translate the first time someone called me 색시...
I felt sorry for myself because I had no shoes-- until I met a man with no feet.


  • TygerBeat11
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    • June 28, 2013, 02:20:35 am
    • Daegu, South Korea
Re: Funny Co-Teacher's Comments
« Reply #481 on: June 19, 2015, 11:04:32 am »
One of my co-t, when she is distressed or something went wrong she goes
"Oh what a terrible".... :huh:
And I'm standing there waiting for the rest of the sentence!!! A terrible what????


  • Hau5fly
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    • March 16, 2015, 04:06:54 am
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Re: Funny Co-Teacher's Comments
« Reply #482 on: June 19, 2015, 11:39:00 am »
My Co says "what about" to give herself time when she is thinking of her next line/idea to say to me.

Every time, without fail, i hear MJ's Earth Song in my head and i want to break into song "what about us"...!!!


  • Aristocrat
  • Hero of Waygookistan

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    • November 10, 2014, 01:04:27 pm
Re: Funny Co-Teacher's Comments
« Reply #483 on: June 19, 2015, 02:21:05 pm »
Not really something she said, but something she did.

CT gives me one of those juice sachets, in the clear packet. "This is very famous juice, very good for your health". It doesn't look like anything special, but she seems so proud and impressed by this unassuming juice sachet. She cuts the corner of my packet, and I take a sip. It's good, but tastes like any other juice. "No! No! No!" she protests "You must drink it like this", she cuts a small opening in the corner, drinks, and for unknown reasons, with the sachet still in her mouth she cuts the opposite corner as well.

"I don't think that's a good idea." I said. She leans forward and half the sachet spills and pours down the front of her blouse.

Before the 70s porno music started playing, I turned around and let her have the room.


Re: Funny Co-Teacher's Comments
« Reply #484 on: June 19, 2015, 02:56:01 pm »
I have a gym teacher at my school who likes to ask me weird questions all the time (like "What is the wonderful place?" without the ability to explain what he actually means). Today at lunch he said "Hey. You are 26 years old?"
Me: Yes.
Him: How old am I? Do you think?
Me: haha I'm not sure. I'm bad at guessing age.
Him: I am 35. *long pause as if the conversation is dropped* Many people think I am even younger than you though. Because of hair. I have young hair.
My coteacher: *whispers to me a bit too avidly* NO ONE thinks that. I don't think ANYONE thinks he is younger.


Re: Funny Co-Teacher's Comments
« Reply #485 on: June 19, 2015, 03:06:44 pm »
CT: "Shitting! SHITTING!!!!!!"
ME: O_o
CT: "Sorry. I'm tired. It's okay, right?"
ME: "Um...yeah, go for it."


  • nomadicmadda
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Re: Funny Co-Teacher's Comments
« Reply #486 on: June 19, 2015, 05:12:59 pm »
I'm a tall, thin female and the teachers at my travel high school were all very eager to introduce themselves and show off their English to a "real American".  I'm pretty smiley and friendly and try to make talking with a foreigner as approachable as possible, even if they don't speak much English.  During my first or second week, my CT and I were chatting when a 50's something male teacher (MT) approached us in the teacher's lounge:

MT: Hello Teacher!!
Me: Hello, nice to see you again.
MT: [says something in Korean to my CT about me, finishing with boisterous laughter] Goodbye! [walks away]
Me: Uhhh....what?
CT: Oh, he says he is married now, but when he dies, he hopes when he is reincarnated he can marry a girl just as beautiful and sexy as you.
Me: ....oh....Haha....uhm, that's very nice...

Awkwardly enough, he said the exact same thing yet again when we got a new contract KET in March and had her translate it to me a second time!  :lipsrsealed:  What an awkwardly specific compliment.


  • nomadicmadda
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Re: Funny Co-Teacher's Comments
« Reply #487 on: August 26, 2015, 01:56:03 pm »
Started at a new school this Monday. We have a lot of young female teachers who I'm really looking forward to befriending.  One in particular is a year or two younger than me, and is in her first year teaching.  We were talking about dating, and she told me she's never had a boyfriend or dated anyone.  I said that it was better to wait and date someone you resonate with than jump into a random relationship "just because," and this ensued:

Quote
:cry: CT1: Yes, but I am a homeroom teacher.  Our students, they drive me crazy every day!  They are crazy about dating!
;D Me: *laughs* No way!  I know that's common in Western culture, but I thought Korean students didn't often date?
>:( CT1: *dead-serious look of annoyance* Yes.  Out students, they are always dating, dating, dating.  They never study; they only study so they can date together!
:huh: Me: They only study so they can spend time together?
:evil: CT1: *with disgust* Yes!  *dramatic hand gestures* THEY ARE ON FIREEEEEE!

My neighboring teacher after she leaves:
Quote
:wink: CT2: This is not _____ High School, it is _____ Hallyu-School!

And some boys just came in and were telling teachers the latest relationship gossip in their class.  Must be true  :huh:
« Last Edit: August 26, 2015, 02:23:19 pm by nomadicmadda »


  • Toshiba
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Re: Funny Co-Teacher's Comments
« Reply #488 on: August 26, 2015, 07:10:47 pm »
I've got dozens of these.

Mrs B (filling out a form about me): UK is your country.
Me: Ireland.
Mrs B: It's the same as UK.
Me: Are you Japanese?
Mrs B: ...

Sorry, but that's your own fault for giving the name of an island instead of a country. People are either from the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, or they're from the Republic of Ireland. It's possible the previous teacher had a British passport and she saw the word "[Northern] Ireland" imprinted on it. And since Korea is "the only divided country in the world" all of Ireland must be part of the UK.

It will be in about fifty years hence, but that's not the case at present.

In future please refer to your 26 county entity by its actual name. This might clear up some confusion.



Re: Funny Co-Teacher's Comments
« Reply #489 on: August 26, 2015, 07:32:00 pm »

Sorry, but that's your own fault for giving the name of an island instead of a country. People are either from the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, or they're from the Republic of Ireland. It's possible the previous teacher had a British passport and she saw the word "[Northern] Ireland" imprinted on it. And since Korea is "the only divided country in the world" all of Ireland must be part of the UK.

It will be in about fifty years hence, but that's not the case at present.

In future please refer to your 26 county entity by its actual name. This might clear up some confusion.




The Constitution of Ireland, adopted in 1937, provides that "the name of the State is Éire, or, in the English language, Ireland".

To clarify, Ireland is also known as the Republic of Ireland. The name of the country is not the Republic of Ireland, it is Ireland.
« Last Edit: August 26, 2015, 07:34:37 pm by shanebarry1986 »


  • nomadicmadda
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Re: Funny Co-Teacher's Comments
« Reply #490 on: August 26, 2015, 10:08:28 pm »
Sorry, but that's your own fault for giving the name of an island instead of a country. People are either from the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, or they're from the Republic of Ireland. It's possible the previous teacher had a British passport and she saw the word "[Northern] Ireland" imprinted on it. And since Korea is "the only divided country in the world" all of Ireland must be part of the UK.

It will be in about fifty years hence, but that's not the case at present.

In future please refer to your 26 county entity by its actual name. This might clear up some confusion.

Might wanna check your sodium intake  :wink:


Re: Funny Co-Teacher's Comments
« Reply #491 on: August 26, 2015, 10:17:52 pm »
I've got dozens of these.

Mrs B (filling out a form about me): UK is your country.
Me: Ireland.
Mrs B: It's the same as UK.
Me: Are you Japanese?
Mrs B: ...

Sorry, but that's your own fault for giving the name of an island instead of a country. People are either from the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, or they're from the Republic of Ireland. It's possible the previous teacher had a British passport and she saw the word "[Northern] Ireland" imprinted on it. And since Korea is "the only divided country in the world" all of Ireland must be part of the UK.

It will be in about fifty years hence, but that's not the case at present.

In future please refer to your 26 county entity by its actual name. This might clear up some confusion.

'Ireland' is the most common term for the state encompassing 26 counties, it's an official and legal name and is internationally recognised, including by Britain. It's an acceptable (and sensible) answer to the question, "what country are you from?" for people from the Irish Republic. I don't know whether you're just being contrarian or if you hold a certain right-wing political stance on this issue.


Re: Funny Co-Teacher's Comments
« Reply #492 on: August 27, 2015, 07:28:15 am »
EPIK itself refers to the country as Ireland...

edit:
And I'd bet money that a teacher who thinks Ireland is the same as the UK wouldn't know what you meant by saying "Sorry, I meant Republic of Ireland."
« Last Edit: August 27, 2015, 07:34:24 am by slycordinator »


  • englishrose
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    • June 24, 2013, 07:27:22 am
    • South Korea
Re: Funny Co-Teacher's Comments
« Reply #493 on: August 27, 2015, 07:34:46 am »
I've got dozens of these.

Mrs B (filling out a form about me): UK is your country.
Me: Ireland.
Mrs B: It's the same as UK.
Me: Are you Japanese?
Mrs B: ...

Sorry, but that's your own fault for giving the name of an island instead of a country. People are either from the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, or they're from the Republic of Ireland. It's possible the previous teacher had a British passport and she saw the word "[Northern] Ireland" imprinted on it. And since Korea is "the only divided country in the world" all of Ireland must be part of the UK.

It will be in about fifty years hence, but that's not the case at present.

In future please refer to your 26 county entity by its actual name. This might clear up some confusion.

'Ireland' is the most common term for the state encompassing 26 counties, it's an official and legal name and is internationally recognised, including by Britain. It's an acceptable (and sensible) answer to the question, "what country are you from?" for people from the Irish Republic. I don't know whether you're just being contrarian or if you hold a certain right-wing political stance on this issue.

I suspect Toshiba was jesting. Everyone know that Ireland is a country. Confusion can arise in the reverse case of someone from Northern Ireland referring to themselves as Irish.

Toshiba was probably having a dig at the unique cultural asset where people with postgraduate qualifications and trained to educate are blissfully unaware of basic geography yet feel no restraint in making stupid assertions.





  • Horus
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    • March 22, 2011, 08:15:24 am
    • Korea
Re: Funny Co-Teacher's Comments
« Reply #494 on: August 27, 2015, 07:49:18 am »
It's all a bit silly. The Irish constitution only has jurisdiction over the Irish Republic. It does not have jurisdiction over N. Ireland, which remains part of the UK. Irish nationalists in Northern Ireland might, nevertheless, answer "Ireland" to the 'where are you from' question, but that's just identity mixed with an aspiration to unity. They are emphatically not from the entity described as 'Ireland' in the Irish constitution. The constitution of 1937 has no application where they live. They, and their unionist neighbours, are from "the island of" Ireland which again is distinct from the entity mentioned in the constitution of one section of that island.

Language should be used to clarify, not confuse matters.



Re: Funny Co-Teacher's Comments
« Reply #495 on: August 27, 2015, 07:53:14 am »
Anyone born on the island of Ireland can have an Irish passport, so it's a bit more than just an "identity mixed with an aspiration to unity".


Re: Funny Co-Teacher's Comments
« Reply #496 on: August 27, 2015, 07:53:49 am »
I've got dozens of these.

Mrs B (filling out a form about me): UK is your country.
Me: Ireland.
Mrs B: It's the same as UK.
Me: Are you Japanese?
Mrs B: ...

Sorry, but that's your own fault for giving the name of an island instead of a country. People are either from the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, or they're from the Republic of Ireland. It's possible the previous teacher had a British passport and she saw the word "[Northern] Ireland" imprinted on it. And since Korea is "the only divided country in the world" all of Ireland must be part of the UK.

It will be in about fifty years hence, but that's not the case at present.

In future please refer to your 26 county entity by its actual name. This might clear up some confusion.

Unbelievable potatoes. What planet are you from?


  • englishrose
  • Expert Waygook

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    • June 24, 2013, 07:27:22 am
    • South Korea
Re: Funny Co-Teacher's Comments
« Reply #497 on: August 27, 2015, 08:00:57 am »
It's all a bit silly. The Irish constitution only has jurisdiction over the Irish Republic. It does not have jurisdiction over N. Ireland, which remains part of the UK. Irish nationalists in Northern Ireland might, nevertheless, answer "Ireland" to the 'where are you from' question, but that's just identity mixed with an aspiration to unity. They are emphatically not from the entity described as 'Ireland' in the Irish constitution. The constitution of 1937 has no application where they live. They, and their unionist neighbours, are from "the island of" Ireland which again is distinct from the entity mentioned in the constitution of one section of that island.

Language should be used to clarify, not confuse matters.

I fail to see what is so difficult. There are 2 entities on a geographical feature of the same name. Saying you are Irish if you are from Northern Ireland is not necessarily a sign that you are a Sinn Fein member but can simply be a simple geographical reality.

It's exactly the same as Korea being two countries. The flip side of the coin is when a collective term gets appropriated by one group only. American usually denotes a US citizen but is technically accurate for people from 35 countries and several territories.

I have zero sympathy for people who don't know basic geography. The correct response when someone doesn't understand the difference between the Republic of Ireland, Northern Ireland and the island of Ireland is to laugh loudly in their face. For extra spice you should take out your phone and say you just have to put this on facebook and thank you for making my day.
« Last Edit: August 27, 2015, 08:07:00 am by englishrose »


  • kyndo
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    • March 03, 2011, 09:45:24 am
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Re: Funny Co-Teacher's Comments
« Reply #498 on: August 27, 2015, 08:16:20 am »

I have zero sympathy for people who don't know basic geography. The correct response when someone doesn't understand the difference between the Republic of Ireland, Northern Ireland and the island of Ireland is to laugh loudly in their face. For extra spice you should take out your phone and say you just have to put this on facebook and thank you for making my day.

I used to think the same way about people who couldn't grasp the difference between "The Netherlands" and "Holland".
Then I realized that it was basically just because nobody cared, and then I became sad.  :sad:


Re: Funny Co-Teacher's Comments
« Reply #499 on: August 27, 2015, 08:21:45 am »
NEWSFLASH: besides people from the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland, no-one really cares about the difference between the two. Most people don't even really care about the Irelands at all.

Realize that, and stop getting offended by it.