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  • EmMargaret
  • Waygookin

    • 23

    • December 15, 2011, 11:09:21 am
    • South Korea
Contract Accomodation
« on: June 01, 2012, 12:35:16 pm »
I'm not sure if this is even in the right section, I hope it is. I have been teaching in Korea for 7 months. The job that I applied for offered a single studio apartment, but when I got here, I was delighted that I had this wonderful two room apartment. I couldn't believe my luck. Now, one of the teachers has left to go to another job and the new teacher is going to be living with me. I have tried living with people before and I learned that I do better living alone. I feel that this a violation of the contract/job description. Any advice on what I should do?


  • cruisemonkey
  • Expert Waygook

    • 853

    • March 25, 2011, 02:17:57 pm
    • China
    more
Re: Contract Accomodation
« Reply #1 on: June 01, 2012, 01:11:39 pm »
Perhaps you should read your contract?
The Ks once gave me five minutes notice. I didn't know what to do with the extra time.


  • lenak
  • Adventurer

    • 26

    • September 22, 2011, 12:40:41 pm
    • Anyang
Re: Contract Accomodation
« Reply #2 on: June 01, 2012, 01:14:05 pm »
I agree with you that this is a violation of your contract and if I were in your place I would be livid. In your post you didn't say whether you were with a public school or a hogwan. Public school contracts offer single housing as well but if you don't like it , you get 400 a month towards another type of accomidation of your choosing. If you are in a public school, you can always tell your coteacher you are unhappy and if things don't change , you have the option of contacting your program coordinators.
 Hogwan contracts vary on this as far as I know. If you would like to live in a single apartment, which would include moving and possibly finding a very cramped and possibly less convinient place, I suggest you talk to your coteacher about and see if they can arrange that for you but I don't know who you would need to contact if that doesn't help.
You are in the right as this is stipulated in your contract. I wish you best of luck in this less than stellar situation.
-Ps- How does the other teacher feel about this? Do you guys have the same contract? Was he or she also expecting a single apartment before finding out they would be sharing? If he or she is equally annoyed perhaps you could talk to your coteacher together.


  • EmMargaret
  • Waygookin

    • 23

    • December 15, 2011, 11:09:21 am
    • South Korea
Re: Contract Accomodation
« Reply #3 on: June 01, 2012, 01:19:28 pm »
lenak, first, thank you for replying with advice rather than just negative comments. I am working in a hagwon :(
The other teacher is fine with it. First, she is Korean. She was hired in to replace the leaving teacher. She knew that when she signed the contract, she would be sharing housing. I am the only waygook in my school. The other teachers are Korean. Should I tell my boss that I agreed to a single or talk to my recruiter even though it has been 7 months?


  • cruisemonkey
  • Expert Waygook

    • 853

    • March 25, 2011, 02:17:57 pm
    • China
    more
Re: Contract Accomodation
« Reply #4 on: June 01, 2012, 01:30:38 pm »
You are in the right as this is stipulated in your contract.

Are you sure? The OP wrote "The job that I applied for offered a single studio apartment..." not "Article X of my contract states..."

Recruiters and advertisements will tell a prospective 'fish' anything... the only thing that counts is what the contract states.


OP,
What is the exact wording of your contract with regard to the 'Housing' article?
The Ks once gave me five minutes notice. I didn't know what to do with the extra time.


  • EmMargaret
  • Waygookin

    • 23

    • December 15, 2011, 11:09:21 am
    • South Korea
Re: Contract Accomodation
« Reply #5 on: June 01, 2012, 01:54:25 pm »
CLAUSE 12 (ACCOMMODATIONS)
제12항 (숙박 시설)

a. The school will provide the teacher with furnished accommodation.
a. 학원은 교사에게 가구가 구비된 숙박시설을 제공한다.
b. Furnishings being provided by the employer include: television, refrigerator, washing machine, bed,
wardrobe, fan, kitchen table, basic utensils, chairs, two-burner gas hot plate, and a telephone. The
teacher will be expected to provide his/her own pillow, pillowcase, and sheets, etc.
b. 고용주는 다음에 해당하는 비품을 제공한다: 텔레비전, 냉장고, 세탁기, 침대, 옷장, 선풍기, 식탁, 의자
(2개 이상), 기본 가제도구, 가정용 가스레인지, 전화기. 교사는 본인이 사용할 베개, 베개보, 침대보를
구비한다.
c. Selection of the apartment and its location is to be made by the employer, and will be made without consulting with
the teacher.
c. 숙박 장소의 결정은 고용주가 한다.
d. The deposit and monthly rent is the full responsibility of the employer.
d. 보증금과 월세는 고용주가 부담된다.
e. Any and all other living costs are to be the full responsibility of the teacher. (All utilities: gas, electricity, telephone,
cable, internet, etc.)
e. 관리비, 전화요금 및 기타 주거 설비의 사용으로 부과된 공과금(전기세, 수도세, 가스비, 케이블,
인터넷 등)은 교사가 부담한다.
f. For the first three months, the Employer will withhold a safety deposit of 100,000 Korean Won each month, for a total
deposit of 300,000 Korean Won. This deposit is used to pay off utility and telephone charges unpaid at the
resident, if any. After the employer clears all utilities and miscellaneous bills and conformation is received,
the deposit (minus any remaining dues) is to be returned to the teacher. However, if the total remaining dues
exceed the 300,000, the teacher is entirely responsible, and is to satisfy all debts with the employer and/or
utility companies.
f. 최초 3개월 동안 고용주는 교사의 월 급여에서 각 10만원씩을 보증금으로 차감한다. 보증금이란 계약 종료
후 발생하는 교사가 사용한 공과금을 지급하기 위한 금액이다.
g. Any and all unpaid balances of services utilized while residing at the furnished apartment is the
responsibility of the teacher.bills have been paid will be transferred to the teacherís account back home
two months after the termination of the contract.
g. 세금 지급 후 남는 차액은 계약 종료 2달 후에 교사의 은행계좌로 송금되도록 한다.

This is what my contract states regarding housing. Which is why I relied a lot on my recruiter to help in the job description. I was sent an email asking if I would mind living with another person and I said that I wanted to live on my own. The school, stated that that would not be a problem.


  • cruisemonkey
  • Expert Waygook

    • 853

    • March 25, 2011, 02:17:57 pm
    • China
    more
Re: Contract Accomodation
« Reply #6 on: June 01, 2012, 02:15:16 pm »
This is what my contract states regarding housing. Which is why I relied a lot on my recruiter to help in the job description. I was sent an email asking if I would mind living with another person and I said that I wanted to live on my own. The school, stated that that would not be a problem.

And apparently it wasn't... until now.

You should have written the word 'unshared' into sub-section a. between 'with' and 'furnished'.
The Ks once gave me five minutes notice. I didn't know what to do with the extra time.


Re: Contract Accomodation
« Reply #7 on: June 01, 2012, 02:26:25 pm »

c. Selection of the apartment and its location is to be made by the employer, and will be made without consulting with
the teacher.
c. 숙박 장소의 결정은 고용주가 한다.

 I was sent an email asking if I would mind living with another person and I said that I wanted to live on my own. The school, stated that that would not be a problem.

Should've had it put in your contract, then. As you can plainly see, it is not a violation of your contract.

Rule number one: If a recruiter or prospective employer asks you if X would be okay, with a certain job, and you say no.... you can expect that that job will eventually involve X, unless you have an adjustment to your contract made clarifying that you don't have to do X.

Also remember that recruiters, like realtors, have no reason not to lie to you. Did this 'statement from the school' come through the recruiter?

If so, I wouldn't kick up too much of a stink about this if I were you, since you have no way of knowing if your employer ever even agreed that you would have single housing. It sounds to me like they specificed with the recruiter that you may not at some point, and the recruiter asked about it to get your reaction, and then decided not to tell you, so as to land the fee. It may not be your employer's fault. Even if it did come from  your employer, at worst, they broke a promise. Unfortunately, based on your contract, it's a promse that is perfectly legal for them to break.

Talk to them and see if you could possibly get a bit of money toward your own place if you want, or if there's any way that they can understand that living with someone else is uncomfortable for you, because privacy is very important to Westerners or something. But if you're only going to be here for five more months, it's probably not even worth it. Especially if everything else about your job is pretty good. Five months is not that long. It sucks, but next time you'll know to check your contract.


  • SBracken
  • Expert Waygook

    • 579

    • March 07, 2011, 07:41:22 am
    • Pohang, S Korea
Re: Contract Accomodation
« Reply #8 on: June 01, 2012, 02:33:48 pm »
The wording definitely does not guarantee private livings, sorry T_T Your only chance is to try negotiating with your director....


  • lotte world
  • The Legend

    • 2272

    • August 22, 2011, 09:00:38 pm
    more
Re: Contract Accomodation
« Reply #9 on: June 01, 2012, 02:37:38 pm »
Gaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa aaaaahhhhhhhhhhhhhh hh!!!


Accommodation!!!
Accommodation!!!
Accommodation!!!

It's right up there with 'loose' when you mean 'lose'.


  • AC_in_Korea
  • Super Waygook

    • 263

    • July 30, 2010, 11:25:33 am
    • Miryang, South Korea
Re: Contract Accomodation
« Reply #10 on: June 01, 2012, 02:42:00 pm »
EmMargaret -

Because your actual contract does not mention anything about shared or single housing - I think you may not have much of a choice for the next 5 months. However -

You could tell your director that you are not comfortable sharing your apartment, especially since you have been on your own for 7 months already, and tell them that you understand you are in a two bedroom - and that you want to move to a single apartment rather than share.

I hope it works out.

All the best.
Be the change you want to see in the world.


  • JahRhythm
  • Fanatical Supporter!

    • 1122

    • May 25, 2011, 12:49:41 pm
    • Seoul
    more
Re: Contract Accomodation
« Reply #11 on: June 01, 2012, 08:17:02 pm »
lenak, first, thank you for replying with advice rather than just negative comments. I am working in a hagwon :(
The other teacher is fine with it. First, she is Korean. She was hired in to replace the leaving teacher. She knew that when she signed the contract, she would be sharing housing. I am the only waygook in my school. The other teachers are Korean. Should I tell my boss that I agreed to a single or talk to my recruiter even though it has been 7 months?

I find this response amusing because CruiseMonkey offered the correct response: check the exact language of your contract and share that do that others can advise.
But he was (horror) "negative" so it's dismissed.

Lenak is thanked for offering (yay!) positive advice even though it was useless.
Jumping to the conclusion that something is a breach of a contract without any knowledge of the contract...
Plus anyone spelling 학원 "hOgwon" has suspect credibility in my opinion.

Just points to a trend. People post and welcome the positives responders even if their "help" is useless and often misinformed, based on scant experience.
While the more prickly "negative" responders are grumbled about even though they often bring more thoughtful, useful and experienced feedback.
Smiley faces!!!
We teach EFL not ESL. Hagwon and "Private School" are not synonymous. Not everyone works in either a hagwon or public school. Immigration Question? Call 1345.


  • cruisemonkey
  • Expert Waygook

    • 853

    • March 25, 2011, 02:17:57 pm
    • China
    more
Re: Contract Accomodation
« Reply #12 on: June 02, 2012, 04:15:43 pm »
I do feel sorry for the OP... but sometimes the truth hurts.

I have trouble understanding how people will move half way around the world to another country with a different language, culture and laws, based on decisons made on the verbal reassurances of someone 'in business'. I'm suspicious of real estate agents and used car salesmen in my 'home country'.

No matter reassurances to the contrary, there are six 'fundamentals' of which all prospective newbies should be aware:

1. Never trust a recruiter.
2. If it's not written in the contract it doesn't exist.
3. A visa holder is not automatically granted a 'grace period' by Immigration in which to leave the country after expiry of the visa holder's period of sojourn.
4. You are subject to K law when in K-land eg. the truth is not an admissable defense to an accusation of lible or slander. This precept (whether statutory or commom law) holds for any soverign nation. 'Rights & Freedoms' conferred by one's country of citizenship do not apply.
5. There is no K legislation stating a FT must have a CT in the classroom.
6. Never take advice re: K law/Immigration on a website 'populated' by misinformed idiots (no matter how 'positive', or if it's what you want to hear).

There are statutory obligations as an E-2 visa holder:
1. You have 14 days to report a change of address to Immigration.
2. You have 14 days to report a change of passport number to Immigration.

The above are not secret and can be found with a modicum of 'Googling'.

EDIT: It is not unreasonable for an employer - anywhere in the world - to assume an employee has read (and understood) the terms of a contract before signing.  ::) Bear in mind in K-land, under statute, the governing language of any contract is Korean.

 
« Last Edit: June 02, 2012, 06:15:43 pm by cruisemonkey »
The Ks once gave me five minutes notice. I didn't know what to do with the extra time.