Read 4058 times

  • grajoker
  • Expert Waygook

    • 501

    • October 08, 2010, 09:02:27 am
    • yeoju korea


  • yangchj09
  • Newgookin

    • 4

    • May 24, 2012, 04:50:21 pm
    • koyang, kyung-Gi do
Re: Does South Korea really want peace with the North?
« Reply #1 on: May 28, 2012, 04:50:57 pm »
I think that most of poeple want peace with N.Korea If S.Korea have a war again, S.Korea couldn't grow like now


  • SpaceRook
  • Expert Waygook

    • 814

    • November 18, 2010, 11:54:36 am
    • South Korea
Re: Does South Korea really want peace with the North?
« Reply #2 on: May 28, 2012, 06:38:16 pm »
??? when I read this article it seems that there is a cover-up somewhere     
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/asia/northkorea/9289608/30-North-Korean-officials-involved-in-South-talks-die-in-traffic-accidents.html

Cover up of what? NORTH Korea is the one secretly executing their own diplomats.

Does South Korea want peace? Of course.  The uncertainty from the North is bad for the economy.   But does South Korea want re-unification? Some people do, some do not.



  • dansk
  • Veteran

    • 163

    • March 13, 2012, 12:26:55 pm
    • Inje-gun, Gangwon-do
Re: Does South Korea really want peace with the North?
« Reply #3 on: May 28, 2012, 06:56:37 pm »
Does South Korea want peace? Of course.  The uncertainty from the North is bad for the economy.
Sorry, I beg to differ.  South Korea wouldn't be the economic powerhouse that it is today if it hadn't been for the war and the prolonged period of tension that followed it.  That tension brought hundreds of billions of dollars in direct American aid money from the 50s through the 80s - that number, corrected for inflation, is not an exaggeration - not to mention the American military presence that has been more or less permanently posted here, or the preferential trading relationship this country has enjoyed with the States.

Not only that, but currently 120 South Korean corporations are getting rich by manufacturing products in Kaesong, across the DMZ, where they can pay factory workers vastly less than their domestic equivalents, and still take advantage of the inflated retail market here at home.

And what's more, as soon as unification happens, South Korea has to bear the cost of developing the North and integrating all those people, a process that will cost tens of trillions of dollars and take several decades to fully accomplish.

If you want my honest opinion, neither government actually wants peace.  The Kim dynasty falls if peace happens - which will likely involve a whole lot of rolling heads - and the South's economy will be depressed for years.  The governments of both countries are doing quite well with the situation as it is, it's only the people who are suffering.

And since when has a government ever had the best interests of its people at heart?


Re: Does South Korea really want peace with the North?
« Reply #4 on: May 28, 2012, 08:03:42 pm »
I haven't considered all the factors.  But it would be interesting how South Korea tries to enforce it's own laws in the North if such was to happen.  With the big illegal drug market in the North, all the fat headed military men who will try to become the next leader (I'm sure their lining up), China isn't to keen to have a major US ally having direct borders with it's underbelly, and the mass humanitarian cost.  Perhaps no one is looking forward to reunification anymore.  Perhaps a kind of proxy peace government will be implemented and the border will stay up.


  • flasyb
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1901

    • November 30, 2010, 12:10:03 pm
    • South Korea
Re: Does South Korea really want peace with the North?
« Reply #5 on: May 28, 2012, 09:10:22 pm »
All the South Koreans I've spoken to on this issue, in principle, back the idea of reunification. They want Korea to be one nation again. They want their people and their extended families to be reunited.

The problem is the cost. Estimates vary, and there's talk (if in hasn't already been introduced) of a "reunification tax" to raise $50 billion. That would be a small start.

Some guy muses on it here. In the whole article, he looks at East and West Germany's merge - the similarities and the differences.

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704340304574635180086832934.html

Quote
North Korea's per capita income is less than 5% of the South's. Each year the dollar value of South Korea's GDP expansion equals the entire North Korean economy. The North's population is half the South's and rising thanks to a high birth rate. North and South also barely trade with each other. To catch up to the South, North Korea will need more resources than East Germany required if living standards on both sides of the peninsula are to be close to each other.

More than a dozen reports by governments, academics and investment banks in recent years have attempted to estimate the cost of Korean unification. At the low end, the Rand Corporation estimates $50 billion. But that assumes only a doubling of Northern incomes from current levels, which would leave incomes in the North at less than 10% of the South.

At the high end, Credit Suisse estimated last year that unification would cost $1.5 trillion, but with North Korean incomes rising to only 60% of those in the South. I estimate that raising Northern incomes to 80% of Southern levels—which would likely be a political necessity—would cost anywhere from $2 trillion to $5 trillion, spread out over 30 years. That would work out to at least $40,000 per capita if distributed solely among South Koreans.

I remember the words of one Korean friend: "I want the North and South to be one. But in 10 years, maybe. It will be too expensive to do now. I cannot afford to pay." He doesn't have kids yet but they come into the equation. Plus, you're looking at a cost of anywhere from $10, 000 - $40,000 per working age South Korean.

I think the people of the South want reunification. The younger ones want it sooner. The older ones with cars, houses, and families, want it later. I suspect so they can push the cost, and the responsibility on. Their most immediate concern, as always, is their most immediate family.
In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act.

We are not "guests" in Korea. Korea didn't invite us over for Pimms in the garden. We are paid employees.


  • bawaugh
  • Super Waygook

    • 497

    • March 04, 2012, 08:49:30 pm
    • Geoje
    more
Re: Does South Korea really want peace with the North?
« Reply #6 on: May 28, 2012, 09:19:44 pm »
There would be a dividend for peace. Reduced army expenditure end of the draft large number of cheap laborors in the north etc.

But then how do you actually get peace in the first place without sending 1 million men over the DMZ?

The reunification of Germany was far easier.

You also have significant social differences between the two groups of people because of the years of living in a Cult (North Korea). These will not easily end over night. Throw in a possible terrorist underground similar to what went on in Iraq and re unification becomes quite difficult.

I guess for the Koreans they want reunification eventually in the future, when it will affect me less, when the north is richer, once I am out of the Army etc.
PV=nRT

Where
P is pressure
V is volume
n is number of moles
R is the gas constant
T is the temperature


  • flasyb
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1901

    • November 30, 2010, 12:10:03 pm
    • South Korea
Re: Does South Korea really want peace with the North?
« Reply #7 on: May 29, 2012, 01:01:14 am »
I guess for the Koreans they want reunification eventually in the future, when it will affect me less, when the north is richer, once I am out of the Army etc.

The problem is, as time goes on...

Quote
North Korea's per capita income is less than 5% of the South's. Each year the dollar value of South Korea's GDP expansion equals the entire North Korean economy.

...the South gets richer and the North gets, relatively, poorer.
In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act.

We are not "guests" in Korea. Korea didn't invite us over for Pimms in the garden. We are paid employees.


  • SpaceRook
  • Expert Waygook

    • 814

    • November 18, 2010, 11:54:36 am
    • South Korea
Re: Does South Korea really want peace with the North?
« Reply #8 on: May 29, 2012, 05:14:10 am »
Peace and reunification aren't the same thing.   Let us not confuse the issue.


Re: Does South Korea really want peace with the North?
« Reply #9 on: May 29, 2012, 09:21:20 am »
Peace and reunification aren't the same thing.   Let us not confuse the issue.

exactly. And I think there are VERY few South Koreans wanting war with the north.


  • dansk
  • Veteran

    • 163

    • March 13, 2012, 12:26:55 pm
    • Inje-gun, Gangwon-do
Re: Does South Korea really want peace with the North?
« Reply #10 on: May 29, 2012, 11:04:38 am »
I think that's the only way to go about it.  You have to have years of peace before unification can happen.  Open up full economic relations with the North, build their economy to the point where unification wouldn't be such a shock to the system.  It has to be gradual.


  • wrinklebump
  • Expert Waygook

    • 717

    • March 20, 2012, 01:31:12 pm
    • Ulsan, Korea via Detroit, Michigan
Re: Does South Korea really want peace with the North?
« Reply #11 on: May 29, 2012, 08:03:42 pm »
more likely that a shotgun-reunification is a gradual thawing of economic relations as the north liberalizes its economy in the coming decades. the kids we teach will probably be at their day jobs in the prime of their careers when unification finally happens.
Livin in a pathetic epidemic with schizophrenics buyin synthetic bodies on credit


  • Lurch
  • Expert Waygook

    • 727

    • September 05, 2011, 08:31:17 am
    • Chungju
Re: Does South Korea really want peace with the North?
« Reply #12 on: May 30, 2012, 07:26:19 am »
Ideally - yes, realistically - no.


  • Jrong
  • The Legend

    • 2381

    • April 28, 2011, 12:52:32 pm
    more
Re: Does South Korea really want peace with the North?
« Reply #13 on: May 30, 2012, 08:57:16 am »
Does South Korea want peace? Of course.  The uncertainty from the North is bad for the economy.
Sorry, I beg to differ.  South Korea wouldn't be the economic powerhouse that it is today if it hadn't been for the war and the prolonged period of tension that followed it.  That tension brought hundreds of billions of dollars in direct American aid money from the 50s through the 80s - that number, corrected for inflation, is not an exaggeration - not to mention the American military presence that has been more or less permanently posted here, or the preferential trading relationship this country has enjoyed with the States.

Not only that, but currently 120 South Korean corporations are getting rich by manufacturing products in Kaesong, across the DMZ, where they can pay factory workers vastly less than their domestic equivalents, and still take advantage of the inflated retail market here at home.

And what's more, as soon as unification happens, South Korea has to bear the cost of developing the North and integrating all those people, a process that will cost tens of trillions of dollars and take several decades to fully accomplish.

If you want my honest opinion, neither government actually wants peace.  The Kim dynasty falls if peace happens - which will likely involve a whole lot of rolling heads - and the South's economy will be depressed for years.  The governments of both countries are doing quite well with the situation as it is, it's only the people who are suffering.

And since when has a government ever had the best interests of its people at heart?
*like*


"When in doubt...ask Troglodyte" ~0mnslnd


  • JABU NXAU
  • Veteran

    • 169

    • June 03, 2011, 06:20:35 pm
    • KOREA
    more
Re: Does South Korea really want peace with the North?
« Reply #14 on: May 30, 2012, 09:48:17 am »
Does South Korea want peace? Of course.  The uncertainty from the North is bad for the economy.
Sorry, I beg to differ.  South Korea wouldn't be the economic powerhouse that it is today if it hadn't been for the war and the prolonged period of tension that followed it.  That tension brought hundreds of billions of dollars in direct American aid money from the 50s through the 80s - that number, corrected for inflation, is not an exaggeration - not to mention the American military presence that has been more or less permanently posted here, or the preferential trading relationship this country has enjoyed with the States.

Not only that, but currently 120 South Korean corporations are getting rich by manufacturing products in Kaesong, across the DMZ, where they can pay factory workers vastly less than their domestic equivalents, and still take advantage of the inflated retail market here at home.

And what's more, as soon as unification happens, South Korea has to bear the cost of developing the North and integrating all those people, a process that will cost tens of trillions of dollars and take several decades to fully accomplish.

If you want my honest opinion, neither government actually wants peace.  The Kim dynasty falls if peace happens - which will likely involve a whole lot of rolling heads - and the South's economy will be depressed for years.  The governments of both countries are doing quite well with the situation as it is, it's only the people who are suffering.

And since when has a government ever had the best interests of its people at heart?


 I agree there are huge profits to be made from war.
do your best always!