Read 4131 times

  • Random
  • Veteran

    • 169

    • May 23, 2011, 04:36:04 pm
    more
Let's talk karaoke after work.
« on: May 02, 2012, 11:07:12 am »
So I am a big fan of karaoke, especially with co-workers. I have no doubt that Korea will provide many opportunities for fun filled times.

I'm just wondering what are some of the songs you like to hit up when you go out with co-workers? What went over well? What went over really well? What song made them name their next child after you? That sort of thing. Looking for examples and just general discussion. Korean and English, but more Korean I think. Looking to prepare some pocket ace tracks before starting my position.

Normally I would just go with some kpop track I like, but that could be bad. While I would like to do E.Via's "오빠! 나 해도돼?" "Oppa! na haedodwea?" I imagine it would not go over as well as I would like. Might get me in trouble for being immature or some such. Guess I could fall back on "Gee" for laughs or some such...

What have been your experiences?


  • wrinklebump
  • Expert Waygook

    • 717

    • March 20, 2012, 01:31:12 pm
    • Ulsan, Korea via Detroit, Michigan
Re: Let's talk karaoke after work.
« Reply #1 on: May 02, 2012, 11:10:13 am »
id be happy to relate my experiences, if i only remembered them. but really, youve been to a noraebang before 3 a.m.?
Livin in a pathetic epidemic with schizophrenics buyin synthetic bodies on credit


  • Random
  • Veteran

    • 169

    • May 23, 2011, 04:36:04 pm
    more
Re: Let's talk karaoke after work.
« Reply #2 on: May 02, 2012, 11:14:13 am »
Nope. I'm not in Korea yet. I've gone with coworkers elsewhere.


Re: Let's talk karaoke after work.
« Reply #3 on: May 02, 2012, 03:33:07 pm »
I would avoid any slow ballad-type songs as it pretty much ruins vibe.
Koreans like to sing fast rhythm old-fashioned songs called 'Trot' or 트로트.
I would recommend you to learn a trot song or two for your next night out. Your co-workers, especially older ones will fall in love with you.
Recommended songs:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E0DDdpEjblU - 무조건 by 박상철
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XpwpP9BvhlU - 남행열차 by 김수희
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mfeh-R2XKEg - 어머나 by 장윤정

have a fun


  • Random
  • Veteran

    • 169

    • May 23, 2011, 04:36:04 pm
    more
Re: Let's talk karaoke after work.
« Reply #4 on: May 03, 2012, 03:53:20 am »
Ooooh. That looks like a lot of fun! Thanks so much! I especially like the third link.


  • Morticae
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1400

    • August 31, 2010, 12:45:33 pm
Re: Let's talk karaoke after work.
« Reply #5 on: May 03, 2012, 09:22:02 am »
There's a possibility that your co-workers will not be the karaoke type. Just be aware of that. I'm the same age as you, and MOST of the other teachers are my parents age and they have children who are my age. We get along, but we certainly aren't going to hang out. At staff dinners we might drink together, but that's as crazy as it gets.


  • Random
  • Veteran

    • 169

    • May 23, 2011, 04:36:04 pm
    more
Re: Let's talk karaoke after work.
« Reply #6 on: May 03, 2012, 11:50:39 am »
Fair point, to be honest I hadn't even considered that. Thanks for the realistic point of view I needed. Guess we will just see what unfolds.


  • Chadwickhhs
  • Expert Waygook

    • 797

    • February 28, 2012, 07:04:14 pm
    more
Re: Let's talk karaoke after work.
« Reply #7 on: May 03, 2012, 11:57:23 am »
I never sing Kpop. It's all classic rock or pop songs. Maroon5 is big even over here. Queen is always a safe pick. The more flair the better.

And as Morticae said, it's possible but less likely you'll be jamming with your teachers. I haven't. But there's likely ex-pats that know the same songs as you who will join you.


  • Random
  • Veteran

    • 169

    • May 23, 2011, 04:36:04 pm
    more
Re: Let's talk karaoke after work.
« Reply #8 on: May 03, 2012, 12:58:42 pm »
I'm sure if I look for it I can find it. My recruiter just told me to bone up on my karaoke. Do the karaoke places carry Chinese/Japanese tracks like the KTVs do in China?


  • Chadwickhhs
  • Expert Waygook

    • 797

    • February 28, 2012, 07:04:14 pm
    more
Re: Let's talk karaoke after work.
« Reply #9 on: May 03, 2012, 01:02:14 pm »
In my experience yes, they do.


  • Random
  • Veteran

    • 169

    • May 23, 2011, 04:36:04 pm
    more
Re: Let's talk karaoke after work.
« Reply #10 on: May 03, 2012, 01:33:12 pm »
Not going to lie, kind of sad this thread isn't getting more play. Had hoped a few more people would be into karaoke.

I usually get a lot of positives from "Love Song" by Khalil Fong (方大同) as well as "Bang!" by After School.

"Magic Girl" by Orange Caramel is great for laughs though, especially as a waeg.


  • Morticae
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1400

    • August 31, 2010, 12:45:33 pm
Re: Let's talk karaoke after work.
« Reply #11 on: May 03, 2012, 02:06:18 pm »
Fair point, to be honest I hadn't even considered that. Thanks for the realistic point of view I needed. Guess we will just see what unfolds.

On a positive note, although your fellow teachers may not wish to sing with you, you can still find Korean friends your age who are into that sort of thing. I don't have any foreign friends, only Korean friends. So, it's certainly possible. At 25, we are most likely to mesh with the University aged crowd. So if you're near a University, you can meet some people that way. In my experience, once you obtain one good friend, they can open you up to several other friends. Koreans like to gather in groups. The singing often comes after you visit a few different bars.

I don't like to sing, so I can't really contribute suggestions in that sense. But hopefully what I said helped you in some way.


  • Random
  • Veteran

    • 169

    • May 23, 2011, 04:36:04 pm
    more
Re: Let's talk karaoke after work.
« Reply #12 on: May 03, 2012, 02:15:12 pm »
I suppose it is okay to derail my own thread a bit. I was wondering...

I don't drink. On the occasions I do drink, I like what are commonly called "lady drinks" (or so I am told) like a cosmo, appletini, etc. I don't like the taste of alcohol, and really enjoy sweet drinks where I can't taste it. I do not know much about soju, but the one sold in my town here in the states is any indication... the smell of it alone makes me sick. Couple that with my not being a skilled drinker (but I know when to quit, it is just usually only 2-4 drinks in, tops) and I am wonder how badly my social life and friend making are going to be impacted.


  • wrinklebump
  • Expert Waygook

    • 717

    • March 20, 2012, 01:31:12 pm
    • Ulsan, Korea via Detroit, Michigan
Re: Let's talk karaoke after work.
« Reply #13 on: May 03, 2012, 02:41:35 pm »
I suppose it is okay to derail my own thread a bit. I was wondering...

I don't drink. On the occasions I do drink, I like what are commonly called "lady drinks" (or so I am told) like a cosmo, appletini, etc. I don't like the taste of alcohol, and really enjoy sweet drinks where I can't taste it. I do not know much about soju, but the one sold in my town here in the states is any indication... the smell of it alone makes me sick. Couple that with my not being a skilled drinker (but I know when to quit, it is just usually only 2-4 drinks in, tops) and I am wonder how badly my social life and friend making are going to be impacted.

 :o :o :o

cancel trip
Livin in a pathetic epidemic with schizophrenics buyin synthetic bodies on credit


  • Morticae
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1400

    • August 31, 2010, 12:45:33 pm
Re: Let's talk karaoke after work.
« Reply #14 on: May 03, 2012, 02:57:36 pm »
I suppose it is okay to derail my own thread a bit. I was wondering...

I don't drink. On the occasions I do drink, I like what are commonly called "lady drinks" (or so I am told) like a cosmo, appletini, etc. I don't like the taste of alcohol, and really enjoy sweet drinks where I can't taste it. I do not know much about soju, but the one sold in my town here in the states is any indication... the smell of it alone makes me sick. Couple that with my not being a skilled drinker (but I know when to quit, it is just usually only 2-4 drinks in, tops) and I am wonder how badly my social life and friend making are going to be impacted.

Ahhh... that's a predicament. Korea is a heavy drinking culture.

I have lived here for 2 years and I'm not a drinker either, but I must do it on occasion to maintain relationships. In my experience, people often associate drinking a lot with being a strong, good guy.

I don't go out and try to drink, but if I'm at a staff dinner and somebody hands me a glass and fills it with Soju... there's no way I'm going to take the chance of offending them. I'll "one shot" that vile rubbing alcohol concoction, wipe the glass, hand the glass back to them and fill it. That's the correct way in Korean culture. Then I'll continue drinking some water.

I have never been to a place where they serve those sugary style of drinks. There are 3 kinds of alcohol Koreans like to drink:
1) Beer
2) Soju
3) Makgeolli

Sometimes they combine 1 & 2, Beer + Soju.

TBH, I wouldn't stress about it too much.


  • Chadwickhhs
  • Expert Waygook

    • 797

    • February 28, 2012, 07:04:14 pm
    more
Re: Let's talk karaoke after work.
« Reply #15 on: May 03, 2012, 03:03:54 pm »
wrinkle's being dramatic. Most of the ex-pats in my area are minimal drinkers and no one gives them trouble about it. It may not help you meet people but it shouldn't make you suddenly hated. They serve cocktails at western style bars in major cities.

Also I have no idea what any of those songs you posted are thus I have no idea how they'll work with the locals. I bring my American and English rock and roll with me. If a Korean sees me noraebangin' I'm gonna dazzle in my element. Gonna keep the hot pants in storage.


  • Random
  • Veteran

    • 169

    • May 23, 2011, 04:36:04 pm
    more
Re: Let's talk karaoke after work.
« Reply #16 on: May 03, 2012, 03:20:22 pm »
I suppose it is okay to derail my own thread a bit. I was wondering...

I don't drink. On the occasions I do drink, I like what are commonly called "lady drinks" (or so I am told) like a cosmo, appletini, etc. I don't like the taste of alcohol, and really enjoy sweet drinks where I can't taste it. I do not know much about soju, but the one sold in my town here in the states is any indication... the smell of it alone makes me sick. Couple that with my not being a skilled drinker (but I know when to quit, it is just usually only 2-4 drinks in, tops) and I am wonder how badly my social life and friend making are going to be impacted.

Ahhh... that's a predicament. Korea is a heavy drinking culture.

I have lived here for 2 years and I'm not a drinker either, but I must do it on occasion to maintain relationships. In my experience, people often associate drinking a lot with being a strong, good guy.

I don't go out and try to drink, but if I'm at a staff dinner and somebody hands me a glass and fills it with Soju... there's no way I'm going to take the chance of offending them. I'll "one shot" that vile rubbing alcohol concoction, wipe the glass, hand the glass back to them and fill it. That's the correct way in Korean culture. Then I'll continue drinking some water.

I have never been to a place where they serve those sugary style of drinks. There are 3 kinds of alcohol Koreans like to drink:
1) Beer
2) Soju
3) Makgeolli

Sometimes they combine 1 & 2, Beer + Soju.

TBH, I wouldn't stress about it too much.

Not a beer drinker, soju is horrifying. Makgeolli tastes a bit like a White Russian to me. Oh well. I suppose I'll sink or swim when the time comes. Good thing drinking is associated with being a strong guy, wonder how much drinking it will take to offset my manicure.

To be fair, I am coming in knowing it is a pro-drinking culture, I was just wondering how much of that was serious business and how much of it was hearsay. Thanks for clearing things up for me.


  • Random
  • Veteran

    • 169

    • May 23, 2011, 04:36:04 pm
    more
Re: Let's talk karaoke after work.
« Reply #17 on: May 03, 2012, 03:31:18 pm »
wrinkle's being dramatic. Most of the ex-pats in my area are minimal drinkers and no one gives them trouble about it. It may not help you meet people but it shouldn't make you suddenly hated. They serve cocktails at western style bars in major cities.

Also I have no idea what any of those songs you posted are thus I have no idea how they'll work with the locals. I bring my American and English rock and roll with me. If a Korean sees me noraebangin' I'm gonna dazzle in my element. Gonna keep the hot pants in storage.

Nice to know one can get along being a minimal drinker.

Eh, I posted a Chinese song and some Korean songs. I figured if I am in their noraebang, might as well sing a few of their songs.

Begs the question where you store your hot pants though, and what song brings them out.


  • wrinklebump
  • Expert Waygook

    • 717

    • March 20, 2012, 01:31:12 pm
    • Ulsan, Korea via Detroit, Michigan
Re: Let's talk karaoke after work.
« Reply #18 on: May 03, 2012, 04:50:21 pm »
slurring journey songs after 1 or 7 too many pohktanju with a group commensurately sloshed koreans is one of lifes great pleasures. especially if theyre paying for the embarassed chomishi.

you could enjoy yourself in korea without drinking, but to me thats a bit like ordering the salad at a rib shack.
Livin in a pathetic epidemic with schizophrenics buyin synthetic bodies on credit


  • Yegob
  • Veteran

    • 213

    • March 11, 2011, 08:12:41 am
    • S. Korea
Re: Let's talk karaoke after work.
« Reply #19 on: May 03, 2012, 05:46:47 pm »
when you go singing with your fellow teachers one time. and they're all appropriately sloshed (highly likely), don't be surprised if some ajosshi starts dancing with you to a slow song, or even do a little bump and grind topped off by squeezeing your buttocks.

it's amazing what a lot of soju can do.

happened to me once and to say I was shocked is an understatement. Kept my cool/composure though and then made sure to stay away from that guy.