Read 15513 times

  • 0mnslnd
  • Expert Waygook

    • 677

    • June 03, 2011, 08:10:01 am
Having a Car in Korea - questions about fines and tax
« on: March 13, 2012, 06:36:51 pm »
Apologies if there is another thread for this.

Fines-
When is the latest date for paying a parking fine?
What happens if you don't pay a fine?
Can you be exonerated for a fine, if you can prove that is was given unfairly?

Tax-
When is the latest date for paying car tax in Korea?
What happens if you don't pay?

I know there is a 'red date' on the bill, together with an outstanding amount, which is a little higher than the "blue date" (recommended date of pay). But what happens after the red date? Does the fine just increase bit by bit, month after month?

Please advise
Out. Never been happier


  • Janitor
  • Moderator - LVL 2

    • 959

    • June 14, 2010, 02:01:32 pm
    • Ulsan
Re: Having a Car in Korea - questions about fines and tax
« Reply #1 on: March 14, 2012, 08:57:56 am »
Well for the fines, if you don't pay they will get added on to your car, not the license and that means should you decide to sell the car, you will have to pay those fines. Also, if they spot your car, i.e. the traffic patrol vans that seem to be popping up more and more these days, they will leave a red note stating that you have outstanding fines and that you must pay them.

As for the the taxes and insurance the fines are heavy. If you don't pay your tax the fine can be up to 500,000 won at least in my area. So it is not something to mess around with. However, I have also met people that have been driving around with unregistered/uninsured cars and nothing has happened to them except for the looming fact that if they get into an accident there will be hell to pay.

That is the main thing you have to think about. If you pay your fees and something happens, you are looked after. If you don't, well that is when they get creative with the fines. I had a friend who had to pay over 600,000 won in additional fees because not only was he not insured but the lady in the car that he lightly tapped (no damage to either car) said that she was pregnant and demanded that she be compensated for the trip to the hospital to make sure her invisible baby was alright. The police and insurance people thought that this was acceptable. So that is something to think about when weighing the options to either pay or not. 


  • 0mnslnd
  • Expert Waygook

    • 677

    • June 03, 2011, 08:10:01 am
Re: Having a Car in Korea - questions about fines and tax
« Reply #2 on: March 14, 2012, 01:02:25 pm »
Thank you very much, this helps me a lot. Appreciate your response.

I'm gonna pay my car taxes asap, but the fines are gonna have to wait. It's a little harsh to pay everything at once. As long as the fines don't need to be paid that urgently.
Out. Never been happier


  • samitut
  • Waygookin

    • 20

    • February 21, 2012, 12:45:18 pm
    • Seoul
Re: Having a Car in Korea - questions about fines and tax
« Reply #3 on: March 15, 2012, 09:53:07 am »
PARKING FINES:
The latest date for paying a parking fine will be on the bill you have recieved. Check the date you have to pay. If you do not pay a fine, then your car will get under attachment and a record will be left. When you plan to sell or scrap your car you won't be able to, because a record will remain that your car is under attachment.

When the fine gets higher due to unpayment, your license plate might get removed untill you pay a fine.

You are able to object that you have been fined unfairly during the 'objection period' which is written on the bill. However the objection is not always accepted.

TAX:
It is paid twice an year.(June and December). You can get some discount if you pay it earlier at once. For Seoul 01.15-01.31 is the period to get a 10% discount. For other regions it is 01.01-01.31.
You can pay it online at http://etax.seoul.go.kr. It has English version, however you will probably need electronic sign.

If you do not pay the tax, there is no fine, instead you will have to pay additional tax.
Also your property may also get attached if it is spotted. The worst case is this: From the Dong or Gu Ofiice they can come at night to the registered address of your car, and they can take your car's plate out.
In order to be able to sell or scrap your car in the future, you will have to pay your tax in time.

INSURANCE
Insurance has a much more clean process. Nobody follows your car. However
, I have also met people that have been driving around with unregistered/uninsured cars and nothing has happened to them except for the looming fact that if they get into an accident there will be hell to pay.
So that is something to think about when weighing the options to either pay or not. 
Keeping this in mind , the fine for not having your car insured is ; for the first 10 days : 15,000 won. After 10 days, 6000 won/day applies. The max amount is 900,000 won per year. And again you will have to pay this while selling or scraping your car.


  • 0mnslnd
  • Expert Waygook

    • 677

    • June 03, 2011, 08:10:01 am
Re: Having a Car in Korea - questions about fines and tax
« Reply #4 on: March 19, 2012, 01:53:55 pm »
Thank you. I guess I'll have to pay up then. I don't mind paying insurance, but all the other stuff adds up to be really expensive.

Whoa, they literally come and take your  number plate off?
Out. Never been happier


  • herbie
  • Waygookin

    • 20

    • March 02, 2012, 02:46:30 pm
    • Busan
Re: Having a Car in Korea - questions about fines and tax
« Reply #5 on: April 14, 2012, 08:16:50 am »
From a buyer's perspective, is there a way to check if the car has any outstanding tax or fine? I read that I need to go to a gu's office to do so. In the uk, you can pay and get it done online.

Thanks a lot


  • 0mnslnd
  • Expert Waygook

    • 677

    • June 03, 2011, 08:10:01 am
Re: Having a Car in Korea - questions about fines and tax
« Reply #6 on: April 14, 2012, 01:41:47 pm »
From a buyer's perspective, is there a way to check if the car has any outstanding tax or fine? I read that I need to go to a gu's office to do so. In the uk, you can pay and get it done online.

Thanks a lot

I don't know how to check outstanding fines, but I know you can check outstanding tax (car and otherwise) with internet banking in Korea. Go to the pay tax section on your internet banking
Out. Never been happier


  • popeye2u
  • Expert Waygook

    • 875

    • April 05, 2011, 09:45:37 am
    • S of N. Korea
Re: Having a Car in Korea - questions about fines and tax
« Reply #7 on: April 18, 2012, 08:23:25 am »
I'm in the same boat.  I've been driving without insurance for several years.  I decided to drop it when I got hit by a lady and insurance failed to do anything.  She just drove off without an apology even though she had more damage to her car.  I moved so they havent found me yet to assess fees.  Eventually will just abandon car somewhere before I leave Korea.
Illegally Screwed By Employers in Korea:  https://www.facebook.com/groups/1628928127347749/


Re: Having a Car in Korea - questions about fines and tax
« Reply #8 on: October 12, 2015, 10:31:29 pm »
On Monday morning I found a document under my wiper and my front numberplate missing. My car was parked at my girlfriends place where I live most of the time. The car is registered with the apartment parking office, however it is not my official residence and not the address where my car is registered to.

I hadn't received any fines in the mail, but when I checked efine.go.kr, I found 12 traffic violations from the last year, totalling 600,000 won.

My insurance has my correct address, immigration has my address, I am registered with my local gu office. For some reason they couldn't send me the fines, but they could find my car when it was parked at location other than my official one.

I'm annoyed. With myself mostly which makes it worse. $@%@*&@* *&@$9


  • seoil
  • Veteran

    • 221

    • September 09, 2013, 02:31:04 pm
Re: Having a Car in Korea - questions about fines and tax
« Reply #9 on: October 13, 2015, 08:03:05 am »
On Monday morning I found a document under my wiper and my front numberplate missing. My car was parked at my girlfriends place where I live most of the time. The car is registered with the apartment parking office, however it is not my official residence and not the address where my car is registered to.

I hadn't received any fines in the mail, but when I checked efine.go.kr, I found 12 traffic violations from the last year, totalling 600,000 won.

My insurance has my correct address, immigration has my address, I am registered with my local gu office. For some reason they couldn't send me the fines, but they could find my car when it was parked at location other than my official one.

I'm annoyed. With myself mostly which makes it worse. $@%@*&@* *&@$9

I seriously doubt all 12 traffic violations happened last year and no one officially tried to make contact with you. I am guessing some of those fines are just ways to meet dept. quotas. 

About 2 years ago I got a phantom speeding ticket that was apparently several months old. And the police station sent the ticket to my previous employer who in turn sent it to my current employer. I was like why didn't they send this ticket to me? I am registered with immigration, DMV, and local residence district office. Their answer was the only address we have at the police station is the original address on your first alien registratoin card. From X amount of years ago.

Basically I told them I would need to see a photo from the speed cam and that this ticket barely has any info like a time stamp, it only has just a date. Eventually they produced a picture but no one could prove one way or another if I was speeding or not so they dropped the late fees and I just paid the basic 35,000 won.  I gather they were fishing for "dumb foriegners" who would just pay tickets from months ago because they a) wouldn't remember the date in time
b) would have deleted any blackbox video

In an unrelated event, I got a parking ticket at Emart  and got ticketed with photo and all the information within 10days of the event. which I remembered clearly and paid promptly apparently parking tickets are handled by another branch of city govt and not the police. I don't trust police stations here. They handle their own ticketing and I think they need funds.
« Last Edit: October 13, 2015, 08:07:44 am by seoil »


Re: Having a Car in Korea - questions about fines and tax
« Reply #10 on: October 14, 2015, 03:23:43 pm »
Why would anyone drive without insurance here or back home?  How stupid and pathetic are people? 


  • nomadicmadda
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1585

    • July 01, 2014, 06:49:40 am
    • Seoul, formerly Boseong
    more
Re: Having a Car in Korea - questions about fines and tax
« Reply #11 on: October 14, 2015, 03:30:36 pm »
I'm in the same boat.  I've been driving without insurance for several years.  I decided to drop it when I got hit by a lady and insurance failed to do anything.  She just drove off without an apology even though she had more damage to her car.  I moved so they havent found me yet to assess fees.  Eventually will just abandon car somewhere before I leave Korea.

I was charged over a million KRW for my yearly insurance.  This past spring my tire blew out and cost me another million in bullshit repairs to my undercarriage and front bumper.  Guess what insurance covered?  F*cking nothing.  Apparently I'm paying for if I do damage to someone else's body or car, and maybe for my own bodily damage, but they don't pay jack shit for my own car.  Was livid.


  • VanIslander
  • Moderator LVL 1

    • 2422

    • June 02, 2011, 10:12:19 am
    • Seogwipo, Jeju Island
    more
Re: Having a Car in Korea - questions about fines and tax
« Reply #12 on: October 15, 2015, 08:42:05 pm »
Since 2008 I have been ignoring speeding tickets and parking tickets and diesel tax bills (I drive a cool black-tinted Mercedes-Benz engine Korando (there's no sunglasses icon?).

I have noticed no negative effects of my behaviour, except for more mail to throw in the garbage. Even re-newing my driver's license was easy peasy cheapy quickie.

Some days I think I'd like to pay what I've been fined with. But many of my tickets are from other provinces in Korea I taught in during the last decade and have no record of (threw the bills int he trash at some point).

I suspect I probably owe between 700,000 and 1.5 million won in fines over the years (I have had my Korando for 7 years and have put 100,000 kms on it, speeding and parking here there and everywhere).

Oh well.


  • Jgrat
  • Super Waygook

    • 485

    • May 16, 2011, 06:14:29 am
    • Siheung
Re: Having a Car in Korea - questions about fines and tax
« Reply #13 on: October 16, 2015, 08:10:05 am »

I was charged over a million KRW for my yearly insurance.  This past spring my tire blew out and cost me another million in bullshit repairs to my undercarriage and front bumper.  Guess what insurance covered?  F*cking nothing.  Apparently I'm paying for if I do damage to someone else's body or car, and maybe for my own bodily damage, but they don't pay jack shit for my own car.  Was livid.

Damn, I pay about 420,000 and that's with extras. What are you driving?


  • yfb
  • Expert Waygook

    • 864

    • July 05, 2010, 11:50:12 am
Re: Having a Car in Korea - questions about fines and tax
« Reply #14 on: October 16, 2015, 08:46:17 am »
I'm in the same boat.  I've been driving without insurance for several years.  I decided to drop it when I got hit by a lady and insurance failed to do anything.  She just drove off without an apology even though she had more damage to her car.  I moved so they havent found me yet to assess fees.  Eventually will just abandon car somewhere before I leave Korea.

Good luck with that. The next time someone crashes into you they're going to be playing up their injuries and be racking up hospital bills. And you're going to be responsible for every won of that. You also can't leave the country with a judgement against you.


Re: Having a Car in Korea - questions about fines and tax
« Reply #15 on: October 16, 2015, 08:49:28 am »
From a buyer's perspective, is there a way to check if the car has any outstanding tax or fine? I read that I need to go to a gu's office to do so. In the uk, you can pay and get it done online.

Thanks a lot

I don't know how to check outstanding fines, but I know you can check outstanding tax (car and otherwise) with internet banking in Korea. Go to the pay tax section on your internet banking

You can actually go to the DMV in your area and they can print out a list of your tickets as well as give you the number to call to find out out much interest/tax/penalities have accrued on it. They can also get your tax information as well for your vehicle. The best part is that they will send you a message and their bank account number to use the computer at the DMV to pay for it right away (all for their convenience in collecting that money!).


  • ado
  • Adventurer

    • 58

    • August 30, 2012, 07:58:30 am
    • Yeongwol
Re: Having a Car in Korea - questions about fines and tax
« Reply #16 on: October 16, 2015, 09:47:58 am »
Since 2008 I have been ignoring speeding tickets and parking tickets and diesel tax bills (I drive a cool black-tinted Mercedes-Benz engine Korando (there's no sunglasses icon?).

I have noticed no negative effects of my behaviour, except for more mail to throw in the garbage. Even re-newing my driver's license was easy peasy cheapy quickie.

Some days I think I'd like to pay what I've been fined with. But many of my tickets are from other provinces in Korea I taught in during the last decade and have no record of (threw the bills int he trash at some point).

I suspect I probably owe between 700,000 and 1.5 million won in fines over the years (I have had my Korando for 7 years and have put 100,000 kms on it, speeding and parking here there and everywhere).

Oh well.

You'll just pay when you sell/scrap the car. All fines are logged against your car and you'll have to pay before you change owners unless you take the tags off and abandon the car.


Re: Having a Car in Korea - questions about fines and tax
« Reply #17 on: October 16, 2015, 09:56:49 am »
Since 2008 I have been ignoring speeding tickets and parking tickets and diesel tax bills (I drive a cool black-tinted Mercedes-Benz engine Korando (there's no sunglasses icon?).

I have noticed no negative effects of my behaviour, except for more mail to throw in the garbage. Even re-newing my driver's license was easy peasy cheapy quickie.

Some days I think I'd like to pay what I've been fined with. But many of my tickets are from other provinces in Korea I taught in during the last decade and have no record of (threw the bills int he trash at some point).

I suspect I probably owe between 700,000 and 1.5 million won in fines over the years (I have had my Korando for 7 years and have put 100,000 kms on it, speeding and parking here there and everywhere).

Oh well.

What a rebel.  8)


Re: Having a Car in Korea - questions about fines and tax
« Reply #18 on: October 16, 2015, 12:41:20 pm »
I seriously doubt all 12 traffic violations happened last year and no one officially tried to make contact with you. I am guessing some of those fines are just ways to meet dept. quotas.

They were legit. You could see photos on the website. I assume they tried but failed to send the fines to my correct address.

Since 2008 I have been ignoring speeding tickets and parking tickets and diesel tax bills (I drive a cool black-tinted Mercedes-Benz engine Korando (there's no sunglasses icon?).
...

I also drive a Korando!

What you may not know, and I just found out, is that your car will be flagged and the license plate number given to people or companies whose job it is to find those cars - like a bounty hunter (a korean friend saw a TV reality show about these guys). How they find your car, I don't know, but when they do they will remove the front license plate, leave a document on the windscreen telling you to pick it up from the local police station once you have paid those fines. Getting caught driving without the front plate will incur more fines.

I don't know how they found mine at my girlfriend's apartment parking lot, but I suspect that the building super had something to do with it. I see them writing down numberplates, for their own administrative purposes I'm sure, but those lists of numbers would be worth money to bounty hunters, and someone has probably figured that out. Those security guys get paid peanuts and exploited by the placement companies, so I don't blame them.

Edit: I suppose you could attach your plates with some kind of industrial adhesive!

Useful info alert! --> check out www.efine.go.kr

It will list all your outstanding traffic fines. It's korean language only, so get some help if you need it.

Also my Woori internet banking has a fines section for all government fines, taxes etc, but only in the korean language section, so check that out as well if you want to make sure you're in the clear.
« Last Edit: October 16, 2015, 12:50:48 pm by Nuclear Wiener »


Re: Having a Car in Korea - questions about fines and tax
« Reply #19 on: October 16, 2015, 12:54:29 pm »
I seriously doubt all 12 traffic violations happened last year and no one officially tried to make contact with you. I am guessing some of those fines are just ways to meet dept. quotas.

They were legit. You could see photos on the website. I assume they tried but failed to send the fines to my correct address.

Since 2008 I have been ignoring speeding tickets and parking tickets and diesel tax bills (I drive a cool black-tinted Mercedes-Benz engine Korando (there's no sunglasses icon?).
...

I also drive a Korando!

What you may not know, and I just found out, is that your car will be flagged and the license plate number given to people or companies whose job it is to find those cars - like a bounty hunter (a korean friend saw a TV reality show about these guys). How they find your car, I don't know, but when they do they will remove the front license plate, leave a document on the windscreen telling you to pick it up from the local police station once you have paid those fines. Getting caught driving without the front plate will incur more fines.

I don't know how they found mine at my girlfriend's apartment parking lot, but I suspect that the building super had something to do with it. I see them writing down numberplates, for their own administrative purposes I'm sure, but those lists of numbers would be worth money to bounty hunters, and someone has probably figured that out. Those security guys get paid peanuts and exploited by the placement companies, so I don't blame them.

Edit: I suppose you could attach your plates with some kind of industrial adhesive!

Useful info alert! --> check out www.efine.go.kr

It will list all your outstanding traffic fines. It's korean language only, so get some help if you need it.

Also my Woori internet banking has a fines section for all government fines, taxes etc, but only in the korean language section, so check that out as well if you want to make sure you're in the clear.

If you're not going to pay the fines anyway cos you're a bad ass. You might as well just throw some fake plates on the car and never get caught.