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  • yeti08
  • Super Waygook

    • 388

    • July 03, 2011, 12:58:29 pm
    • Anyang
Pink Eye
« on: October 21, 2011, 03:46:22 pm »
So, a student comes into class with both eyes seeping, swollen, and red.  I asked if she has been to a doctor she replies no as she is rubbing her eyes... 
I go and ask the principal if they are sending her home.  Nope.  She said she called the mother and the mother asked her daughter (Elementary Grade 5) if she wanted to see a doctor.  Her kid said no, so the mother didn't take her.  Awesome.  Is there any law against children coming unmedicated for pink eye?  There was in Pennsylvania, they had to have a script for the eye drops that greatly reduce the risk of it being contagious.

Gotta love Korea, where spreading disease is a-okay as long as you're seen as diligent. 


  • kagayuzen
  • Adventurer

    • 67

    • June 03, 2011, 03:00:20 pm
    • Sihueng, South Korea
Re: Pink Eye
« Reply #1 on: October 21, 2011, 03:51:51 pm »
In Korea, I don't think there are any laws against kids coming in with pink eye. I imagine if he had H1N1 he would still "have to" come in. Though, I urge that you try and convince someone (principle, co-teachers, ect.) to have them go to the doctor. She can easily infect other people, especially if she's rubbing her eyes.

Sometimes Korea is ridiculous about working when they're ready to drop dead. One of my co-teachers came to school with pneumonia!


  • yeti08
  • Super Waygook

    • 388

    • July 03, 2011, 12:58:29 pm
    • Anyang
Re: Pink Eye
« Reply #2 on: October 21, 2011, 04:41:46 pm »
The principal said the damage was done essentially. . . and doesn't want to cause the mother problems.  A Korean co-teacher and I both asked her without prior planning. 
What's more is the other NET was forced to go to the doctor on Monday because his eye was red.  He tried saying he got something in it earlier, which was probably true.  She said maybe children will tell their parents you're sick.  ::) 
The doctor confirmed it wasn't pink eye, but gave him some drops.

So, teachers have to go, but parents shouldn't be bothered and thus can infect staff and fellow students.  Logic at it's finest.


  • michelleh
  • Adventurer

    • 63

    • September 30, 2010, 08:47:49 am
    • Seoul, South Korea
Re: Pink Eye
« Reply #3 on: October 21, 2011, 06:22:03 pm »
At my school, there's usually a pink eye epidemic around this time of year, and students are ordered to stay home. The only exception is if they are taking tests, in which case, they're isolated from the other students in a special classroom.

Last year, I noticed that some of my classes were unusually quiet, and that for some reason all the 'usual suspects' were missing because of pink eye. Jokingly, I said to my co-teacher, 'Ha! They must be giving it to each other deliberately.' And she, in complete seriousness, replied, 'Yes, I saw them touching their friends' eyes in the hallways.'  My reaction was something like :o  :D


Re: Pink Eye
« Reply #4 on: October 21, 2011, 07:16:40 pm »
You want the mother to spend time at home watching her kid all day?  Get real.


  • kagayuzen
  • Adventurer

    • 67

    • June 03, 2011, 03:00:20 pm
    • Sihueng, South Korea
Re: Pink Eye
« Reply #5 on: October 21, 2011, 07:47:28 pm »
So, teachers have to go, but parents shouldn't be bothered and thus can infect staff and fellow students.  Logic at it's finest.

More like Korean logic. For real. This is the reason why there's a vicious cycle of germ-sharing, illness, suffering, ect. Like when I got bronchitis, it was because a kid was already hacking and coughing all over the place, without a care whom or where he's coughing on. Then after the bronchitis, barely 2 weeks past and I'm sick again   :laugh:


Re: Pink Eye
« Reply #6 on: October 21, 2011, 11:28:37 pm »
after a month or so of starting in my new school, a lot of the kids had pink eye really bad (there were pink-eye groups looking in thru the classroom window). They were all sent to the local hospital, but in the end they all came back treated. I suppose my point is, wash your own hands and be careful; there were about a dozen kids with pink eye but i avoided contamination.


Re: Pink Eye
« Reply #7 on: October 22, 2011, 08:30:48 am »
Pinkeye swept through my school last month, once-infected kids pointing and laughing at their friends "Teacher I give!"  I think that there are actually laws about kids missing school, thus explaining why kids are always there.  Up to a 1/3rd of students in each class was hit by the bug.  I sometimes give high 5s to students...to this day I still can't.
« Last Edit: October 22, 2011, 08:33:17 am by WorkingTitle3484 »
You get what you give :)


Re: Pink Eye
« Reply #8 on: October 22, 2011, 11:56:42 am »
Pink eye is rolling through my school right now. I wouldn't be shocked if half my school had it by next week. They touch and share things like no other. On Friday, there was, at least, two girls with pink eye per class. I had LASEK done not too long ago, I dread the idea of getting pink eye.


  • stephw
  • Explorer

    • 9

    • August 29, 2011, 09:38:28 am
    • Seoul
Re: Pink Eye
« Reply #9 on: October 23, 2011, 04:48:10 pm »
Actually, it's not even with pinkeye. I'm kind of noticing the reason colds spread around so quickly is because everybody is constantly trapped in the same space, and they come in even if they're sick. The minute you get better, you've given the cold to someone else and it's eventually going to get passed back to you. I know it's the Korean way to come in even when you're sick, but I was miserable with a cold for the past week and I wish I could have just taken a day off, recovered, and come back, as opposed to spending the week getting progressively sicker and most likely passing it onto everybody I came in contact with. Oh well, I guess I had a long weekend to rest, so I shouldn't complain.


Re: Pink Eye
« Reply #10 on: October 23, 2011, 07:10:46 pm »
I'd never heard this expression "pink eye" until I looked on Google. In the UK we'd just call it conjunctivitis. Is "pink eye" Konglish, or a term actually used in English-speaking countries? Just curious.  :)


  • Frozencat99
  • The Legend

    • 2095

    • October 09, 2011, 04:31:36 pm
    more
Re: Pink Eye
« Reply #11 on: October 23, 2011, 07:21:51 pm »
I'd never heard this expression "pink eye" until I looked on Google. In the UK we'd just call it conjunctivitis. Is "pink eye" Konglish, or a term actually used in English-speaking countries? Just curious.  :)

Its an actual term, sadly. As you can see it comes with problems -- namely, anything that bothers your eyes can cause them to be pink.

I still do the high fives and then wash my hands between classes.
Beware the Homosexual Industrial Complex -- http://www.thedailyshow.com/watch/mon-june-17-2013/left-behind

You can leave your heterophobia behind.


  • odie
  • Veteran

    • 99

    • December 20, 2010, 09:15:10 am
    • Seoul
Re: Pink Eye
« Reply #12 on: October 24, 2011, 08:17:44 am »
A student told me that the "lazier" students will share the pink eye (wiping the infected person's eye and then wiping the non-infected person's eye) to get out of late night hagwon or some school work--or even just to have an excuse to sleep in class.

I've seen them lifting their patches and wiping their eyes and touching their desks so I lysol that desk down and keep my hands washed.
Seoul.AngloINFO.com

He is no fool who gives up what he cannot keep, to gain what he cannot lose.


  • teachermc
  • Super Waygook

    • 384

    • March 04, 2010, 11:47:41 am
    • Tongyeong, South Korea
    more
Re: Pink Eye
« Reply #13 on: October 24, 2011, 08:40:28 am »
I know that kids everywhere do not practice the best hygiene, but I really remember having a variety of adults on my case if I was sick, informing me (or reminding me) of all of the things I should and should not do to get better and to help keep from passing my sickness to others.  Being here has turned me mysophobic, having rarely witnessed students (and adults) make any attempt at washing or sanitizing their hands (or anything for that matter). 

It is not for lack of cartoon stickers - during the H1N1 panic cartoonists were called in to cutify public health as best as possible - but nothing was done to put soap in bathrooms or to discontinue the communal soap bar idea. 

I saw a whole hogwan troupe recently rubbing their red, swollen eyes while beginning to play on the same play set my children have been playing on...makes me thankful we have health care, I guess.


  • Korea2011
  • Waygookin

    • 21

    • October 14, 2011, 02:39:48 pm
    • South Korea
Re: Pink Eye
« Reply #14 on: October 24, 2011, 09:00:26 am »
Hello, I came across the same problem last year. Children would come to school with pink eye and not seem to care. This was extremely frustrating because I ended up getting pink eye! So be extremely care, maybe you should buy some cream just in case!!!


  • hildydoo
  • Veteran

    • 135

    • April 04, 2011, 01:41:10 pm
    • Seoul, South Korea
Re: Pink Eye
« Reply #15 on: October 24, 2011, 11:32:30 am »
I actually GOT pinkeye last semester, and they didn't understand why I didn't want to come to school! I had the eye drops, but I stayed home for at least 2 days because I didn't want to give it to my kids! They were just like "oh..."


Re: Pink Eye
« Reply #16 on: October 27, 2011, 11:42:57 am »
I appear to have come down with a case of pink-eye (conunctivitis). Yesterday I noticed my left eye was getting red and puffy. When I woke up this morning it was no better, and had also crusted over with eye-boggery slime.

Today I went to the eye doctor, who just gave me two kinds of eye drops and told me to come back in two days. So, it's out there. Wash your hands, people.

By the way, the term "pink-eye" is a real thing in American English, but it sounds so colloquial and out-dated, like someting out of old-timey medicine: "Goodness gracious! Pa has got the dropsy, aunt Bessie's come down with the consumption, and all the kids done got  pink eye."