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  • Yu_Bumsuk
  • The Legend

    • 2341

    • March 03, 2011, 02:10:36 pm
    • Hicksville, ROK
Re: English level of Korean teachers in Seoul schools
« Reply #20 on: October 13, 2011, 03:14:29 pm »
I don't work in Seoul (I know, sorry) but maybe I can provide some insight here. I teach at a teacher's university and help students prepare for their teacher's certification exam. Each province or  large city has it's own exam and teachers must take the exam where they plan to teach. The amount of new jobs is set each year, this year in Seoul it's around 600. So...the top 600 scorers are the ones who will get jobs. The teacher's exam is taken in 3 parts, one of them being an English interview and lesson. Naturally, the pool is much more competitive in Seoul than it is everywhere else, so it's safe to assume the top 600 teachers hired in Seoul (a fraction of all those who sit the test) have impeccable English abilities/scores. Teachers in rural provinces are much more likely to have low scores because there is less competition.

Hope that helped  ;D

So...are you saying that ALL teachers in Korea, as a part of their teachers certification, have to pass an exam in which they demonstrate something like proficiency in English?   This news is shocking to me--because, as I mentioned earlier--NO ONE in my Seoul school can utter a single correct/complete sentence in English.  I'm not exaggerating. 

Your post makes it sound really competitive---leading one to believe that any K teacher in Seoul should really be at the top of their game.  And I'm sure that's the case in most circumstances.  I don't know what happened at my school, though.

No, she's saying that younger, tenured teachers at "public-public" schools do.


  • Davox
  • Super Waygook

    • 497

    • February 05, 2011, 03:01:13 pm
    • Ilsan
Re: English level of Korean teachers in Seoul schools
« Reply #21 on: October 13, 2011, 03:47:49 pm »
I don't work in Seoul (I know, sorry) but maybe I can provide some insight here. I teach at a teacher's university and help students prepare for their teacher's certification exam. Each province or  large city has it's own exam and teachers must take the exam where they plan to teach. The amount of new jobs is set each year, this year in Seoul it's around 600. So...the top 600 scorers are the ones who will get jobs. The teacher's exam is taken in 3 parts, one of them being an English interview and lesson. Naturally, the pool is much more competitive in Seoul than it is everywhere else, so it's safe to assume the top 600 teachers hired in Seoul (a fraction of all those who sit the test) have impeccable English abilities/scores. Teachers in rural provinces are much more likely to have low scores because there is less competition.

Hope that helped  ;D

So...are you saying that ALL teachers in Korea, as a part of their teachers certification, have to pass an exam in which they demonstrate something like proficiency in English?   This news is shocking to me--because, as I mentioned earlier--NO ONE in my Seoul school can utter a single correct/complete sentence in English.  I'm not exaggerating. 

Your post makes it sound really competitive---leading one to believe that any K teacher in Seoul should really be at the top of their game.  And I'm sure that's the case in most circumstances.  I don't know what happened at my school, though.

My understanding, based on conversations with teachers:  It is really competitive, and you DO have to be at the top of your game to pass,  but English is just a small part of a much larger and meaner test.  And the English interview portion of the test would be administered by other (older) Koreans who may or may not be fluent themselves.

And also, the English portion of the test would be much newer than the other portions, probably only the youngest teachers (if any) at your school would have had to do it.


  • Yu_Bumsuk
  • The Legend

    • 2341

    • March 03, 2011, 02:10:36 pm
    • Hicksville, ROK
Re: English level of Korean teachers in Seoul schools
« Reply #22 on: October 13, 2011, 03:50:08 pm »
My understanding, based on conversations with teachers:  It is really competitive, and you DO have to be at the top of your game to pass,  but English is just a small part of a much larger and meaner test.  And the English interview portion of the test would be administered by other (older) Koreans who may or may not be fluent themselves.

And also, the English portion of the test would be much newer than the other portions, probably only the youngest teachers (if any) at your school would have had to do it.

Again, if they're not a contract teacher, which most younger teachers are in some districts.