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  • ltisdale
  • Explorer

    • 5

    • October 05, 2011, 10:28:57 am
    • Hongseong, Chungcheongnam-do, South Korea
Hitting and general violence
« on: October 05, 2011, 11:40:19 am »
I'm having a real issue with the students hitting each other in class. The teachers don't seem to care until someone is in the fetal position crying and it's really disruptive to my class. I understand that I am in a different culture then what i'm use to, but how can I enforce to them that hitting just isn't okay without stepping on any cultural toes?


  • kyndo
  • Moderator LVL 1

    • 5262

    • March 03, 2011, 09:45:24 am
    • Gyeongsangbuk-do
Re: Hitting and general violence
« Reply #1 on: October 05, 2011, 11:53:03 am »
Preventing students from hitting each other during class will not step on anybodies' cultural toes. :)
I teach with many different co-teachers at a middle-school, and none of them think that that sort of behaviour is acceptable -- I'm thinking that your teacher may just be a little passive.

I would do 2 things.
First I would speak to your coteachers how it distracts you and the students and prevents them from learning and from having fun in your class. Make sure that the teachers understand that it is a problem for you, and that you want it to stop even if s/he doesn't worry too much about it
 Second, have a quick 10 minute rehearsal of your classroom rules at the beginning of each of your classes, with special emphasis on the no-hitting rule. Bring up the topic of punishments and come to an agreement about what the appropriate punishment should be (when my co-teachers aren't around to play disciplinarian, I give 1 warning, then have them stand in opposite corners at the back of the class for 5 - 10 minutes).

Goodluck!

PS: Its a little ironic that the coteachers punish the students when they hit each other ... by smacking the student.  ::)
« Last Edit: October 05, 2011, 04:42:19 pm by kyndo »


Re: Hitting and general violence
« Reply #2 on: October 05, 2011, 12:05:27 pm »
쌍사실!
ya'll waygookers are off the hook man, all ya ya'll


  • hayley00
  • Explorer

    • 5

    • September 30, 2011, 02:41:52 pm
    • daegu
Re: Hitting and general violence
« Reply #3 on: October 05, 2011, 01:16:44 pm »
Tell your co teacher and see if you can move the main culprits, put them in separate seats at the front of the class. Or you could give them some extra homework as a punishment. Try going over the rules again and set reward charts - the kids need something to work for and you need to tell them what you expect of them first. Make sure you follow through with punishments as they will respect you more. My coteachers are really lapse with rules and it drives me crazy! Good luck! I know how you feel.


  • Cereal
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1239

    • March 16, 2011, 12:51:55 pm
    • Earth
    more
Re: Hitting and general violence
« Reply #4 on: October 05, 2011, 01:42:05 pm »
Wow, I have never seen anything like this in any of my classes. I would think that your co-teachers will have to be solidly on board with you to make any sort of punishment thing work out. Ask about a meeting with all of you together and see if it would be helpful to bring in the VP and perhaps the parents of the main culprits.

I've witnessed a fair bit of violence in public, however, even in this one horse town.
"The urge to destroy is also a creative urge."
Bakunin


  • Yu_Bumsuk
  • The Legend

    • 2341

    • March 03, 2011, 02:10:36 pm
    • Hicksville, ROK
Re: Hitting and general violence
« Reply #5 on: October 05, 2011, 03:33:43 pm »
As long as it's not disrupting my lesson too much and no special needs students are involved I really couldn't care less. In fact I laugh at the American and Canadian teachers at my district's English Village who try to stop my MS students from doing it while they're there. Trying to stop it is basically like trying to change someone's body language.


  • flasyb
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1901

    • November 30, 2010, 12:10:03 pm
    • South Korea
Re: Hitting and general violence
« Reply #6 on: October 05, 2011, 03:52:51 pm »
As long as it's not disrupting my lesson too much and no special needs students are involved I really couldn't care less. In fact I laugh at the American and Canadian teachers at my district's English Village who try to stop my MS students from doing it while they're there. Trying to stop it is basically like trying to change someone's body language.

I agree. If I want them to stop, I just start adding minutes to the "class finish time" that I write up on the board. I also remove time for good behaviour without taking the time below 50 minutes. It generally works to get them quiet and reduce the fighting. I did take what looked to be some kind of skipping rope from a pair of boys who were having fun wrapping it around each other's necks and pulling it tight today. Turns out it was a short length of bungee with plastic handles on either end. I still have no idea what its real function is though.
In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act.

We are not "guests" in Korea. Korea didn't invite us over for Pimms in the garden. We are paid employees.


  • Yu_Bumsuk
  • The Legend

    • 2341

    • March 03, 2011, 02:10:36 pm
    • Hicksville, ROK
Re: Hitting and general violence
« Reply #7 on: October 05, 2011, 04:14:45 pm »
As long as it's not disrupting my lesson too much and no special needs students are involved I really couldn't care less. In fact I laugh at the American and Canadian teachers at my district's English Village who try to stop my MS students from doing it while they're there. Trying to stop it is basically like trying to change someone's body language.

I agree. If I want them to stop, I just start adding minutes to the "class finish time" that I write up on the board. I also remove time for good behaviour without taking the time below 50 minutes. It generally works to get them quiet and reduce the fighting. I did take what looked to be some kind of skipping rope from a pair of boys who were having fun wrapping it around each other's necks and pulling it tight today. Turns out it was a short length of bungee with plastic handles on either end. I still have no idea what its real function is though.

It's proably a workout tool for skinny teenagers who can't lift 20lbs on a lat-pull or pec. machine. Yeah, I might step in if there was a danger of strangulation or pushing around open windows when they're sitting on the window ledge. If they want to sit there and whack each other as hard as 90-pound 13-year-olds can they can go ahead and do that all day if I'm not in the middle of teaching something.


  • flasyb
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1901

    • November 30, 2010, 12:10:03 pm
    • South Korea
Re: Hitting and general violence
« Reply #8 on: October 05, 2011, 04:18:26 pm »
^^
I feel the same and so do most of the teachers in my school by the looks of things. Let them get on but protect the most vulnerable and if things get too far out of hand then stop the class and do whatever it is you do to discipline the kids.
In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act.

We are not "guests" in Korea. Korea didn't invite us over for Pimms in the garden. We are paid employees.


  • Janitor
  • Moderator - LVL 2

    • 956

    • June 14, 2010, 02:01:32 pm
    • Ulsan
Re: Hitting and general violence
« Reply #9 on: October 07, 2011, 03:08:18 pm »
I have recently outlawed in my classes as it just lead to generally lead to increased idiocy in my classes. So I just started making fun of it. I told the students that I did not like the "love taps" and that they should stop. Most of the classes get a laugh because they just hear the word "love" and look at the two doing it and burst out laughing. Slowly they learn to stop.

My co-teacher also explained that it just isn't good to always be hitting people. Some kids get it and other don't but that is as far as I take it.


  • Yu_Bumsuk
  • The Legend

    • 2341

    • March 03, 2011, 02:10:36 pm
    • Hicksville, ROK
Re: Hitting and general violence
« Reply #10 on: October 11, 2011, 11:16:44 am »
I just passed a bunch of my third-year HS students play wrestling - a bunch of 18-year-olds in skirts rolling around on the floor. Does that happen in many other countries?


Re: Hitting and general violence
« Reply #11 on: October 11, 2011, 11:51:13 am »
Kids run manic here at lunch and breaktimes, in the classrooms and corridors.


  • KingKrang
  • Adventurer

    • 49

    • December 08, 2010, 10:51:51 am
    • Outside Korea
Re: Hitting and general violence
« Reply #12 on: October 11, 2011, 01:06:29 pm »
I just passed a bunch of my third-year HS students play wrestling - a bunch of 18-year-olds in skirts rolling around on the floor. Does that happen in many other countries?

Yes, but you have to pay for it


Re: Hitting and general violence
« Reply #13 on: October 11, 2011, 01:10:58 pm »
I teach kindergarten and the majority of our students are violent towards each other. This happens in all classes I think but I find it very hard to just ignore it in my class. The children don't seem to understand why I ask them to stop hitting/fighting/pushing at all though so it's pretty ineffectual. However, if a student gets hurt, I feel like the Korean teachers hold me responsible. Even though they don't do anything to stop violence in their own classes, it seems like all eyes are on me to find out what happened and why a child is crying if it happens in my class. Has anyone had any success with reducing the violence among this age group (Korean age 3-5)? It really upsets me!


Re: Hitting and general violence
« Reply #14 on: October 18, 2011, 10:05:51 am »
PS: Its a little ironic that the coteachers punish the students when they hit each other ... by smacking the student.  ::)

I know! I am shocked that teachers hit students. Is this even legal? I heard that it's illegal in Seoul, but not everywhere.