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  • manyfives
  • Newgookin

    • 2

    • September 03, 2011, 08:44:16 am
    • Daejeon
Eating Paleo for 15k a day in Korea?
« on: September 04, 2011, 01:06:14 am »
 :D I would like to know if it is possible to eat a mainly paleo diet for less than 15,000 won a day shopping in supermarkets, or even eating out in S.Korea?



  • jkang
  • Veteran

    • 96

    • October 21, 2010, 02:25:12 pm
    • Seoul, South Korea
Re: Eating Paleo for 15k a day in Korea?
« Reply #1 on: September 04, 2011, 09:42:35 am »
I'm not really familiar with Paleo but seems like its a lot of meat and vegetables and no grains... Ingredients in general are expensive in Korea. especially meats and vegetables... Not eating grains will make it even more difficult because that is what koreans eat in every meal. though you might be able to make it on 15k a day for some time.. you'll find that 15k is very limiting...

If there is one advice i could give in shopping at the supermarkets (Emart or Homeplus) is shop late at night. Like 10:30-11:00... This is when the marts will try to sell off any left over foods such as meats and fish that have short shelf-lifes. they'll discount 30-50% off products that would have been sold full price just a few hours before.


  • manyfives
  • Newgookin

    • 2

    • September 03, 2011, 08:44:16 am
    • Daejeon
Re: Eating Paleo for 15k a day in Korea?
« Reply #2 on: September 05, 2011, 12:14:36 am »
I'm not really familiar with Paleo but seems like its a lot of meat and vegetables and no grains... Ingredients in general are expensive in Korea. especially meats and vegetables... Not eating grains will make it even more difficult because that is what koreans eat in every meal. though you might be able to make it on 15k a day for some time.. you'll find that 15k is very limiting...

If there is one advice i could give in shopping at the supermarkets (Emart or Homeplus) is shop late at night. Like 10:30-11:00... This is when the marts will try to sell off any left over foods such as meats and fish that have short shelf-lifes. they'll discount 30-50% off products that would have been sold full price just a few hours before.

Thanks jkang for the advice on supermarkets. I will be @ my hagwon M-F until 9 in the evening so I  think shopping immediately after I have finished work would be the best time to shop!

My 15k is not strict, but just considering its fairly easy to do in the UK for 10 @ 3 meals a day I just wanted to know if it would translate across to Korea, since I've seen that for some reason fruit/veg is more expensive there than I thought it would be.

Paleo eating is basically just eat as much veg, fish and meats as you wish and avoid in general things that were introduced into our diets post agricultural age, such as grains, veg oils, refined sugars and HFCS

@ Rusty, thanks for the info about Broccoli, is it possible to get hold of a food steamer and a Juicer? With regard to 'the land of salad greens' is it common to be able to buy prepacke fresh greens in most stores? How much are they typically? For example, in the UK 300g spinach is 1.20 which is about 2,000 Won.
« Last Edit: September 05, 2011, 12:22:40 am by manyfives »


  • arthurp
  • Explorer

    • 5

    • September 05, 2011, 04:39:24 am
    • Incheon, South Korea
Re: Eating Paleo for 15k a day in Korea?
« Reply #3 on: September 05, 2011, 04:53:33 am »
Oo, keep me updated, because I have been trying to keep up with paleo and it is extremely hard. However, I am always invited by my friends and co-teachers to eat with, and there seems to be nothing on the menu that doesn't have a form of processed grain or sauce. Also, I am forced to have school lunches...so that goes that down the drain. I get hungry by lunch, and I am new so I have no money to buy lunch. But I give you a lot of credit if you can for 15,000W a month. I might just go 50% paleo and do it for breakfast and some dinners.


  • shmoogrin
  • Veteran

    • 100

    • December 01, 2010, 03:08:32 pm
    • Jinju, South Korea
Re: Eating Paleo for 15k a day in Korea?
« Reply #4 on: September 05, 2011, 08:32:44 am »
Buy your veggies at the outdoor markets - much cheaper than emart and such and you can give the ajummas a laugh that the foreigner comes to shop at the market.


Re: Eating Paleo for 15k a day in Korea?
« Reply #5 on: November 24, 2011, 09:22:25 am »
I've been wondering about this a lot too. It's been really hard for me to break away from grains here, since they seem to be in everything, but I really want to try out this Paleo thing. I've been reading up on it and it sounds really good to me.


  • Jrong
  • The Legend

    • 2381

    • April 28, 2011, 12:52:32 pm
    more
Re: Eating Paleo for 15k a day in Korea?
« Reply #6 on: November 24, 2011, 09:31:15 am »
Hey! It's is awesome to hear someone doing paleo! I'm not a strict "paleo" person but I discovered about a year ago that my body metabolises fat much better than carbs.

15k a day? Depends on your caloric intake needs. How tall are you? How much do you weigh? Are you trying to keep muscle or gain muscle? Do you have a naturally high metabolism? How much do you exercise?
"When in doubt...ask Troglodyte" ~0mnslnd


  • Seoulian
  • Veteran

    • 190

    • September 13, 2010, 08:09:40 am
    • Seoul
Re: Eating Paleo for 15k a day in Korea?
« Reply #7 on: November 24, 2011, 09:37:30 am »
 I went on a low carb diet in the summer. I had great results with body fat and muscle composition. The way to keep it cheap it to eat lots of eggs and chicken. You will get really hungry at first as your body adjusts. I recommend drinking coffee (stimulant, appetite suppressor) and making a dozen boiled eggs at the start of the week to snack on. Eggs + mayo + chopped spinach + salt and pepper can be pretty good.


  • 21 grams
  • Waygookin

    • 17

    • June 24, 2011, 11:24:29 am
    • Ilsan, South Korea
Re: Eating Paleo for 15k a day in Korea?
« Reply #8 on: November 24, 2011, 05:20:55 pm »
To be clear, this diet isn't as dangerous as some of the other fad diets out there, but it is a fad diet nevertheless.  That is to say, approach with caution.  While there are certainly a few dietary "rules" that should be followed by everyone, such as staying away from processed foods and sugars, everybody's dietary needs are different depending on a number of factors.

Some food for thought:
http://www.npr.org/blogs/13.7/2011/10/27/141666659/the-paleo-diet-not-the-way-to-a-healthy-future


  • 21 grams
  • Waygookin

    • 17

    • June 24, 2011, 11:24:29 am
    • Ilsan, South Korea
Re: Eating Paleo for 15k a day in Korea?
« Reply #9 on: November 25, 2011, 12:58:20 am »
"That is, we should eat lean meat and vegetables because our Paleolithic hunting-and-gathering ancestors did."

Well that's wrong for a start. "lean" meat has nothing to do with it. The more fat the better.

I think leading Paleo advocates would disagree with you on that point.  Most notably, Dr. Loren Cordain stresses lean options like ostrich, bison, and organ meats.


"Largely, but not 100 percent, a vegetarian, I don't tell others what to eat. But the paleo-movement seems to doom (even if unintentionally) more animals to life and death in factory farms."
 
That says it all.

On factory farming; people who have done the research recommend eating pasture fed animals where possible.
http://www.archevore.com/get-started/

I don't think Dr. King would argue against the superiority of grass-fed, free range livestock.  The matter is the feasibility of feeding 7 billion with such an anachronistic method of husbandry.  That's not to say, it couldn't be done; it just isn't the direction our factory-fed society is
headed.

That guy either did zero research or misrepresented what he did find. Although, I do agree with his conclusions, he offered no alternative.

It's a blog post, dude, not a journal submission.  She's conveyed mostly anecdotal characterizations of paleo diet followers, and she does a decent job of avoiding the broad brush.  As one might suspect, her qualms with the diet are probably more grounded in her vegetarian/environmentalist philosophy than a purely scholarly, scientifically informed mindset, but I think she raises some valid points, nevertheless.  I would've liked to see some sort of alternative proffered, as well, but for what it was, I can't be as critical.