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  • glb0b
  • Expert Waygook

    • 601

    • July 06, 2010, 03:02:56 pm
Re: NZ tax Q & A
« Reply #20 on: January 08, 2012, 10:15:27 am »
Is it at all possible to be refunded for tax money if you have been working at a hagwon?

I don't believe so. I think that the tax excemption only applies to public schools. Hagwon teachers have to pay tax.

I have been receiving conflicting information regarding Nz'ers and the pension.
I have been on the NZ Immigration site that says NZ does not have an reciprocal arrangement with Korea hence I am not eligible to be refunded the contributions I am making into the pension fund, at the end of my contract.
A friend of my husband (a New Zealander) has been living in Korea, on and off, for the last 8 years. He has been home a couple of times and says he has not been refunded his pension.
My questions are - is it true that I will not receive my pension refund at the end of my year?
If I do not, do I have to keep making payments into something that I will not get back?
Many thanks

Sadly, you have to pay and you will not get the money back.


UK, Australia and NZ are some of the countries which do not receive pension money back.
You still have to pay it.  If you turn 65 years old and you're still here then you'll get it back.

Australia recently made an agreement so now Australians can get the money back. Lucky them!


Re: NZ tax Q & A
« Reply #21 on: January 09, 2012, 04:43:33 pm »
Australia recently made an agreement so now Australians can get the money back. Lucky them!

My mum is Australian so I'm looking into getting an Aus passport. Can anyone see any potential glitches with this?

There are only pro's to being Australian.  You may have to learn how to say "fush and chups" properly.


  • Rhodesian
  • Adventurer

    • 33

    • February 19, 2012, 09:06:34 am
    • New Zealand
Re: NZ tax Q & A
« Reply #22 on: February 21, 2012, 03:06:05 pm »
Here's another question

If you are a UK citizen and a NZ permanent resident, can I get my tax back and do I have to write to the NZ IRD for that non-resident headed paper letter that was mentioned?


  • lotte world
  • The Legend

    • 2272

    • August 22, 2011, 09:00:38 pm
    more
Re: NZ tax Q & A
« Reply #23 on: February 21, 2012, 05:35:36 pm »
Here's another question

If you are a UK citizen and a NZ permanent resident, can I get my tax back and do I have to write to the NZ IRD for that non-resident headed paper letter that was mentioned?

Are you at a public school?  If so, you should qualify for tax-free status for the first two years as a UK citizen (this is stated in your contract).

You must have applied as a UK citizen, so you need to get your residency certificate (or equivalent) from the UK.



Re: NZ tax Q & A
« Reply #24 on: March 02, 2012, 01:21:13 pm »
I read on a blog that if you were an NZ resident you would not eligable to redeem the Korean pension upon leaving. I was wondering if this is true? I checked a couple sites, but thought it might be best to ask.

Thanks


Re: NZ tax Q & A
« Reply #25 on: March 05, 2012, 10:34:47 am »
Thanks for all of the info!

Do I need to fill in this attached form with my letter from IRD?

Thanks,
Karina


  • bawaugh
  • Super Waygook

    • 497

    • March 04, 2012, 08:49:30 pm
    • Geoje
    more
Re: NZ tax Q & A
« Reply #26 on: March 07, 2012, 01:07:02 pm »
Being a New Zealand Citizen does not get you the exemption.

When I rang the IRD I was told that I needed to be a New Zealand tax resident in order to obtain this exemption. The exemption was not able to be given to me, despite the fact I am a New Zealand Citizen, because it depended on being a New Zealand tax resident before I started living in Korea. Because I had spent the previous 4 years in Ireland I was not a tax resident and thus could not get this exemption.
PV=nRT

Where
P is pressure
V is volume
n is number of moles
R is the gas constant
T is the temperature


Re: NZ tax Q & A
« Reply #27 on: March 07, 2012, 01:10:47 pm »
Being a New Zealand Citizen does not get you the exemption.

When I rang the IRD I was told that I needed to be a New Zealand tax resident in order to obtain this exemption. The exemption was not able to be given to me, despite the fact I am a New Zealand Citizen, because it depended on being a New Zealand tax resident before I started living in Korea. Because I had spent the previous 4 years in Ireland I was not a tax resident and thus could not get this exemption.

Are you talking about pension refunds or tax exemption?  ???


  • bawaugh
  • Super Waygook

    • 497

    • March 04, 2012, 08:49:30 pm
    • Geoje
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Re: NZ tax Q & A
« Reply #28 on: March 09, 2012, 09:53:51 am »
I was referring to the Tax exemption.

For the Record the section of theNew Zealand/Korea double tax agreement which gives this benefit says

Article 21
Professors and teachers
1. A professor or teacher who is or was a resident of a Contracting State immediately before making a visit to the other Contracting State, and who, at the invitation of any university, college, school or other similar educational institution, which is recognised by the competent authority in that other Contracting State, visits that other Contracting State for a period not exceeding two years solely for the purpose of teaching or research or both at such educational institution shall be exempt from tax in that other Contracting State on any remuneration for such teaching or research.

2. The provisions of paragraph 1 shall not apply to income from personal services for research if such research is undertaken primarily for the private benefit of a specific person or persons
PV=nRT

Where
P is pressure
V is volume
n is number of moles
R is the gas constant
T is the temperature


  • blairfitz
  • Explorer

    • 7

    • March 19, 2012, 12:10:08 pm
    • Naju, Korea
Re: NZ tax Q & A
« Reply #29 on: March 31, 2012, 07:14:49 pm »
Yes it is a terrible system for us kiwis for sure but it is compulsory for us to pay pension and we do not get is back but sometimes the institute will be slightly dodgy and not pay it or they may use a private pension scheme that is possible to get the pension back. If you are lucky you will get it back but do not hold your breath.


Re: NZ tax Q & A
« Reply #30 on: April 06, 2012, 09:33:24 pm »
Kiwis have to pay pension...but we dont get it back!


Re: NZ tax Q & A
« Reply #31 on: June 23, 2012, 04:59:53 pm »
I have a question on tax for NZers if you leave from Australia.

I moved to Australia when I was 16 and never had a job in NZ. I probably have an IRD number lying around somewhere but I've never applied for a tax claim while I was in NZ. Since I have been living in Australia I have a job and a TFN number and have claimed for tax. I don't have any bank accounts in NZ or any property to claim tax on.

Do I have to claim on my IRD number or can I just use my TFN?

I am not in Korea yet, but plan to so I would just like to know in advance.

Thanks


  • bawaugh
  • Super Waygook

    • 497

    • March 04, 2012, 08:49:30 pm
    • Geoje
    more
Re: NZ tax Q & A
« Reply #32 on: July 09, 2012, 08:15:47 pm »
I have a question on tax for NZers if you leave from Australia.

I moved to Australia when I was 16 and never had a job in NZ. I probably have an IRD number lying around somewhere but I've never applied for a tax claim while I was in NZ. Since I have been living in Australia I have a job and a TFN number and have claimed for tax. I don't have any bank accounts in NZ or any property to claim tax on.

Do I have to claim on my IRD number or can I just use my TFN?

I am not in Korea yet, but plan to so I would just like to know in advance.

Thanks

I understand that Australians work tax free in Schools here for two years, check the Australia Korea double tax agreement. It will depend on what the fine print says on if you can work tax free for two years. I could not take advantage of the two years of tax free earnings for NZers because I was living in Ireland before I came to Korea and thus was not a tax resident of NZ immediately before I came to Korea.

 In this case it will depend on what the Australian Korea tax agreement will say and thus this will decide if you are liable for Korean tax or not. I don't think your nationality matters in this case.   

As for your tax liability in NZ, I doubt you have any, once your are out of NZ for 325 days and have no enduring relationship with NZ you are not liable for any tax on overseas income. I don't think they count bank accounts in NZ. I don't think you owe NZ any tax on your Korean income. To get NZ tax residence I understand you have to spend 185 says in the country in 12 months.

I suggest giving the IRD in NZ a call as they are better placed to give you advice on this issue. At the end of the day I could easliy be wrong, I am not a tax lawyer. The IRD was very nice and helpful when I rang them. I did not have to give them my IRD number.

For the record in NZ there are no tax returns if you are earning PAYE income - unless you want to file one or think you have overpaid. 

http://taxpolicy.ird.govt.nz/tax-treaties/korea
http://taxpolicy.ird.govt.nz/contacting-us

In any case Korean taxes are very low. However I don't know about Australian tax liability - ring the ATO they should know.

In summary - your NZ passport is of no use to you, for the NZ Korea Tax exemption because you are not a tax resident of NZ just before going to Korea. It will depend on the Korea Australia double tax agreement if you get the tax break. And ring the Tax authorities as they will be better placed to tell you if you will get any tax break or not.

Of course please be aware I am not a tax lawyer or expert and thus use what I have said at your own risk. Don't blame me if you end up with a surprise tax bill.

NZ Korea double tax treaty. (for the record)

Article 21
Professors and teachers
1. A professor or teacher who is or was a resident of a Contracting State immediately before making a visit to the other Contracting State, and who, at the invitation of any university, college, school or other similar educational institution, which is recognised by the competent authority in that other Contracting State, visits that other Contracting State for a period not exceeding two years solely for the purpose of teaching or research or both at such educational institution shall be exempt from tax in that other Contracting State on any remuneration for such teaching or research.

2. The provisions of paragraph 1 shall not apply to income from personal services for research if such research is undertaken primarily for the private benefit of a specific person or persons
« Last Edit: July 09, 2012, 08:21:38 pm by bawaugh »
PV=nRT

Where
P is pressure
V is volume
n is number of moles
R is the gas constant
T is the temperature