Read 2337 times

  • LPchica086
  • Waygookin

    • 22

    • November 13, 2011, 10:49:49 am
    • United States
First Interview!
« on: November 26, 2011, 11:29:46 am »
sidenote: Not sure which board this fits best under..

But...I got my first interview!  It's with a hagwon in Ilsan...I'm kinda nervous, but I'm trying my best to look online as for what to expect.  This first interview is just a phone interview and I'm told it's probably going to be similar to what I had with my recruiter for the first time. 
Any general advice or thoughts on what kind of questions to expect?  Anything that I should definitely remember to ask them?   :o 8)

Also, I haven't been told by my recruiter yet what the name of the school is yet...should I know this going into the interview?  I feel like I should (sort of like with a regular interview in that you'd want to know as much as possible about them)...but as it's my first ESL interview...I'm not quite sure what to expect.

YAY!!  It's all coming together :)

Thanks!
***
"It is impossible to live without failing at something, unless you live so cautiously that you might as well not have lived at all - in which case, you fail by default."
--JK Rowling
--
"Go confidently in the direction of your dreams. Live the life you have imagined."
Henry David Thoreau


  • LPchica086
  • Waygookin

    • 22

    • November 13, 2011, 10:49:49 am
    • United States
Re: First Interview!
« Reply #1 on: November 26, 2011, 11:33:20 am »
I also have all my paperwork completed except for that stupid background check which apparently takes up to 12 weeks  :(  ...and getting an apostille for that..
I think after this (assuming I like them and they like me) all I would have left would be an in-person interview and to get my contract ready.   :o
***
"It is impossible to live without failing at something, unless you live so cautiously that you might as well not have lived at all - in which case, you fail by default."
--JK Rowling
--
"Go confidently in the direction of your dreams. Live the life you have imagined."
Henry David Thoreau


  • JahRhythm
  • Fanatical Supporter!

    • 1122

    • May 25, 2011, 12:49:41 pm
    • Seoul
    more
Re: First Interview!
« Reply #2 on: November 26, 2011, 12:31:06 pm »
Having an interview for a job when you don't know who they are is a joke.
No need to be nervous. Hagwon hiring standards are extremely low.
Basically can you speak clearly and have a coherent conversation?
Not to burst your bubble, I sense your excitement and that's cool, but the industry you're entering is a joke.
P.S. You will be teaching EFL not ESL.
We teach EFL not ESL. Hagwon and "Private School" are not synonymous. Not everyone works in either a hagwon or public school. Immigration Question? Call 1345.


Re: First Interview!
« Reply #3 on: November 26, 2011, 12:37:09 pm »
Having an interview for a job when you don't know who they are is a joke.
No need to be nervous. Hagwon hiring standards are extremely low.
Basically can you speak clearly and have a coherent conversation?
Not to burst your bubble, I sense your excitement and that's cool, but the industry you're entering is a joke.
P.S. You will be teaching EFL not ESL.

She doesnt know the name of her school and still doesnt have a cbc. So this school is almost guaranteed to be a bottom rung hagwon itching to hire a newbie that doesnt know about flight reimbursements, nhic, pension, overtime, weekend work, red flag clauses such as denying a LOR, teaching hours vs actual teaching hours, pay dates, et al. 1.9 mil tops.

I am curious if she has that same giddy attitude when she ends up in the contract forum asking how to pull a runner though.


Re: First Interview!
« Reply #4 on: November 26, 2011, 02:00:18 pm »
Express your love for teaching and children and you will do fine...

But please find out the name of the school and google it. Make sure it isn't blacklisted.
The teaching hours.... The teaching hours... The Teaching hours!!
The amount of vacation (honestly 10 days is not enough when you've got a heavy workload everyday)



  • jdw501
  • Waygookin

    • 20

    • November 02, 2011, 11:14:48 am
    • Cheonan, South Korea
Re: First Interview!
« Reply #5 on: November 27, 2011, 10:25:07 am »
In response to the questions LPchica086 actually asked rather than any of my own condescending analysis of her situation given by some of the previous contributors, I'd suggest the following:

It will clearly depend on who's asking the questions. If it's a Korean interviewing you, unless they have a very high level of English, they're primarily going to be interested in what your voice sounds like. I've spoken to a friend responsible for recruiting at an education office about this previously, and she told me that when her Korean boss interviews potential candidates, that is all that they're after. When I was interviewed, I was asked very simple questions about my experience, what I thought about teaching in Korea, why I wanted to come and how I would cope in an environment which was very different to where I was from. Don't be surprised if you get asked questions, which, in your home country you'd consider personally intrusive, such as - do you exercise often? do you drink? etc. They just want to find out information about your lifestyle.

Like I said previously, though, this type of interview is primarily about the sound of your voice and whether you have a clear accent. My best advice would be to focus on clear and concise answers. Don't ramble on for ages and try to keep the language you use at a simple, but not condescending level.

If it's a native English speaker who's going to interview you (and I'm guessing it could be if you are applying to a hagwon - some of which are owned by foreigners) you might well get some questions that really do look more at the content of what you say i.e. teaching philosophy etc. But I don't have experience of this in Korea, so will leave it to others to comment.

As to what you should ask, this could be anything depending on what you're concerned about. As you don't seem to know much about the job your applying for, it's clearly reasonable to try and find out the basic information you need e.g. location, links to public transport, accomodation, work schedule, class size etc. Don't feel that you need to shy away from asking questions. Sound, and commonly given, advice would be to ask to your recruiter/employer if you could speak to the native speaker you are replacing (that it is if there was one there previously). They can give you the low-down on what the job is actually like. Alarm bells should ring for you at any reluctance to pass on this information. You might also want to consider posting the contract that they offer you on here in order that some of the more experienced contributors can highlight any of the potential pitfalls with what you are signing up to do.

I hope this is useful. Other people commenting on your thread have given fairly negative impressions of what Korea can be like for new recruits. Sometimes they are correct in what they say. Many people do have bad experiences. Equally, I think they're vastly outwieghed by people who have a positive experience. Reading Waygook threads can sometimes give the impression that Korea is a hell-hole. However, it's more common than people write on here when they have something to bitch about rather than to express positive feelings about the place. So always bear that in mind.


  • plchron
  • Super Waygook

    • 262

    • July 20, 2011, 10:24:04 am
    • Ulsan
Re: First Interview!
« Reply #6 on: November 27, 2011, 03:44:19 pm »
OP; good luck with getting a job in korea. it is very very easy to do. As the above poster stated, make sure that your contract is above board and that you talk to former/ current teachers. DON'T rush into accepting an offer until everything looks legit in the contract you sign and if you get bad vibes then go with another school. there are thousands out here.


Re: First Interview!
« Reply #7 on: November 27, 2011, 04:48:58 pm »
Interviews are a dime a dozen.  Getting a job nowadays is a bit more difficult (it depends a lot on how young, pretty/handsome/blond/blue-eyed you are and, to a lesser degree, your education and experience).  Find out who this company is you're interviewing with.  Interview questions are rarely difficult.  Sometimes it's a Korean, sometimes it's a native English speaker (one of their teachers).  Find out who the company is and if they've been blacklisted.  Ask questions about pay, vacation etc, but don't believe much that you hear on the phone.  Get the e-mail address (and/or personal cell phone number) of at least one of their Native English Teachers (more if possible).  If they resist in giving you e-mail addresses, AVOID AT ALL COSTS.  E-mail the teacher later and ask the nitty-gritty about pay, severance, vacation, deductions, and general scrupulousness of the owner/director.

The interview questions should be the least of your worries.  You'll get questions about why you want to teach in Korea and other typical interview questions.

Ilsan is a fairly popular area to work (I lived there for 2 years and really liked the city).  It's young and affluent.  This all means a more fertile breeding ground for shady hagwon directors.  However, there are decent hagwons even in Ilsan.  If you have any questions, contact me via PM.
C is for cookie, that's good enough for me.