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Guitar - climate change - humidity
« on: June 16, 2011, 10:15:51 am »
hi everyone!

I got a guitar from yongsan IPark mall in Jan. Its a chinese epiphone.

Ive picked up a slight buzz on the 5th (3rd,2nd) string....

I have a feeling this is humidity and heat change, - i live next to a paddy field ... im also using real low guage strings too, - i noticed an improvement when i changed to a fresh set

any feedback , your thoughts , remedies.... ???

I dont think its the guitar per se because the frets are okay and its new,, i think (i bloomin hope) its the weather!!

thanks :-)


  • Vincent
  • Veteran

    • 119

    • March 02, 2011, 12:02:22 pm
    • korea
Re: Guitar - climate change - humidity
« Reply #1 on: June 16, 2011, 10:26:55 am »
check that the string is seated in the slight groove on the bridge and the same for the nut  - the strings can move out of place with some enthusiastic strumming sometimes :D


  • bhwung
  • Veteran

    • 101

    • April 01, 2011, 08:05:04 am
    • Busan
Re: Guitar - climate change - humidity
« Reply #2 on: June 16, 2011, 10:33:00 am »
Hi,
I was worried about this too when I picked up my acoustic back in April.  This is a website that I found doing a google search.
http://www.fretnotguitarrepair.com/repair/acoustic-guitar/buzzing.php

There seems to be many causes for a buzz.  The only one on the list that could be caused by humidity is the upper fret buzz, but I think you said yours was on the 5th.  It might be because the action on your guitar is too low or something is warped or worn down on your guitar. I would do a quick visual on your guitar because you probably will be able to spot it.

Hope it helps.


Re: Guitar - climate change - humidity
« Reply #3 on: June 16, 2011, 10:58:07 am »
Last winter, after using the humidifier, my acoustic guitar picked up a buzz on the second fret, 1st string. It sounded awful! It didn't fix itself, so I took it to Nagwon (music market near Insadong) to the store where I had bought the guitar. A guy fixed it for free in about 2 minutes. He used some metal tool and it looked like he sanded down the fret. 


Re: Guitar - climate change - humidity
« Reply #4 on: June 16, 2011, 11:26:54 am »
I would say it is the weather.   Had something kind of similar happen to one of my guitars.  Guy that fixed it told me something like, if you are not comfortable than your guitar isn't (weather wise).  Seemed like the advice made sense at the time. 


  • Aadi
  • Veteran

    • 78

    • September 10, 2010, 02:27:20 pm
    • Seoul
Re: Guitar - climate change - humidity
« Reply #5 on: June 16, 2011, 12:02:29 pm »
It's the weather.  Wood moves with humidity changes, guitar necks are no exception.  You can solve this with a tweak of the truss rod.  Also, low-gauge (light) strings vibrate in a larger ellipse than high-gauge (heavy) strings and therefore buzz more.  But again a tweak of the truss rod, probably a loosening, should solve the problem.  I imagine YouTube has at least 2,000 videos to walk you through the process.


  • hedonismbot
  • Explorer

    • 9

    • March 03, 2011, 07:43:05 am
    • Busan, South Korea
Re: Guitar - climate change - humidity
« Reply #6 on: June 16, 2011, 12:52:17 pm »
Careful not to max out the truss rod on your guitar. Some pretty sound advice thus far. My only suggestion is that you do not turn the truss rod too much in one day as the neck has to adjust to the changes and you can seriously damage it if you are not careful. Another thing that you may wish to consider is that it may not exclusively be the neck. You may wish to check the frets themselves to make sure that they are seated properly. I know on lower-end Chinese instruments the frets are often neglected. Hopefully that is not your case. Good luck!


  • Cereal
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1239

    • March 16, 2011, 12:51:55 pm
    • Earth
    more
Re: Guitar - climate change - humidity
« Reply #7 on: June 16, 2011, 01:34:49 pm »
Sounds to me like a truss rod issue as mentioned. It's an easy fix. Hold your guitar up at eye level and from the bottom stare down the neck. It should have a slight hump in the middle. I believe turning the truss rod counter-clockwise will loosen the truss - reduce the hump. Either way don't give it more than a couple of turns without checking the neck and playability. A little goes a long way.
"The urge to destroy is also a creative urge."
Bakunin


Re: Guitar - climate change - humidity
« Reply #8 on: June 16, 2011, 02:35:13 pm »
thanks so much guys thats really helpful :-)


--- i know the temp between jan - now has changed loads so guess it would have affected the wood somewhat - thanks guys

i think it prob the truss rod, im debatin whether to leave this and take it to a shop back in the uk in late august ...

thanks again folks~!


  • klorptar
  • Veteran

    • 134

    • September 15, 2010, 08:35:45 am
    • Ulsan, South Korea
Re: Guitar - climate change - humidity
« Reply #9 on: June 16, 2011, 02:44:15 pm »
Is it acoustic or electric?