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  • gogators!
  • Waygook Lord

    • 6383

    • March 16, 2016, 04:35:48 pm
    • Seoul
Re: Nearly got baited into deportation?
« Reply #60 on: September 23, 2022, 10:05:06 am »
Some do. I assumed most of us want to march to the beat of their own path. But my dad was a heavy-smoking mechanical engineer who hunted and fished as hobbies, retired to farm fruit trees and construct buildings for charity. No following in those footsteps pour moi. Even less so if he had been a banker or lawyer (do you know a single human who pined to follow their parent in such?). keyboard warriorSecurity buys you a secured plot in the ground and guaranteed wet eyelids on funeral day.

Maybe that's the story of the deported: they tried to beat the rules and ended up escorted closer to the same place.
Farrah, Harrell and Morgan are three law firms with fathers and sons that come immediately to mind. Don't really know any bankers, but here's one: Mnuchin graduated from Yale in 1985 and started working for Goldman Sachs, where his father had been employed since 1957.

Security puts a roof over your head, clothes and your back, and food on your table. It continues to do so when the wolf is at your door.

There's no death penalty for teaching privates.

As for assumptions, I think you could learn a lesson from Deputy Barney Fife.


  • gogators!
  • Waygook Lord

    • 6383

    • March 16, 2016, 04:35:48 pm
    • Seoul
Re: Nearly got baited into deportation?
« Reply #61 on: September 23, 2022, 10:08:48 am »
Yes, age out. Do you think hagwon directors will continue employing you into your 90s until one morning you die of old age in your hagwon provided bed? You might scoff but you should probably prepare a contingency, because without a better visa than the E-2 they won't let you remain here. Not doing a wind-up act here, genuinely curious
I knew a guy like that who really wanted to stay in Korea until the very end. After finally getting told to hit the road by his university, to which he was donating a million won here and a million won there to keep his job, got a copy editor job at the Korea Times or Herald. He made it into his 70s but he finally had to return to the US.


  • VanIslander
  • Moderator LVL 1

    • 4043

    • June 02, 2011, 10:12:19 am
    • South Gyeongsang province for 13 years (with a 7-year Jeju interlude)
    more
Re: Nearly got baited into deportation?
« Reply #62 on: September 23, 2022, 10:32:13 am »
Security puts a roof over your head, clothes and your back, and food on your table. It continues to do so when the wolf is at your door.
Somebody has been watching insurance commercials and forgetting how to disarm any dog, wolf or bully (it is a simple hard swift action).

Quote
There's no death penalty for teaching privates.
TRUE. i got no issue with law breakers willing to live with the consquences; to wit, violating your visa terms could see you deported.

I just replied to a very risk-adverse and a risk-taking teacher. Most of us live inbetween.
Life's to live! Live! Breathe. Relax. Enjoy. Animals teach us to focus on family, friends and avoid danger. Get what you need and get along with others. That said, some rock the boat, but they know capsizin' it means they're sunk. Some sink, let's swim! The sea's big, great, but has undercurrents.


Re: Nearly got baited into deportation?
« Reply #63 on: September 23, 2022, 10:41:27 am »
I know someone who got forced out. Old place let her go, and no one else wanted to hire her. She ended up going back home to the States. She was in her 60s, no idea what she got up to after that. She WAS a teacher prior to coming to Korea, but she'd been here for something like 30 years? Never got married in all that time, never tried to switch to an F visa.

I'm sure if she'd looked around hard enough she might've found something, but the doors do start to close once you hit middle age. You've got to increase your qualifications to keep them open. A bachelors and an E2 is only going to take you so far here.