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  • hangook77
  • Waygook Lord

    • 5524

    • September 14, 2017, 09:10:12 am
    • Near Busan
1. Most of the people rubbed the wrong way tend to fall into one of two camps- A) Those that love to b*tch about Korea and B) Those that fall into the "My Team" view of politics. Also, those two often overlap. Also, most of the people who have an issue tend to be close to 60 years old, and well, to be frank, you can kind of see their world view is a bit dated.
2. Say what you will, but I amongst the word salad, I do argue the point. If you look at the responses most of them just focus on me, rather than the issue.

Notice how most haven't addressed the following points yet (or just barely touched on them, aside from the last one)-
1. That Koreans can play whatever music they damn well please
2. That no, we aren't diverse when it comes to our music back home
3. That in fact, Korea plays more outside music than we do back home
4. That there actually was a decent amount of western music played in stores in 2008-2012
5. That while Korean music was played more then than now, it was also during a big boom cycle
6. That people would still b*tch and moan if Koreans were playing songs in Korean from China/Vietnam/Singapore/Japan and so their beef is completely imaginary (and clearly tinged with bigotry)
7. That "5" has never constituted a host in any way, shape or form.

Music is way more diverse back home.

Blues, country, rock, latin music, pop music, r&b, rap, punk, metal, etc.  So many types of music, more than just K pop or some old style performers. 
Trolls on here are lame and need to get a life.


Music is way more diverse back home.

Blues, country, rock, latin music, pop music, r&b, rap, punk, metal, etc.  So many types of music, more than just K pop or some old style performers.
Well in terms of genre, I'd agree.

When it comes to music in stores, generally we're talking about a select few genres- pop to easy listening to oldies are mostly it. Either that or jazz/classical that functions more as muzak than music. However in terms of diversity in terms of country of origin, I wouldn't really say our music back home is diverse in that sense. 

In fact in terms of music in stores, Korea might be slightly more diverse genre-wise in that while just like back home you get pop to easy listening to oldies (trot) and muzak, you also get rap music blasting at odd times. Then again, in the South, you might get country being played in stores, so I guess that cancels out the random rap song in Korea.

Regardless, I don't really see what the issue is- Why does it bother people that Koreans play Korean music in Korea?
« Last Edit: May 03, 2022, 01:35:15 pm by Mr.DeMartino »


  • pkjh
  • The Legend

    • 2312

    • May 02, 2012, 02:59:44 pm
    • Asia
Music is way more diverse back home.

Blues, country, rock, latin music, pop music, r&b, rap, punk, metal, etc.  So many types of music, more than just K pop or some old style performers. 
There's quite a large diverse underground scene that 99.99% of foreigners don't know about. As of today only a few hip-hop artist have managed to come out of the underground to compete against the mainstream teeny-pop Kpop groups. And only a handful of rock groups have made it.


There's quite a large diverse underground scene that 99.99% of foreigners don't know about. As of today only a few hip-hop artist have managed to come out of the underground to compete against the mainstream teeny-pop Kpop groups. And only a handful of rock groups have made it.
This is true too. There's Korean grindcore and Korean country music out there and so on.

Part of it is the differing cultural views on music. Westerners, and particularly hipsters (but also normal people), tend to view music as some sort of expression of individual identity and uniqueness. Hence, hipsterdom, where people get upset if TOO many people dislike the same music. In some cases it becomes an almost pathological aversion to anything popular. Certainly this isn't everyone or even the majority of people but it is a noticeable thing in plenty of people.

Conversely, many cultures, including Koreans, view music as a more social or communal thing. It is something to be shared. A way to bring to people together, hence why the most dominant musical activity in Korea by far is noraebang, where people come together to sing together to increase social bonds and have fun. In that case you want to know the same songs and be able to sing together. And when there's that kind of impetus, there's going to be a more homogenous view towards music, though this isn't a rock-hard rule, just a general guideline and certainly not something you'd want to pigeon-hole anyone into either Korean or back home in regards to music. Plenty of people back home, particularly ethnic minorities or certain religious communities are more apt to see music as something social and communal.