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  • waygo0k
  • The Legend

    • 4683

    • September 27, 2011, 11:51:01 am
    • Chungnam
Re: Teaching at 5 schools?!?!?
« Reply #20 on: February 28, 2022, 06:18:50 pm »
TIL EPIK teaching may well be on its last legs.

I wonder how many more public school teachers are doing 4+ schools out there simultaneously.


  • Augustiner
  • Expert Waygook

    • 531

    • December 06, 2021, 01:18:06 pm
    • Anyang
Re: Teaching at 5 schools?!?!?
« Reply #21 on: March 01, 2022, 12:05:44 pm »
Yeah, a weekend in Seoul was plenty for me. There is no way I could have lived and worked there. Give me the small town rural area every day.

I don’t get how people could put up with living in small town Korea. It’s not like they’re quaint charming villages in a bucolic setting. More like bleak faceless places where people are only there because they have to be.  I lived out in Yangpyeong for a few months.  Lovely natural setting and a town so ugly it’s like they made an effort. 


  • Liechtenstein
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1941

    • February 15, 2019, 04:39:00 pm
    • NE Hemisphere
Re: Teaching at 5 schools?!?!?
« Reply #22 on: March 01, 2022, 01:47:25 pm »
This is where I lived and the school I taught at for 5 years. In those 5 years I made precisely zero lesson plans. I had complete and total respect from the very friendly co-teachers, other teachers, VP, principal and administrator. I was treated like gold. I cleared 3.15 million a month. I barely desk-warmed. In at 10 am home at noon, when I had to DW.

I love to cook and bake and my first purchase was a nice counter-top oven. Every week I would bring in something: cake, carrot cake, cookies, banana bread, lemon-zucchini bread, lasagna, clam chowder, split-pea soup.....

We would cancel classes for entire afternoons to practice volleyball getting ready for a challenge from another school. It was very relaxing and nice.

I taught grades 3 to 9 and had a grand combined total of about 60 students which got smaller in number every year. They were all extremely well behaved and excellent students who tried hard.

In those 5 years I never...never...had a complete week of classes because something was always happening.

The town was very small but there was a great group of FT's, one really cool bar that let us play our own music. A surprisingly incredibly delicious pizza place owned by two older Korean women.

I taught sailing on the side. They treated my wife like a rockstar. There was a Baskin-Robbins and a really nice park to hang out in. Several big supermarkets that would actually order in FT food if they were asked.

I'm not a big-crowd party guy. I grew up in small towns. It was ideal for me. Plus there was a bus station and Seoul was a 4 hour ride away.

But all good things come to an end and I wanted to go home.

Imagine taking your English class out to the beach and throwing a frisbee around practicing vocab. I did that regularly with the complete blessing of the CT.

Not everybody's cup of tea to be sure. But I liked it.
« Last Edit: March 01, 2022, 01:52:06 pm by Liechtenstein »


Re: Teaching at 5 schools?!?!?
« Reply #23 on: March 01, 2022, 06:23:53 pm »
Sangju Beach is one of the nicest places in Korea. How did you land that position? Sheer luck?


  • hangook77
  • Waygook Lord

    • 5508

    • September 14, 2017, 09:10:12 am
    • Near Busan
Re: Teaching at 5 schools?!?!?
« Reply #24 on: March 02, 2022, 07:39:11 am »
Per week I have:
- 4 different schools (one is 10kms away, one is 17kms, one is 19, and the other (new this year) is 24km away.
- 16 separate lesson plans
- 14 different text books

3 of the 4 schools are super rural (my main school is in a town, so I do not get rural allowance  :sad: ), and 2 of them do not have bus routes that would allow me to reach them before 10, or get home before 7 (luckily, I have car, which I bought for this exact issue!).

   Considering that nearly half the EPIK teachers in this area complain about being put in schools ridiculously far away from their main schools, I feel that the municipal office of education really doesn't put much consideration into where they send their EPIK teachers. Having played a lot of resource management sims, I know that I could clean up this huge logistics fail no problemo!
Hmm. I wonder if I should stop by the office and offer my services.

Once covid is done, more folks ought to leave.  Rural pay is still sort of okay as a level 1 plus.  But salaries haven't gone up in years.  Sounds like some of the rural schools have gone full retard.  I did a couple of far aways years ago, but they let me come in late and let me leave early due to the busing system.  If they don't, don't renew your contract and get out of there.  In my area, I know so many teachers over the past year or so who have left and these are people who have been here for 10 to 15 years.  Though my province has extra ad ons that is pissing everyone off and burning them out. 

I just got off a long vacation so I have yet to see how things will be this year.  Hopefully more relaxed than last year. 

BTW  I have had 4 schools in a regional city since the fall of 2020.  All elementary.  (I use to do middle schools up until a few years ago.  Sometimes, I only went to one school for the year.  I hated that.  Needed a change in my routine.)
745sticky, Augustiner, Bakeacake, D.L.Orean, Lazio, Mithras, Renma, Rye are still blocked and I can't see them.


  • Kyndo
  • Moderator LVL 1

    • I am a geek!!

    • March 02, 2027, 11:00:00 pm
    • Gyeongsangbuk-do
Re: Teaching at 5 schools?!?!?
« Reply #25 on: March 02, 2022, 08:07:54 am »
Once covid is done, more folks ought to leave.  Rural pay is still sort of okay as a level 1 plus.  But salaries haven't gone up in years.  Sounds like some of the rural schools have become a lot more restrictive.  I did a couple of far aways years ago, but they let me come in late and let me leave early due to the busing system.  If they don't, don't renew your contract and get out of there.  In my area, I know so many teachers over the past year or so who have left and these are people who have been here for 10 to 15 years.  Though my province has extra ad ons that is pissing everyone off and burning them out. 

Yeah, gone are the days when you could just kind of wing it.
But, to be fair, as a teacher one shouldn't be doing that anyway.
I understand that many EPIKers aren't treated as a full teacher, but I seem to have lucked out with that: all my schools seem very on board with the way I do things. I make sure I teach the materials in the book so that the kids pass their curriculum based tests, and in return all my schools pretty much let me decide how I go about doing that. Being treated like a professional makes my job a lot more fulfilling. Despite everything I posted about earlier, I'm pretty happy with my work situation.

Wages have been stagnant for years, true, and that's super frustrating.  :sad:
But with all the opportunities for completely legit overtime ("after school programs" from 2 to 4 in the primary schools, for example), it's pretty easy to tack on an extra million or so per month. It takes being proactive, a lot of networking, and a bit of luck, but where there's a will, there's usually a way, especially for those teachers who have lived in Korea for a while, and work/have worked in multiple schools.



  • hangook77
  • Waygook Lord

    • 5508

    • September 14, 2017, 09:10:12 am
    • Near Busan
Re: Teaching at 5 schools?!?!?
« Reply #26 on: March 02, 2022, 08:35:04 am »
Yeah, gone are the days when you could just kind of wing it.
But, to be fair, as a teacher one shouldn't be doing that anyway.
I understand that many EPIKers aren't treated as a full teacher, but I seem to have lucked out with that: all my schools seem very on board with the way I do things. I make sure I teach the materials in the book so that the kids pass their curriculum based tests, and in return all my schools pretty much let me decide how I go about doing that. Being treated like a professional makes my job a lot more fulfilling. Despite everything I posted about earlier, I'm pretty happy with my work situation.

Wages have been stagnant for years, true, and that's super frustrating.  :sad:
But with all the opportunities for completely legit overtime ("after school programs" from 2 to 4 in the primary schools, for example), it's pretty easy to tack on an extra million or so per month. It takes being proactive, a lot of networking, and a bit of luck, but where there's a will, there's usually a way, especially for those teachers who have lived in Korea for a while, and work/have worked in multiple schools.



So far as I know most of these afterschool classes aren't given out to foreign teachers.  I do teach some extra classes at the ed office for part of a semester and it pays quite well for the time there.  But honestly none of my schools have given out any extra classes for pay.  I had one MIddle School several years back do that and I had another school do it but include as my 22 as I was there 5 days a week.  (The first Middle School did pay me some extra at the end of the semester and it was maybe a few hundred thousand won.)  Not that much overtime available really.  Out of how many of us teach in this mid sized town there are only two of us who do this extra night teaching. 

I seriously doubt most folks are earning a million extra won a month from extra teaching year round.  They would be a tiny exception to the rule.  While I am in the 3s, most folks are still in the low to mid 2s excluding housing and making none extra or very little extra.  The reality is if EPIK wants more but pays less, then they will lose long term as they only get inexperienced kids come here for a gap year not caring about teaching.  They realize Korean life in rural where ever's ville is nothing like the Korean drama on Netflix in Seoul and bail. 

As I said, a ton of long termers like 10 to 15 years have all quit in the past year.  It's quite shocking and even I wrestled with with it last spring and summer.  Covid has others staying put for now.  But once this clears up, Korea is going to have to face a reckoning.  More rules and BS provisions in the contract, raise the pay.  If not, bye bye.  Many have already voted with their feet. 

I should add most of those "after school" classes are not supposed to be offered legally to us.  There is another type of class that can be offered to us, but not those ones where the parent pay a fee for them.
745sticky, Augustiner, Bakeacake, D.L.Orean, Lazio, Mithras, Renma, Rye are still blocked and I can't see them.


  • Kyndo
  • Moderator LVL 1

    • I am a geek!!

    • March 02, 2027, 11:00:00 pm
    • Gyeongsangbuk-do
Re: Teaching at 5 schools?!?!?
« Reply #27 on: March 02, 2022, 08:45:30 am »
So far as I know most of these afterschool classes aren't given out to foreign teachers.
I should add most of those "after school" classes are not supposed to be offered legally to us.  There is another type of class that can be offered to us, but not those ones where the parent pay a fee for them.
You're right. Not all elementary schools offer after school classes.

But, if you're keen on doing them, I'd recommend asking your schools about them anyway. Mention the afterschool programmes specifically. It's what I did, and as a result I've been teaching them at my Wednesday and Friday schools for a couple semesters now.

Generally speaking, the programmes are run by the school, but the funding comes from the municipality, so technically, I'm still working for the same employer. I signed separate contracts, provided my CV and health exam results etc etc, but I also went and got permission from my main school. The latter took a while but everything was eventually approved. In my specific situation, I'm certain that it's all above board.

   It *is* possible, and they can be a lot of fun. It's nice having 100% control of the curriculum!
   Again, I'd strongly recommend being proactive: mention your willingness to do them if that's something you're interested in. You might get lucky!  :smiley:
« Last Edit: March 02, 2022, 08:49:59 am by Kyndo »


Re: Teaching at 5 schools?!?!?
« Reply #28 on: March 02, 2022, 12:31:49 pm »
Just heard of at least 3 people who are currently (or will be) teaching at 5 schools at the same time for EPIK.

This happened to a guy my first year here. He actually came here with his wife. She was assigned to two schools, he ended up with five, and he was absolutely furious about it, lol. I don't remember the details but I think three of those schools were rural.

I was just glad it wasn't me at the time, but the following year I got assigned to four schools, lol. I kind of lucked out in that two of those schools were using books that I had already made material for, I just needed to adjust them.

Most years I've had three schools, like this year I have two schools in my town and one rural school out in the boonies. My main school doesn't ever change, and I tend to get the same secondary schools for a couple of years before one or more of them get shutdown, and then there's a shuffle for new assignments.

When I last checked, EPIK isn't supposed to place teachers in any schools that take more than 60 minutes to get to using public transport. And if reliable/reasonable public transport isn't available, then the schools have to arrange for a way to get the NETs there (which they usually do by having the NET ride with a KT who also has to commute there from the same area). It really speaks volumes about the characters of the people in said schools if they're going to try to force a NET to commute 3-4 hours by bus what could take 30-40 minutes by car, especially if they KNOW that NETs typically only stay for a year or two so why in the **** would they buy a car?

It's fine if a NET chooses to buy a car to use for their own convenience, but I won't ever allow a school to force that choice on me, lol. You want me to work at a certain location, then you need to work out the logistics for how I'm getting there. Because that shit isn't on me.  >:(
« Last Edit: March 02, 2022, 12:35:18 pm by Chinguetti »


  • Bakeacake
  • Super Waygook

    • 455

    • July 12, 2010, 01:35:40 pm
    • Pohang South Korea
Re: Teaching at 5 schools?!?!?
« Reply #29 on: March 02, 2022, 01:07:55 pm »
2017 was my final year with EPIK. In that year i was given a school that was a 1hour 30 minute DRIVE away. The first day I decided to take the bus to that school to see if it was possible. I got on the first possible bus at 530 am to make my transfer. Got on that bus at 6:15. That bus then led to another which would take me the rest of the way. The bus that went past the school, did so 3 times a day. The first bus (which i missed) would have gotten me there at 8am. The next bus, which I caught, got me there at 1pm. I politely told them that its impossible for me to get to school on time because of this. I then told them that I would have to catch the bus back home at 7pm from the school. I arrived home that day at 9:30pm.

I had a motorcycle at the time, and knew the route well. Its a snaking mountainside that i had ridden on the bike many times. The following week when i took my motorcycle (Honda CB400), i took some liberties getting through traffic and maneuvering to the front of the line at red lights. It took me 50 minutes to get there. I explained to them that I wouldnt be coming to this school if it were raining, snowing, or freezing cold. The following 3 weeks it rained on a monday and I called in sick each day. My main school coteacher became understandably upset. I explained to her that the mountain road is very icy and dangerous in wet weather. and that i wouldnt be able to make it there by bus in time, or by motorcycle safely. she then told me that id have to get a doctors note explaining my absence. I told her that its a lot easier for me to get a doctors note and take the day off than it was to travel to that school. So thats what I did.  She was very angry. I did that for all 11 of my alotted sick days in the epik contract. This middle school had 12 students. it would have been cheaper to bus all of them to a decent middle school every day than employ the 12 teachers that worked there.

After that year I quit. Been working at a hagwon since then with better hours, much better pay, and have never been happier. EPIK sucks


  • hangook77
  • Waygook Lord

    • 5508

    • September 14, 2017, 09:10:12 am
    • Near Busan
Re: Teaching at 5 schools?!?!?
« Reply #30 on: March 02, 2022, 01:44:13 pm »
2017 was my final year with EPIK. In that year i was given a school that was a 1hour 30 minute DRIVE away. The first day I decided to take the bus to that school to see if it was possible. I got on the first possible bus at 530 am to make my transfer. Got on that bus at 6:15. That bus then led to another which would take me the rest of the way. The bus that went past the school, did so 3 times a day. The first bus (which i missed) would have gotten me there at 8am. The next bus, which I caught, got me there at 1pm. I politely told them that its impossible for me to get to school on time because of this. I then told them that I would have to catch the bus back home at 7pm from the school. I arrived home that day at 9:30pm.

I had a motorcycle at the time, and knew the route well. Its a snaking mountainside that i had ridden on the bike many times. The following week when i took my motorcycle (Honda CB400), i took some liberties getting through traffic and maneuvering to the front of the line at red lights. It took me 50 minutes to get there. I explained to them that I wouldnt be coming to this school if it were raining, snowing, or freezing cold. The following 3 weeks it rained on a monday and I called in sick each day. My main school coteacher became understandably upset. I explained to her that the mountain road is very icy and dangerous in wet weather. and that i wouldnt be able to make it there by bus in time, or by motorcycle safely. she then told me that id have to get a doctors note explaining my absence. I told her that its a lot easier for me to get a doctors note and take the day off than it was to travel to that school. So thats what I did.  She was very angry. I did that for all 11 of my alotted sick days in the epik contract. This middle school had 12 students. it would have been cheaper to bus all of them to a decent middle school every day than employ the 12 teachers that worked there.

After that year I quit. Been working at a hagwon since then with better hours, much better pay, and have never been happier. EPIK sucks

I am surprised they made you take the bus home at 7 instead of letting you leave early.  There was one school impossible to get to on time that others went to in my area and so some Korean teachers drove there and they picked up the native teacher and rode in together and did the same thing at the end of the day.  Otherwise, it was so far far away it would have been impossible.  Another school I did go to not as far away the teacher told me to catch the bus at 9 10 am because it took me a while to walk and meet this bus.  Then it was almost an hour ride.  Then she let me take the 3:20 bus out and bus it home for an hour.  This was years ago though.  Most other schools were more like 20 to 25 minutes away by bus and some schools a couple of days a week were in the town proper so you could walk or bike.  Usually 2 or 3 days in the town and a couple more on the outskirts with one day being really insanely far.  Either way, was there no teacher who lived in the main town who drove to that school who could have picked you up for that school?  They sound pretty mean and selfish there.  But it does seem they got that way over time.  I drive now and live in a regional city so kind of a moot point to me now. 


Any hakwons with decent hours that pay 3 million plus housing on top of that in Seoul area may tempt me in the future if that's what you mean by a good hakwon. 
« Last Edit: March 02, 2022, 01:47:20 pm by hangook77 »
745sticky, Augustiner, Bakeacake, D.L.Orean, Lazio, Mithras, Renma, Rye are still blocked and I can't see them.


Re: Teaching at 5 schools?!?!?
« Reply #31 on: March 02, 2022, 01:57:31 pm »
It's possible that there were no teachers available, but it's far more likely that no KT wanted the responsibility because "it's not their job." It's a common excuse I've heard from different sources here and there. But what they and the schools fail to consider is that it's also not the NET's job or responsibility to commute ****** hours out to a school that they didn't choose to teach at. It's literally in their contracts, and it's the ****** school that requested to have a NET in the first place WITH the understanding that the commute to the school would be reasonable.

If a reasonable commute is not possible, it is most definitely the school's responsibility to figure out how the NET will get there (some people don't seem to know this, but it's something that those schools actually agree to), and sometimes they try to force that onto the NETs (the logic being the NET should just buy a car or something, but no, that's not fair to the NET, especially when it's the school that requested the ****** NET in the first place -- trying to force a NET into buying a car just to teach at your school is basically like trying to force a NET to pay to teach at your school. No, **** off with that. Either arrange for reliable and reasonable transportation, or don't ****** request a NET).

I can sort of understand why someone would feel put out for being "assigned" the job of picking up and dropping off the NET, especially if they're not being offered some sort of compensation at least for gas, but that's between them and the school. That's not the NET's fault or responsibility, and I really hate to say it but a KT who'd rather force a NET to commute hours to school than go 10 minutes out of their way once a week is absolutely a selfish asshole. It's such a lack of consideration and compassion. Even if I felt put out, I wouldn't take that out on the NET. The NET didn't choose to go there, and by the stipulations of their contract they shouldn't have been placed there in the first place. If and when they are, it's because the schools agreed to arrange for transport.

It's just that some NETs don't realize this, and some schools don't do their ****** jobs.
« Last Edit: March 02, 2022, 02:24:09 pm by Chinguetti »


  • Liechtenstein
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1941

    • February 15, 2019, 04:39:00 pm
    • NE Hemisphere
Re: Teaching at 5 schools?!?!?
« Reply #32 on: March 02, 2022, 04:02:44 pm »
Sangju Beach is one of the nicest places in Korea. How did you land that position? Sheer luck?

Yeah man. Luck.

I was dealing with a recruiter who asked me what I wanted. I said I wanted a rural school close to Changnyeong and Geoje Island where two friends were. Namhae forms a nice triangle between them, about 2 hours drive any direction.

They put me there. I was the 4th FT in 4 years. Everybody else buggered off for the big city. My CT met me and picked me up and took me to dinner. She told me about the other FT's and how no one would stay and asked my plans. I told her that if I was treated well and with respect, I promised 5 years. She said that was fair and we both stuck to our word.

It was a weird situation. An EPIK school but privately owned. There were 9 teachers including me. My CT was #5 on the seniority list and was starting her 24th year of teaching at that school. All the other teachers had been there longer or nearly as long. They didn't move around like others did.

And you're right. Silver Sand beach (the one you're looking at) is the nicest beach I ever saw in Korea. It was never crowded like the beach in Busan. And several of the students I taught had parents who owned chicken shops or a mini-mart. They'd keep an eye out for me and the Mrs. on weekends, and compete to see who could take care of us better! I do miss Korean chicken.

Luck....
« Last Edit: March 02, 2022, 04:05:30 pm by Liechtenstein »


  • waygo0k
  • The Legend

    • 4683

    • September 27, 2011, 11:51:01 am
    • Chungnam
Re: Teaching at 5 schools?!?!?
« Reply #33 on: March 02, 2022, 09:59:51 pm »
It's possible that there were no teachers available, but it's far more likely that no KT wanted the responsibility because "it's not their job." It's a common excuse I've heard from different sources here and there. But what they and the schools fail to consider is that it's also not the NET's job or responsibility to commute ****** hours out to a school that they didn't choose to teach at. It's literally in their contracts, and it's the ****** school that requested to have a NET in the first place WITH the understanding that the commute to the school would be reasonable.

If a reasonable commute is not possible, it is most definitely the school's responsibility to figure out how the NET will get there (some people don't seem to know this, but it's something that those schools actually agree to), and sometimes they try to force that onto the NETs (the logic being the NET should just buy a car or something, but no, that's not fair to the NET, especially when it's the school that requested the ****** NET in the first place -- trying to force a NET into buying a car just to teach at your school is basically like trying to force a NET to pay to teach at your school. No, **** off with that. Either arrange for reliable and reasonable transportation, or don't ****** request a NET).

I can sort of understand why someone would feel put out for being "assigned" the job of picking up and dropping off the NET, especially if they're not being offered some sort of compensation at least for gas, but that's between them and the school. That's not the NET's fault or responsibility, and I really hate to say it but a KT who'd rather force a NET to commute hours to school than go 10 minutes out of their way once a week is absolutely a selfish asshole. It's such a lack of consideration and compassion. Even if I felt put out, I wouldn't take that out on the NET. The NET didn't choose to go there, and by the stipulations of their contract they shouldn't have been placed there in the first place. If and when they are, it's because the schools agreed to arrange for transport.

It's just that some NETs don't realize this, and some schools don't do their ****** jobs.

This is the age old question of how lucky a NET will be when it comes to their placement. Some luck out with great schools, great living conditions and great colleagues…others get the complete opposite…and most are somewhere in between.

It seems the EPIK pendulum is swinging more and more in the direction of not so great living and working conditions, add to that stagnant pay and dwindling benefits. Where else can ESL teachers go? China is now a bust at least for ESL (but there are still plenty of teaching jobs available), Japan doesn’t seem to know what it wants, SE Asia has low pay, same with South America and Africa, Europe is at war (yes, not all of Europe)…the only real viable place as of now is the Middle East, which will result in a flood of applicants flocking there, thereby eventually making the place almost as unviable as the rest.


  • L I
  • Waygook Lord

    • 7842

    • October 03, 2011, 01:50:58 pm
Re: Teaching at 5 schools?!?!?
« Reply #34 on: March 02, 2022, 10:04:02 pm »
China is now a bust at least for ESL

What happened?


  • waygo0k
  • The Legend

    • 4683

    • September 27, 2011, 11:51:01 am
    • Chungnam
Re: Teaching at 5 schools?!?!?
« Reply #35 on: March 02, 2022, 10:48:43 pm »
Training centres (Chinese equivalent of hagwons) are all but extinct due to the new laws (down by 92-95%%). Some Chinese public schools still hire ESL teachers.

Private schools prefer to hire subject teachers for their international programs, they also hire some ESL staff but nowhere near as many as before. New rules coming in soon say the Chinese government wants no more than 5% of Chinese kids to be in international programs around the country…there is already scrutiny on sub par private schools running sub par programs (basically private schools that have poor reputations as edutainment centres).

The only real safe havens are proper international schools, and government approved private and public schools running their own international programs.

Essentially, China is weaning itself off edutainment and the whole ESL rodeo. Demographically speaking, there are at least 200 million school aged children in China…if 5% are in international programs, that still means there will be 10 million customers…meaning there will still be plenty of jobs, just more serious ones.
« Last Edit: March 02, 2022, 10:53:00 pm by waygo0k »


  • hangook77
  • Waygook Lord

    • 5508

    • September 14, 2017, 09:10:12 am
    • Near Busan
Re: Teaching at 5 schools?!?!?
« Reply #36 on: March 03, 2022, 07:31:37 am »
It's possible that there were no teachers available, but it's far more likely that no KT wanted the responsibility because "it's not their job." It's a common excuse I've heard from different sources here and there. But what they and the schools fail to consider is that it's also not the NET's job or responsibility to commute ****** hours out to a school that they didn't choose to teach at. It's literally in their contracts, and it's the ****** school that requested to have a NET in the first place WITH the understanding that the commute to the school would be reasonable.

If a reasonable commute is not possible, it is most definitely the school's responsibility to figure out how the NET will get there (some people don't seem to know this, but it's something that those schools actually agree to), and sometimes they try to force that onto the NETs (the logic being the NET should just buy a car or something, but no, that's not fair to the NET, especially when it's the school that requested the ****** NET in the first place -- trying to force a NET into buying a car just to teach at your school is basically like trying to force a NET to pay to teach at your school. No, **** off with that. Either arrange for reliable and reasonable transportation, or don't ****** request a NET).

I can sort of understand why someone would feel put out for being "assigned" the job of picking up and dropping off the NET, especially if they're not being offered some sort of compensation at least for gas, but that's between them and the school. That's not the NET's fault or responsibility, and I really hate to say it but a KT who'd rather force a NET to commute hours to school than go 10 minutes out of their way once a week is absolutely a selfish asshole. It's such a lack of consideration and compassion. Even if I felt put out, I wouldn't take that out on the NET. The NET didn't choose to go there, and by the stipulations of their contract they shouldn't have been placed there in the first place. If and when they are, it's because the schools agreed to arrange for transport.

It's just that some NETs don't realize this, and some schools don't do their ****** jobs.

Well, keep pushing.  More and more teachers are leaving.  Korea ain't the only gig in town anymore.  And it's not even good paying anymore either.
745sticky, Augustiner, Bakeacake, D.L.Orean, Lazio, Mithras, Renma, Rye are still blocked and I can't see them.


  • hangook77
  • Waygook Lord

    • 5508

    • September 14, 2017, 09:10:12 am
    • Near Busan
Re: Teaching at 5 schools?!?!?
« Reply #37 on: March 03, 2022, 07:36:06 am »
Training centres (Chinese equivalent of hagwons) are all but extinct due to the new laws (down by 92-95%%). Some Chinese public schools still hire ESL teachers.

Private schools prefer to hire subject teachers for their international programs, they also hire some ESL staff but nowhere near as many as before. New rules coming in soon say the Chinese government wants no more than 5% of Chinese kids to be in international programs around the country…there is already scrutiny on sub par private schools running sub par programs (basically private schools that have poor reputations as edutainment centres).

The only real safe havens are proper international schools, and government approved private and public schools running their own international programs.

Essentially, China is weaning itself off edutainment and the whole ESL rodeo. Demographically speaking, there are at least 200 million school aged children in China…if 5% are in international programs, that still means there will be 10 million customers…meaning there will still be plenty of jobs, just more serious ones.

People keep saying that.  But there are plenty of kindys and other places to work at.  Lots of jobs offered online though admittedly many want you to be in China.  Check the Facebook groups.  Daves is kind of mediocre.  I do believe many foreign owned language schools were running into issues, though some like low paying EF still seems to survive.  (I'd avoid them.)  But on the whole you have still plenty of jobs with decent pay though the pay seems to be lower to get into China first year with the chance to make more once in China.  I also knew quite a few with just a Bachelors and no Ed degree who got on making decent pay at an international school.  They even liked having their own classroom. 
745sticky, Augustiner, Bakeacake, D.L.Orean, Lazio, Mithras, Renma, Rye are still blocked and I can't see them.


  • Kayos
  • The Legend

    • 2402

    • March 31, 2016, 07:13:57 pm
    • NZ
Re: Teaching at 5 schools?!?!?
« Reply #38 on: March 03, 2022, 07:44:01 am »
Training centres (Chinese equivalent of hagwons) are all but extinct due to the new laws (down by 92-95%%). Some Chinese public schools still hire ESL teachers.

Private schools prefer to hire subject teachers for their international programs, they also hire some ESL staff but nowhere near as many as before. New rules coming in soon say the Chinese government wants no more than 5% of Chinese kids to be in international programs around the country…there is already scrutiny on sub par private schools running sub par programs (basically private schools that have poor reputations as edutainment centres).

The only real safe havens are proper international schools, and government approved private and public schools running their own international programs.

Essentially, China is weaning itself off edutainment and the whole ESL rodeo. Demographically speaking, there are at least 200 million school aged children in China…if 5% are in international programs, that still means there will be 10 million customers…meaning there will still be plenty of jobs, just more serious ones.

From what my Chinese ex-girlfriend told me recently, the Chinese government doesn't want foreign teachers in public schools anymore entirely, and are trying to phase them out. My ex is a Chinese teacher in a public school in China, who teaches English.


  • waygo0k
  • The Legend

    • 4683

    • September 27, 2011, 11:51:01 am
    • Chungnam
Re: Teaching at 5 schools?!?!?
« Reply #39 on: March 03, 2022, 08:25:06 am »
People keep saying that.  But there are plenty of kindys and other places to work at.  Lots of jobs offered online though admittedly many want you to be in China.  Check the Facebook groups.  Daves is kind of mediocre.  I do believe many foreign owned language schools were running into issues, though some like low paying EF still seems to survive.  (I'd avoid them.)  But on the whole you have still plenty of jobs with decent pay though the pay seems to be lower to get into China first year with the chance to make more once in China.  I also knew quite a few with just a Bachelors and no Ed degree who got on making decent pay at an international school.  They even liked having their own classroom. 

These jobs are disappearing fast…even kindy jobs. Basically any type of non-formal education involving foreigners is being phased out. Teaching online is a possibility, but you must be in china to do that according to Chinese law, meaning any school that employs online teachers who are outside China would face punishment.

EF is practically dead. One of the remaining last bastions (Nanjing) just shuttered its doors without notice, leaving all foreign staff unpaid since December and owing parents 2 million USD in tuition fees. I repeat…the days of planning to just turn up and wing it through a day of ESL lessons are dead in China.

Speaking of international schools, there are several classifications:

*true international schools that only accept foreign passport holders - these are the safest places to be right now

*true international schools that have government permission to accept Chinese passport holders - these are also safe for now, but will be subject to the 5% rule when it comes to effect

*rent a name international schools (e.g. harrow, wellington, eton etc) - these are NOT international schools, but mere private schools masquerading as international…they pay royalties to the “parent” schools in the west for the privilege of using their name. Many of these places are on the chopping block because they don’t have the right government permissions to run the international programs they have.

*private schools with international programs - these are also on the chopping block because many don’t have the right government permissions to run their international programs, especially the very badly run ones. The 5% rule will also apply to these when it comes into effect.

*public schools with international programs - these are fairly safe, the more prestigious the school is the safer you’ll be. The 5% rule will also apply to these when it comes into effect.

I should also add outside of the full international schools, the Chinese government has decided that ALL schools must align their k-9 curricula with the local Chinese curriculum wherever they are…that means a lot of international programs will lose the large fees paid by their k-9 students starting next semester.