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  • Bakeacake
  • Super Waygook

    • 263

    • July 12, 2010, 01:35:40 pm
    • Pohang South Korea
Re: Arrested in Korea for picture-taking. Any help or advice?
« Reply #60 on: January 25, 2022, 01:30:33 pm »
she might be a fitness model. like does competitions. similar to beauty pageants. The ex wife of a friend does this and she consistently would bring her competition outfit and heels to the gym to practice poses. Very glittery, much shine.


Re: Arrested in Korea for picture-taking. Any help or advice?
« Reply #61 on: January 25, 2022, 01:45:32 pm »
she might be a fitness model. like does competitions. similar to beauty pageants. The ex wife of a friend does this and she consistently would bring her competition outfit and heels to the gym to practice poses. Very glittery, much shine.

It'd be a bit ironic if a fitness model threw a hissy fit about someone taking a picture of her while she was posing


  • Bakeacake
  • Super Waygook

    • 263

    • July 12, 2010, 01:35:40 pm
    • Pohang South Korea
Re: Arrested in Korea for picture-taking. Any help or advice?
« Reply #62 on: January 25, 2022, 01:47:32 pm »
It'd be a bit ironic if a fitness model threw a hissy fit about someone taking a picture of her while she was posing
hahaha, beautiful. touche


  • Savant
  • The Legend

    • 3244

    • April 07, 2012, 11:35:31 pm
Re: Arrested in Korea for picture-taking. Any help or advice?
« Reply #63 on: January 25, 2022, 01:58:28 pm »
It'd be a bit ironic if a fitness model threw a hissy fit about someone taking a picture of her while she was posing

I get those pics from Instagram.


  • hangook77
  • Waygook Lord

    • 5044

    • September 14, 2017, 09:10:12 am
    • Near Busan
Re: Arrested in Korea for picture-taking. Any help or advice?
« Reply #64 on: January 25, 2022, 03:02:47 pm »
The woman was embarrassed by the photo taking and lost face.  This is payback.  OP did something dumb and has given her the means to get that payback.  Pretty straightforward.  You could go to great lengths, like catbird, as an excuse to dress up as a woman, but it won't make a difference.  It's not how you saw it that matters.  It's how she felt violated.  As a straight guy is it ok if I went and snapped a photo of another straight guy at my gym who's an absolute string bean but after every set goes and stands right in front of the mirror and flexes?  Obviously not. There would be some reaction.  OP is a guy who snapped a photo of a woman posing at his gym.  He's not even defending his actions. 



A legal system based on feelings is a reign of terror.  Evidence and proof might as well be thrown out the window.  Innocent until proven guilty mp longer need apply.  If she is going to accuse of him of sexual harassment, she should actually have proof.  A butt pic, a bent over pic, an up skirt pic?  Some other gestures with witnesses?  Feelings and false accusations cannot define a legal system in a free society.  If there is a penalty against taking people's pictures inside so be it.  But call it what it is.  A small fine and be done with it.  But lying and calling it sexual harassment because you simply want to see someone burn, ruining another person's life because of selfish feelings?  What is to be gained from that?  A payout?  There is no reason for taking it this far.  (Unless there is more to this that the OP is not telling us, in which case, I remove my argument.) 


Re: Arrested in Korea for picture-taking. Any help or advice?
« Reply #65 on: January 25, 2022, 03:26:58 pm »
A legal system based on feelings is a reign of terror.  Evidence and proof might as well be thrown out the window.  Innocent until proven guilty mp longer need apply.  If she is going to accuse of him of sexual harassment, she should actually have proof.  A butt pic, a bent over pic, an up skirt pic?  Some other gestures with witnesses?  Feelings and false accusations cannot define a legal system in a free society.  If there is a penalty against taking people's pictures inside so be it.  But call it what it is.  A small fine and be done with it.  But lying and calling it sexual harassment because you simply want to see someone burn, ruining another person's life because of selfish feelings?  What is to be gained from that?  A payout?  There is no reason for taking it this far.  (Unless there is more to this that the OP is not telling us, in which case, I remove my argument.)

I don't think it should be a matter for the law.  I agree wholeheartedly with that.  She's spinning it for her own reasons.  Unless, as you said, his story has been presented here as an alibi, but I'll accept his version at face/feet value. 
« Last Edit: January 26, 2022, 08:04:34 am by Augustiner »


  • Dazak
  • Explorer

    • 8

    • January 18, 2022, 11:57:49 pm
Re: Arrested in Korea for picture-taking. Any help or advice?
« Reply #66 on: January 25, 2022, 04:37:45 pm »
A legal system based on feelings is a reign of terror.  Evidence and proof might as well be thrown out the window.  Innocent until proven guilty mp longer need apply.  If she is going to accuse of him of sexual harassment, she should actually have proof.  A butt pic, a bent over pic, an up skirt pic?  Some other gestures with witnesses?  Feelings and false accusations cannot define a legal system in a free society.  If there is a penalty against taking people's pictures inside so be it.  But call it what it is.  A small fine and be done with it.  But lying and calling it sexual harassment because you simply want to see someone burn, ruining another person's life because of selfish feelings?  What is to be gained from that?  A payout?  There is no reason for taking it this far.  (Unless there is more to this that the OP is not telling us, in which case, I remove my argument.)

Unfortunately for me, all the proof she needs is my full-body photo of her (already described) and her feelings of shame that she described to the police. The content of the photo doesn't matter due to how the law is worded. I honestly wish the content did matter. I wish I could show the pic so my side can be more accurately shown, but as said, I have no interest in bringing the possibility of a distribution charge into things.

She's getting a payout for it - one larger than what lawyers told me to expect, but also one they said I didn't have much of a choice in not paying due to the wording of the law and my foreigner status. As a result, she agreed to drop the charges. Unfortunately, despite the charges being dropped, the prosecutor can still punish me if they want. Apparently, dropping charges used to be the end of it with these kinds of cases, but things have changed due to political reform and the prosecutor can decide to still issue a punishment - or they can decide to just drop the case altogether. I'm entirely at their mercy now, so all I can do is write reflection letters and gather character references.


  • hangook77
  • Waygook Lord

    • 5044

    • September 14, 2017, 09:10:12 am
    • Near Busan
Re: Arrested in Korea for picture-taking. Any help or advice?
« Reply #67 on: January 26, 2022, 10:25:17 am »
Unfortunately for me, all the proof she needs is my full-body photo of her (already described) and her feelings of shame that she described to the police. The content of the photo doesn't matter due to how the law is worded. I honestly wish the content did matter. I wish I could show the pic so my side can be more accurately shown, but as said, I have no interest in bringing the possibility of a distribution charge into things.

She's getting a payout for it - one larger than what lawyers told me to expect, but also one they said I didn't have much of a choice in not paying due to the wording of the law and my foreigner status. As a result, she agreed to drop the charges. Unfortunately, despite the charges being dropped, the prosecutor can still punish me if they want. Apparently, dropping charges used to be the end of it with these kinds of cases, but things have changed due to political reform and the prosecutor can decide to still issue a punishment - or they can decide to just drop the case altogether. I'm entirely at their mercy now, so all I can do is write reflection letters and gather character references.

Korea is seriously effed up and her feelings matter more than legal principal.  As for the prosecution giving them unchecked discretionary power is a set up for absolute abuse and control.  If someone with a career to rack up points decides to abuse you then it is not based on legal principal.  It is about control and manipulation.  This prosecution is making you "sweat it" out while they power trip.  Either way, the whole situation is complete BS.  When we all go home, this gives us all a push to fight to prevent feelings and political correctness from taking over our legal system.  When the rule of law and precedent is thrown out the window, we are in trouble.  It means any one of us can be set up and harassed based on others "feelings". 

As I said, you shouldn't have taken a pic.  But even so a 100k fine,  a warning, and a slap on the wrist is fine enough.  Korea is making a mountain out a mole hill.  (If it actually were sexual with proof of that, then perhaps it would be different.)


  • Liechtenstein
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1921

    • February 15, 2019, 04:39:00 pm
    • NE Hemisphere
Re: Arrested in Korea for picture-taking. Any help or advice?
« Reply #68 on: January 26, 2022, 11:27:56 am »
Remember when they had those dancing girls for a sale, a new store opening, new ownership etc?  They were often skimpily dressed, etc.  Some may have been girls next door and some may have been part time hookers.  (Of course I can tell you about backup dancers on TV who a friend who was friends with some high roller Koreans said they met them in room salons back in the day.  But, that's a whole other story.)  Anyways, I can recall some folks taking pictures of them because it was so unusual in order to show people back home.  We often said that in the west, feminists would be all over that kind of thing.  It was so shocking to us.  Well that and pink houses (though I think those are all gone now too). 

I remember them and I took pictures to send to my feminist friends back in Canada so they could see another slice of life. They didn't like them :-)


Re: Arrested in Korea for picture-taking. Any help or advice?
« Reply #69 on: January 26, 2022, 11:45:24 am »
As I said, you shouldn't have taken a pic.  But even so a 100k fine,  a warning, and a slap on the wrist is fine enough.  Korea is making a mountain out a mole hill.  (If it actually were sexual with proof of that, then perhaps it would be different.)
Dude, if a homeowner's association in the U.S. makes a stupid rule I don't say "America is making a mountain out of a mole hill." If Count Dankula goes down I don't say "The UK is making a mountain out of a mole hill."

You do this a lot- Just completely assign an entire country to one position or another. You really should try to use smaller groups than entire countries when assessing things.

As for why the law is the way it is, that's due to past cases where the burden of proof meant that women had a really tough time proving things.

As for feelings, feelings and state of mind have always been A PART of the law,  you know, mens rea. While I agree that there is too much consideration given to the feelings and perception of one party and not enough given to another, to claim that laws aren't based off of feelings is ridiculous. Whether a self-defense claimant felt afraid for their life. Whether the person intended great bodily harm, etc.


Re: Arrested in Korea for picture-taking. Any help or advice?
« Reply #70 on: January 27, 2022, 09:15:47 am »
Korea is seriously effed up and her feelings matter more than legal principal.  As for the prosecution giving them unchecked discretionary power is a set up for absolute abuse and control.  If someone with a career to rack up points decides to abuse you then it is not based on legal principal.  It is about control and manipulation.  This prosecution is making you "sweat it" out while they power trip.  Either way, the whole situation is complete BS.  When we all go home, this gives us all a push to fight to prevent feelings and political correctness from taking over our legal system.  When the rule of law and precedent is thrown out the window, we are in trouble.  It means any one of us can be set up and harassed based on others "feelings". 

As I said, you shouldn't have taken a pic.  But even so a 100k fine,  a warning, and a slap on the wrist is fine enough.  Korea is making a mountain out a mole hill.  (If it actually were sexual with proof of that, then perhaps it would be different.)

If you look at Korea's past... the government was a dictatorship, so everything, laws, and regulations all were set up in a way that allows for manipulation corruption, and protection of the powerful.
In this case, it is a foreigner going up against a Korean citizen, so of course, the police are going to give the Korean woman an upper hand in his mess. It doesn't matter what she feels, the law should be more clear, for first-time offenders taking a pic without any sexual intentions then a small fine, a warning, an apology, maybe going to a government program where foreigners can learn about Korean laws better would suffice.

This was a long time ago (maybe a decade back), but some foreigner went hiking up in the mountains and a bunch of ajjumas pulled out their cameras and started snapping pics of him like he was an exotic animal at the zoo. I wonder what the police would have done if he had gone and reported them and said that he felt humiliated and violated, and ashamed by their actions. Those ajjummas would have been off the hook real easy, and the foreigner would have probably been blamed and told "please understand their unique situation."



Re: Arrested in Korea for picture-taking. Any help or advice?
« Reply #71 on: January 27, 2022, 11:03:39 am »
Those ajjummas would have been off the hook real easy, and the foreigner would have probably been blamed and told "please understand their unique situation."
Perhaps, but I notice you didn't do a direct apples to apples comparison. What if a foreign girl had been in a gym and a random Korean guy took photos of her?

It might go like you said, but I think the odds would be different, probably because the police would be worried about the foreign woman going to either a women's rights organization or some other watchdog and they'd get in trouble if they didn't act. Might not be as easy, but it probably would get taken more seriously than your ajumma on the mountain example.

Also, it's far less likely that the police would prosecute a foreigner taking pictures of ajummas hiking on a mountain in their ajumma hiking gear and visors.


  • catbird
  • Waygookin

    • 16

    • November 17, 2021, 01:42:32 am
Re: Arrested in Korea for picture-taking. Any help or advice?
« Reply #72 on: January 28, 2022, 06:12:50 am »
How much money is there in this anyway?  When I wear my straw cowboy hat and sunglasses, it's pretty much the jackass equivalent of wearing high heels in a gym, as people photograph my unique situation the same way you photographed hers.  How much are you having to pay that lady?  I'm starting to think I need to do as the Romans and start capitalizing on this.


  • Mr C
  • The Legend

    • 3391

    • October 17, 2012, 03:00:40 pm
    • Seoul
Re: Arrested in Korea for picture-taking. Any help or advice?
« Reply #73 on: January 28, 2022, 11:18:49 am »
I recently took a photo of a guy on the subway wearing a camouflage patterned mask.  The joke being I was going to tell him to put on a mask. 

I hope I'm not in trouble.


  • Dazak
  • Explorer

    • 8

    • January 18, 2022, 11:57:49 pm
Re: Arrested in Korea for picture-taking. Any help or advice?
« Reply #74 on: March 23, 2022, 08:15:50 pm »
I'm back with the conclusion of my story. After waiting far too long, I finally received a letter from the prosecution in my mailbox.

Charges have been dropped and I will not be prosecuted. The settlement money is gone forever, but there will be no additional fines or external records of this case. As such, I can finally move on and feel some positivity for the future.


Re: Arrested in Korea for picture-taking. Any help or advice?
« Reply #75 on: March 23, 2022, 09:30:28 pm »
This conclusion was more anticipated than the series finale of LOST. Glad I finally got my closure.

Now about that pic, hit up the ol' inbox, or, if need be, you can give me your digits and I can hit you up on the two-way. It's whatever, no rush, my guy.

Join the WhenInRome Fan Club!
Shout out to Mr. DeMartino... the first member. Thank you my son! ;)


Re: Arrested in Korea for picture-taking. Any help or advice?
« Reply #76 on: March 24, 2022, 07:34:22 am »
Glad you got a good conclusion and can now relax about it and enjoy life again!
A warning for us all to be careful of what -or who- we take photos of.


  • hangook77
  • Waygook Lord

    • 5044

    • September 14, 2017, 09:10:12 am
    • Near Busan
Re: Arrested in Korea for picture-taking. Any help or advice?
« Reply #77 on: March 31, 2022, 10:39:17 am »
Dude, if a homeowner's association in the U.S. makes a stupid rule I don't say "America is making a mountain out of a mole hill." If Count Dankula goes down I don't say "The UK is making a mountain out of a mole hill."

You do this a lot- Just completely assign an entire country to one position or another. You really should try to use smaller groups than entire countries when assessing things.

As for why the law is the way it is, that's due to past cases where the burden of proof meant that women had a really tough time proving things.

As for feelings, feelings and state of mind have always been A PART of the law,  you know, mens rea. While I agree that there is too much consideration given to the feelings and perception of one party and not enough given to another, to claim that laws aren't based off of feelings is ridiculous. Whether a self-defense claimant felt afraid for their life. Whether the person intended great bodily harm, etc.

My hometown doesn't do homeowner's associations.  We just have municipal bylaws if we live in a city.  But they are usually reasonable.  To be honest the first time I heard of a homeowners association and that municipalities in the States hand off some of their responsibilities to them, I was surprised.  For the land of the free, some folks put up with these organizations some of which are pretty Communist.  I am surprised some more second amendment folks don't kick those yolks off.  But I assume only some States use them and not others.  Some of them are pretty ridiculous and petty with their dumb rules.  You have to plant this type of tree (and not another) in your yard.  No fence, no gazebo, don't do this, don't do that, your house must be a certain color.  Can't fly a flag or have one of a certain size, etc.  Lame.