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  • prime
  • Waygookin

    • 12

    • August 16, 2010, 07:43:41 am
    • pohang
residency certificate
« Reply #240 on: January 30, 2012, 01:02:04 am »
I've been here for two years from America. I'm leaving in March and my co-teacher is telling me to get my residency certificate. What will happen if I don't get it? Will I still be able to get my money (Pension, Flight, Severance)?
« Last Edit: January 30, 2012, 01:31:08 am by prime »


Re: residency certificate
« Reply #241 on: January 30, 2012, 09:22:04 am »
'I've been here for two years from America. I'm leaving in March and my co-teacher is telling me to get my residency certificate. What will happen if I don't get it? Will I still be able to get my money (Pension, Flight, Severance)? '

You maybe able to claim income tax you have already paid in Korea over the past 2 years (I'm not sure though if you have to declare your earnings back in the US though). I'm an Australian and got a residency certificate in August last year. As far as I'm aware I don't have to pay tax for my first 2 years in Korea (or Australia) with a proof of residency certificate (if I stay in my job for that long). In regards to income tax I'd ask your co-teacher (you may need a tax card but I think that's exclusively for the purchase of goods/services, not income tax). The severance and flight claims should be okay but you may need the residency certificate for the pension (but I'm not 100% about this). I hope this helps but please check with your co-teacher/education office etc.


  • Davey
  • Moderator - LVL 3

    • 1820

    • February 01, 2010, 01:36:20 pm
Re: Questions and Answers for American Taxes
« Reply #242 on: February 13, 2012, 02:13:08 pm »
I edited the first post based on what posters wrote here. Hopefully this will reduce the number of redundant posts and make it easier for those seeking American tax info. I'm not American so I'm not completely familiar with the matter so please let me know if any of the info. is incorrect and what else should be added.
« Last Edit: February 13, 2012, 02:19:41 pm by Davey »
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EPIK: VISA, RENEWING, PENSION, ETC:

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  • Jozigirl
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1045

    • May 03, 2011, 07:37:47 am
Claiming tax that has already been deducted
« Reply #243 on: February 16, 2012, 09:38:59 am »
I apologise if this topic has already been covered; I didn't find anything in the Search function though.

I am still struggling to get a Residency Certificate out of my tax office in SA (and have been since I left in 2010).  I have re-applied yet again for this certificate but have been told that it will take approximately 3 weeks to process.  My school needs the certificate by 27 February or I will have to pay the tax settlement.

Does anyone know if it's possible to re-claim the tax settlement if I submit the RC after February 27th?


  • Davey
  • Moderator - LVL 3

    • 1820

    • February 01, 2010, 01:36:20 pm
Re: Claiming tax that has already been deducted
« Reply #244 on: February 16, 2012, 11:10:51 am »
I apologise if this topic has already been covered; I didn't find anything in the Search function though.

I am still struggling to get a Residency Certificate out of my tax office in SA (and have been since I left in 2010).  I have re-applied yet again for this certificate but have been told that it will take approximately 3 weeks to process.  My school needs the certificate by 27 February or I will have to pay the tax settlement.

Does anyone know if it's possible to re-claim the tax settlement if I submit the RC after February 27th?

As stated in the FAQ:

"Yes. Please be aware that the refund won't  get handed back to you in cash--it will most likely come in the form of a tax credit at the end of the financial year.."

From this link:

http://waygook.org/index.php/topic,16586.0.html

"For those that did not get a tax residency certificate prior to leaving for Korea, you still can apply for one from your tax authority.  Submitting it to the Korean NTS will allow you to claim back tax that may have already been paid retroactively.  Please be aware that tax doesn't get handed back to you in a wad of won, it will most likely come in the form of a tax credit at the end of the financial year."

------------------------------------------
Search this site using Google by typing, "site:waygook.org [search term]," especially during peak hours. Alternatively, use the site's search function.

EPIK: VISA, RENEWING, PENSION, ETC:

http://waygook.org/index.php/topic,2614.0.html


Re: Questions and Answers for American Taxes
« Reply #245 on: March 05, 2012, 06:59:39 pm »
I have not received my residency certification in the mail yet (it should be here next week) and my first paycheck is not until the 25th of this month.  As long as i turn it in before I get paid, I shouldnt have to pay the taxes, right? 


Re: No taxes for Americans?
« Reply #246 on: March 13, 2012, 01:45:03 pm »
Hi, all:

So I have my residency certificate. Do I just hand it to my co-teacher? Do I have to send it to the GEPIK office? Back to my recruiter? I've looked and looked, but can't seem to find an answer on this. I just want to make sure I am putting it into the correct hands.

Thanks.
You should talk to your main CO-Teacher.  Last week, my co-teacher asked for my Residency Certificate and so I gave it to her.   If your co-teacher hasn't asked you, let her know or to whom you should give it too.  Do it right away too.  Payday is coming soon and you might be taxed.   So, hopefully that helps you out there =).  GOod luck =).


  • Hoosier_Jedi
  • Expert Waygook

    • 859

    • April 08, 2011, 01:56:38 pm
    • Icheon
    more
US Taxes Questions
« Reply #247 on: March 14, 2012, 01:49:33 pm »
I'm filling out my taxes and have a few questions I was hoping I could get some help with.

* On the 2555, my school paying for my apartment counts as "expenses paid on your behalf for services you performed" right?

* Just what am I supposed to use as a W2 form?

* The the online class I took for my TEFL count as tuition and fees, right?


Man, do I hate filling out my taxes. I'd give a lot for an H&R Block right about now.  :(

Anyway, thanks in advance.


  • mkccp2
  • Explorer

    • 5

    • March 07, 2012, 11:42:07 am
    • Cheongju, South Korea
Re: Questions and Answers for American Taxes
« Reply #248 on: March 20, 2012, 09:38:04 pm »
I'm an American, and I didn't apply for the residency certificate from the IRS. I'm only here for 6 months, taxes aren't high enough to outweigh the cost of the certificate, etc. However, the other day, my mentor teacher asked me about it. Her English is very broken and I don't speak Korean, but she seemed to be implying that there was a way I could still get it. I thought I had to have it in before my first paycheck to have it count, but she wanted me to go through with the process. I have no idea what exactly the process entails, but could anyone offer any insight on this matter?


  • sho
  • Waygookin

    • 13

    • March 05, 2012, 05:51:31 pm
    • Paju
Filling out the 8802
« Reply #249 on: March 21, 2012, 10:27:26 am »
Hi,

When filling out the 8802 (application for the Certificate of Residency), am I filling it out for the year I will be spending in Korea or for a previous year?  Ie. when it asks for my address (number 2), do I put my Korean or American one?  And when it asks for the year I want the certification, do I place the year I'm about to work in Korea or a previous one?

I ask because it's a form to prove residency, so it makes sense that I would stick in my US address and tax info from a previous year (for number 5) when I was actually residing in the States. 

Sorry if this question is obvious or been asked (I found it hard to search for).

SO: If I do fill it out for March 2012-March 2013 (the year I will be working in Korea), Do I write "Yes" for number five (was the applicat required to file a US tax form for the tax periods) and write "other" and say I will be filling out the 2555?

*Also, I have never filed taxes in the US (recent grad, never made enough money).  I'm going to put my Social Security for my taxpayer ID. 


Re: Questions and Answers for American Taxes
« Reply #250 on: April 04, 2012, 08:04:58 am »
Does anyone have experience with efax.com? I used the service to fax my 8802 form because I couldn't find any places in my city that would let me send an international fax. I got a confirmation that the fax was sent successfully but I haven't heard anything from the IRS. Is that normal?
Also, when you get a tax credit back at the end of the year for the Korean taxes that were deducted before you got your tax exemption form in, do you have to fill out paperwork or do anything to get it back or do they just give it to you?

Thanks


Re: Questions and Answers for American Taxes
« Reply #251 on: May 03, 2012, 08:52:38 am »
Obviously Tax Day has already past, butttt I neglected to file yet. I know, i'm an idiot.

This is actually my first time filing taxes on my own without the aid of a parental unit.

I haven't even lived in the US for the last year, so I have no US income.  I never got my residency certificate from the IRS (although I tried my damnedest repeatedly) so I have indeed been getting taxed by the Korean Govt since I got here in Sept 2010.

Just looking for guidance on how exactly I should file?

Thanks.


Re: Questions and Answers for American Taxes
« Reply #252 on: May 11, 2012, 10:40:11 pm »
Obviously Tax Day has already past, butttt I neglected to file yet. I know, i'm an idiot.

This is actually my first time filing taxes on my own without the aid of a parental unit.

I haven't even lived in the US for the last year, so I have no US income.  I never got my residency certificate from the IRS (although I tried my damnedest repeatedly) so I have indeed been getting taxed by the Korean Govt since I got here in Sept 2010.

Just looking for guidance on how exactly I should file?

Thanks.

File a 1040.  Get an foreign income exclusion using form 2555.  This means you don't have to pay taxes on foreign income (up to $90,000 approximately).

Lucky for you, you're not late.  Since you're abroad, you get an automatic 2-month extension (details in the instructions for form 2555).  Just attach a signed letter to your tax return stating this.  No need to apply ahead.

Don't forget to file an FBAR, if you have had over $10,000 total in foreign accounts last year.  This is due June 30th and is seperate from your taxes.
C is for cookie, that's good enough for me.


Reporting Jeonse
« Reply #253 on: May 23, 2012, 12:11:18 pm »
Hi,

I'm filling out my American tax forms.  To my knowledge, we're supposed to report our housing (how much our employer pays for rent).

However, I found out today that my school is doing Jeonse, not Wolse.  Therefore, there is no monthly payment to speak of.  Therefore, how do I report this, if I report it at all?

Thank you.
C is for cookie, that's good enough for me.


  • rcollin1
  • Adventurer

    • 45

    • March 21, 2011, 02:46:25 pm
    • South Korea
Re: Questions and Answers for American Taxes
« Reply #254 on: August 21, 2012, 01:37:06 pm »
I have been paying taxes every month even though I arrived with my tax residency form and gave a copy to my school... should I not have been paying taxes at all? I assumed I got a refund at the end. I'm finishing up my second year here (feb intake) and I'll be going back to the States when it's up.

thanks in advance. (:


  • Davey
  • Moderator - LVL 3

    • 1820

    • February 01, 2010, 01:36:20 pm
Re: Questions and Answers for American Taxes
« Reply #255 on: August 25, 2012, 01:36:47 pm »
I have been paying taxes every month even though I arrived with my tax residency form and gave a copy to my school... should I not have been paying taxes at all? I assumed I got a refund at the end. I'm finishing up my second year here (feb intake) and I'll be going back to the States when it's up.

thanks in advance. (:

But what if I've already started paying Korean taxes, will I get my money back once my school gets 6166?

Yes. If not, contact the tax office directly. 
------------------------------------------
Search this site using Google by typing, "site:waygook.org [search term]," especially during peak hours. Alternatively, use the site's search function.

EPIK: VISA, RENEWING, PENSION, ETC:

http://waygook.org/index.php/topic,2614.0.html


  • tideout
  • Adventurer

    • 33

    • December 25, 2010, 10:13:25 am
    • South Korea
Re: US Residency Certificate for tax exemption in Korea- What do we do with it?
« Reply #256 on: September 04, 2012, 08:03:49 am »
This question is for anyone from California doing their taxes. My income earned in Korea, by federal standards is excluded from taxation. So, my income made here is excluded on my federal taxes. However, that is not the case for my taxes in California. California is taxing all of my income, including my money made here. I owe taxes to California. Is this happening to you? I'm paying taxes in Korea, and according to the U.S. Korea tax treaty, I am not supposed to be double taxed. I'd appreciate your comments.

This is a point that is frequently missed on the Korean boards and almost ignored automatically by many. I had a very long disucssion with the head attorney for the tax dept in my state last year about this subject.

The treaty to ignore taxes abroad, in Korea etc. is strictly a Federal agreement - not a treaty with your State government. In short, it has nothing to do with the decision of your individual state to tax foreign earned income or not. People just assume the Federal treaty trumps of supercedes your States taxation laws.  :o



  • tideout
  • Adventurer

    • 33

    • December 25, 2010, 10:13:25 am
    • South Korea
US Tax qustion - contract over 2 tax years, bonfide residency etc..
« Reply #257 on: September 04, 2012, 08:46:41 am »
I just came back to the States to find a short follow-up form from the IRS on my dates in Korea for 2011.

Here’s the story. I worked in Korea(public school) and finished my contract at the end of February 2011 (60 days). I then took a 6 month break and came back to work another year long contract in which I was paid for September, October, November & December of 2011 (120 days). Clearly, I’m not at or near 330 days with the break in the middle of 2011. I did file the 2555 form (2011 return) thinking the income in Korea would still be way under the 92K income limit.

I continued to work into 2012 on my contract which ended at the end of August.

How screwed am I with 2011 taxes? Can I somehow “extend” my 2011 months by filing for an extension to include my actual 12 month contract that goes into 2012? That would be quite a few months in 2012 but would actually more accurately reflect the contract as well as give me a solid 12 months in Korea.
It seems impossible to believe I’d pay taxes on 6 months of income teaching when someone else making say $80K working 10 months would pay nothing?

Thanks for any help on this – I really appreciate it.


  • MalTX
  • Waygookin

    • 11

    • March 04, 2012, 01:37:08 am
    • Jincheon
Re: Questions and Answers for American Taxes
« Reply #258 on: September 05, 2012, 05:45:29 am »
My apologies if this has been covered, I scrolled through quite a few pages and didn't see that this specific question has been addressed.

I am arriving in Korea on Sept. 26th. When I called the IRS the woman told me that I would need to get a RC now, and again on Dec. 1st. Now that the cost is $85 I feel like it isn't worth it to request the RC until Dec. I would rather just have taxes deducted from my pay for a few months then pay $85 twice. Do you think that this will become an issue with my school and when filing my taxes? Should I turn in the form now or should I just wait until Dec?

I appreciate any advice/suggestions you may have.


  • iamrhart
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1938

    • November 16, 2011, 01:20:16 pm
    • XXXXXXXXxx
Re: Questions and Answers for American Taxes
« Reply #259 on: September 05, 2012, 12:43:16 pm »
Here is a question for you.
What is the ITIN? I saw different information about it. Some say you have to be a Foreigner (to the USA) to apply for one. Others say its the same as your SSN, and still some say that you need to apply for one.

Does anyone know the REAL answer? I would call the IRS, but they never answer me.

Please let me know,
iamrhart@yahoo.com
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