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  • Currymarie
  • Waygookin

    • 11

    • September 02, 2011, 01:54:53 pm
    • South Korea
Re: Questions and Answers for American Taxes
« Reply #220 on: September 02, 2011, 02:44:14 pm »
Yes,
As an American citizen, you should fill out the 1040 and the EZ2555. The 2555 form makes you exempt from paying taxes if your yearly income is less than I believe $100,000. It's a nice way to avoid being charged unnecessary taxes!


  • naturegirl321
  • Expert Waygook

    • 588

    • June 13, 2011, 01:34:50 pm
    • Seoul
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Re: Questions and Answers for American Taxes
« Reply #221 on: September 02, 2011, 04:44:19 pm »
Read the 2555EZ, you might not qualify, especially if you have SE.  It was 91.500 or 91.400 last year. 
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  • naturegirl321
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    • June 13, 2011, 01:34:50 pm
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Re: Questions and Answers for American Taxes
« Reply #222 on: September 08, 2011, 11:01:38 am »
Just read the questions on the top to see if you can file the EZ form or have to do the long form.  If you are NOT PAYING KOREAN TAXES, you MUST FILE THE LONG FORM:
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Re: IRS Form 6166 (USA)
« Reply #223 on: October 04, 2011, 08:24:34 am »
5. If you've already started paying Korean taxes, you'll continue to do so until your school receives the 6166.  However, you will receive the money back at the end, so try not to stress about it.

I have been in Korea for a month and have yet to get my 6166 sent to my parents in the states. I gave my coteacher the first letter (the one that says I will be processed within 30 days) - will this help? I think she is confused.

What does the school do with the 6166 once they get it? File it to my GEPIK  coordinator? How do I make sure to get my taxes back?


  • naturegirl321
  • Expert Waygook

    • 588

    • June 13, 2011, 01:34:50 pm
    • Seoul
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Re: Questions and Answers for American Taxes
« Reply #224 on: October 04, 2011, 10:28:33 am »
They file it and will give you your taxes back. If they don't, then you could always go to the tax office and ask why.
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  • naturegirl321
  • Expert Waygook

    • 588

    • June 13, 2011, 01:34:50 pm
    • Seoul
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Re: Questions and Answers for American Taxes
« Reply #225 on: October 04, 2011, 03:23:04 pm »
Yes, they take it, but they'll give it back. They took taxes from me for 3 months then gave them back.  I'm not sure about the application. Maybe that's something your school will giv eyou?

[/quote]
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Re: Questions and Answers for American Taxes
« Reply #226 on: October 06, 2011, 12:57:06 pm »
Question about the American certificate of residence form:

I was in Korea last year and PAID Korean taxes (but received a refund) and did my American taxes when I got home. My hagwon and recruiter both didn't know/tell me about taxes and I didn't do enough research to realize I had to do the IRS form.

This is my second year at public school and I'm starting the IRS form. However, is the 80 the ONLY form we can use to establish residence? Because I paid taxes last year, are there any other special circumstances for my case?

Anyone with a similar situation?

Thank you
I felt sorry for myself because I had no shoes-- until I met a man with no feet.


  • naturegirl321
  • Expert Waygook

    • 588

    • June 13, 2011, 01:34:50 pm
    • Seoul
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Re: Questions and Answers for American Taxes
« Reply #227 on: October 06, 2011, 01:50:12 pm »
IN order to get the form, you have to pay American taxes. So I lived in peru, but paid taxes to the US and got a residency cert. You could try, but unless you paid the majority to the US, I'm not sure if it would work.

You got all your Korean taxes back, right?

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Re: Questions and Answers for American Taxes
« Reply #228 on: October 11, 2011, 07:59:30 am »
So I got the first letter from the IRS saying they are processing my request. Now they have sent another letter to my parents house in the states stating this

"We regret that we are unable to process your request without addtional information

WE NEED THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION FROM YOU

All Applicants requesting a current year US Residency Certification must provide a statement signed under penalty of perjury that, for the purposes of taxation, they are US residents, and will remain so throughout the current taxable year. "

Did anyone ever get something like this? My parents are going to call the IRS to ask what this is about - but just wondering if anyone else has had this issue.


  • Slowpoke
  • Explorer

    • 7

    • October 10, 2011, 01:02:22 pm
    • South Korea
Re: Questions and Answers for American Taxes
« Reply #229 on: October 11, 2011, 02:07:05 pm »
stamerjam, it's a written statement that you just type on the form.

http://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/f8802.pdf  Here is the form, 8802 Application for US Residency Certification

You MUST complete section 10 and it must be done correctly.  For information on what you must type, see form 8802-I: http://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/i8802.pdf

See Line 10 and Table 2 on page 10 of the instructions form.  You need to type that in section 10 on the 8802 form.  If you've turned in the form without the perjury statement, maybe you can have your parents call the IRS to see if the statement can be turned in separately. 


  • Chuckthebear
  • Veteran

    • 123

    • October 18, 2010, 12:27:15 pm
    • Dongducheon South Korea
Delayed taxing?
« Reply #230 on: October 13, 2011, 09:58:58 am »
I'm about to finish up my contract.  I know since i'm a US citizen that there are somethings to do that will keep us exempt from having the korean government take out taxes. 

For the duration of my contract so far i haven't had the deductions from my monthly paychecks.  Now however, when my contract is about to be up (in less than a week) i'm told that they will be retroactively taking out taxes and that i need to provide the certifcate of residency, or proof of residency, from the IRS.  After doing some looking around it seems getting this will take a few months.  I'm at a loss of what to do about this situation.  Any advice would be greatly appreciated.


  • Andrea.ESL
  • Adventurer

    • 53

    • December 23, 2010, 05:35:41 pm
    • South Korea
1040 and 2555 US Tax Forms - Please help
« Reply #231 on: November 29, 2011, 01:02:16 pm »
First off, let me just say filing paperwork is a nightmare.  The wording on these forms is mind-numbing.

I'm looking for help in figuring out how this works, and if my logic is sound.

For reference, here are the links to the two tax forms (for 2011, but are the same or similar for previous years)

http://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/f1040.pdf
http://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/f2555.pdf

Let's first look at the 1040 Tax Form, Line 7:

Quote
Wages, salaries, tips, etc. Attach Form(s) W-2

It's confusing here whether they want you to only include your income earned in the United States (which for me would be none), or income earned elsewhere.  Let's continue.

Also on the 1040 Tax Form is Line 21:

Quote
Other income. List type and amount

Now I reference this line because of a note listed on the 2555 Tax Form, on line 45:

Quote
Subtract line 44 from line 43. Enter the result here and in parentheses on Form 1040, line 21.
Next to the amount enter “Form 2555.” On Form 1040, subtract this amount from your income
to arrive at total income on Form 1040, line 22

Tax Form 2555 Line 44:

Quote
Deductions allowed in figuring your adjusted gross income (Form 1040, line 37) that are allocable
to the excluded income. See instructions and attach computation

So it wants me to use an amount listed on line 37 of the 1040 to calculate something to list on line 44, which I use to calculate line 45 which is written again on line 21 (1040 Tax form) which is something I need to calculate line 37 on the 1040?  AGGHHH!  That shouldn't be possible, right?  It sounds like a circular loop that can't be done.  Here's how I see it:

1040 Line 21 = 2555 Line 45
2555 Line 45 = 2555 Line 44 - 2555 Line 43
2555 Line 44 = 1040 Line 37
1040 Line 37 = 1040 Line 36 - 1040 Line 22
1040 Line 22 = 1040 Lines 7 through 21

Does anyone see any sense to this?

I really hope someone can shed some light, because I really don't want to have to call the IRS and have them give me seven different wrong answers.


Re: 1040 and 2555 US Tax Forms - Please help
« Reply #232 on: November 29, 2011, 04:26:37 pm »
First off, let me just say filing paperwork is a nightmare.  The wording on these forms is mind-numbing.

I'm looking for help in figuring out how this works, and if my logic is sound.

For reference, here are the links to the two tax forms (for 2011, but are the same or similar for previous years)

http://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/f1040.pdf
http://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/f2555.pdf

Let's first look at the 1040 Tax Form, Line 7:

Quote
Wages, salaries, tips, etc. Attach Form(s) W-2

It's confusing here whether they want you to only include your income earned in the United States (which for me would be none), or income earned elsewhere.  Let's continue.

Also on the 1040 Tax Form is Line 21:

Quote
Other income. List type and amount

Now I reference this line because of a note listed on the 2555 Tax Form, on line 45:

Quote
Subtract line 44 from line 43. Enter the result here and in parentheses on Form 1040, line 21.
Next to the amount enter “Form 2555.” On Form 1040, subtract this amount from your income
to arrive at total income on Form 1040, line 22

Tax Form 2555 Line 44:

Quote
Deductions allowed in figuring your adjusted gross income (Form 1040, line 37) that are allocable
to the excluded income. See instructions and attach computation

So it wants me to use an amount listed on line 37 of the 1040 to calculate something to list on line 44, which I use to calculate line 45 which is written again on line 21 (1040 Tax form) which is something I need to calculate line 37 on the 1040?  AGGHHH!  That shouldn't be possible, right?  It sounds like a circular loop that can't be done.  Here's how I see it:

1040 Line 21 = 2555 Line 45
2555 Line 45 = 2555 Line 44 - 2555 Line 43
2555 Line 44 = 1040 Line 37
1040 Line 37 = 1040 Line 36 - 1040 Line 22
1040 Line 22 = 1040 Lines 7 through 21

Does anyone see any sense to this?

I really hope someone can shed some light, because I really don't want to have to call the IRS and have them give me seven different wrong answers.

Wages, salaries, tips, etc.  includes foreign and domestic.  If they meant domestic, they would have specified (these are painstakingly written).  The instruction manual states, "Enter the total of your wages, salaries, tipc, etc.". I had no issues filling out these forms the past 2 years.  Just be careful.
C is for cookie, that's good enough for me.


Re: Questions and Answers for American Taxes
« Reply #233 on: December 08, 2011, 09:04:05 pm »
Is it too late to try to be tax exempt for this year?  I haven't filled out the paperwork yet.

But I am American, & I started teaching this past August.


Does anyone know if it's too late for me to even bother filling out these forms? 


  • naturegirl321
  • Expert Waygook

    • 588

    • June 13, 2011, 01:34:50 pm
    • Seoul
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Re: Questions and Answers for American Taxes
« Reply #234 on: December 14, 2011, 09:59:35 am »
YOu give the docs to your school, then your school gives you the money back and this extempts you from paying future taxes as well, up to two years.  If you leave, I'm not sure if you get another two years or not.

As to this "All Applicants requesting a current year US Residency Certification must provide a statement signed under penalty of perjury that, for the purposes of taxation, they are US residents, and will remain so throughout the current taxable year. "

It's for tax purposes, so if you're a US tax resident than you're ok. That's my interpretation and I got the form. I filed the 2555 for the prior year, but paid US taxes. My thinking is that these people do this for a living. I gave them all the paperwork and they have to interpret it. If their interpretation is that I'm a US tax resident, then they should give me the form.

1040 line 7, ALL income
1040 line 21, income from 2555 SUBTRACT THIS ( so if on line 7 you made 25K while in Korea, then on line 21 you enter this money in (25,000) so your total on line whatever would be 0, meaning you owe nothing to the US.
2555, line 44 chances are you have no deductions

I get worked about about taxes as well, my father says there's no need. We're poor English teachers making nowhere NEAR the 91K plus limit. If the IRS really wants to audit us, they can have at it, there are bigger fish to fry than English teachers in Korea.

I never purposely screw the IRS over, I've made mistakes, yes, like writing my SSN down wrong, but simple mistakes like that, they understand, flipping numbers and such. No matter how you put it, I've never made over the limit.

AND, you should always file. Backfiling is going to be hard. You don't need W2s if you work overseas, just save your paystubs if you have them. Or your bank book which should show deposits. They'll take your word for it. They should know that TEFL teachers in Korea arne't making heaps of cash. It's not like we're laundering money or antying.

As for tax accountants, I plan on using greenbacktaxservice s.com a friend recommended them to me. My taxes this year are a nightmare though (I've got income from three different continents, closed my IRAs, had a baby, etc) , I'll gladly pay someone 300 bucks and then base all my future taxes off that.

stacykristina, hopefully not. It's retroactive for two years.
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IRS email?
« Reply #235 on: December 20, 2011, 06:42:29 am »
I submitted my Form 8802 in mid-September (mailed it from Korea). I noticed the IRS deposited my $35 check one month later. Now, it's late December and still no word/update/progress as far as I can tell. I'd like to contact them to make sure everything is ok.

I checked the IRS website but, can you believe it, there's NO email address provided for questions/inquiries! Only telephone numbers. Well, I'm in Korea. I'm not gonna pay to call the US.

Anyone know how to contact the IRS for free?

BTW, my school said that because the form is missing, I will likely have to pay 200-300,000KW for taxes this year. Not too bad, but still, would like to have that paperwork...


  • EllaRing
  • Adventurer

    • 44

    • August 29, 2011, 07:35:55 am
    • Daegu
Re: Korean tax
« Reply #236 on: January 16, 2012, 08:00:08 am »
Gabi, you should definitely turn in the paperwork to be exempt. The tax rate in Korea is NOT 3%. It simply appears to be quite low (there's a thread about this somewhere on here...if I find it, I'll post it.). However, even if you choose to pay Korean taxes, you'll still have to file tax forms in the US, especially if you've worked there within the last tax year. I've seen a few articles lately about how the US is cracking down on expats who haven't been filing taxes on foreign earned income. And even though our foreign earned income isn't taxed (for those earning less than $92,000), they want the information on file anyway. Big brother at work...


  • moksori
  • Adventurer

    • 32

    • July 03, 2011, 11:22:33 pm
    • soon to be Seoul
Re: Korean tax
« Reply #237 on: January 16, 2012, 08:38:34 am »
Sorry about the thread hi-jacking, but am I exempted from paying tax if I'm a dual citizen of both the US and Korea?


  • EllaRing
  • Adventurer

    • 44

    • August 29, 2011, 07:35:55 am
    • Daegu
Re: Korean tax
« Reply #238 on: January 16, 2012, 10:29:56 am »
Moksori, unfortunately, you're never exempted from filing and/or paying taxes if you are a US citizens. You always have to file taxes on your foreign earned income and you if you owe, you pay. This works for anyone who has US citizenship, even if they are dual citizens. I and several of my family members have dual citizenship and even though only a few of us worked and lived in the US in 2011, we all still have to file taxes. Here's an article that sums things up http://www.theglobeandmail.com/globe-investor/personal-finance/us-tax-crackdown-hits-canadian-residents/article2067393/. Hope this helps.


  • EllaRing
  • Adventurer

    • 44

    • August 29, 2011, 07:35:55 am
    • Daegu
Re: Korean tax
« Reply #239 on: January 16, 2012, 02:25:12 pm »
Hey Moksori, sorry! Yeah you should be eligible as a dual citizen, but I'm not totally sure. There are a large number of people in Korea who are on various visas that might be able to answer your question. But since taxes tend to be a bit different for everyone, I'd suggest giving the IRS a call.