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  • kate.d
  • Veteran

    • 84

    • May 10, 2010, 07:57:50 am
    • South Korea
Re: No taxes for Americans?
« Reply #20 on: December 17, 2010, 02:15:57 pm »
When we got to Korea, my husband and I gave them that paper, they looked at it, asked around (I guess) and said they couldn't do anything about it.  We have been having taxes taken out for 10 months.  Is there any way we can get this to stop? Any advice? We are at public schools.


Re: No taxes for Americans?
« Reply #21 on: December 17, 2010, 02:24:10 pm »
I am wondering for more clarification.

I am in SMOE. If you get the residency certificate, then you get your korean taxes exempt and given back to you. What about US taxes? Do you have to pay them? Whats the procedure?

I have been here for 1.5 years. It would be a nice chunk of change to get the taxes back. But I didnt do it because I thought you would have to report to US taxes. A big headache and cost more money down the line. Why pay close to 30% when you are paying 3% in korea?

Any enlightenment? and how easy is it to get the residency cert if you are in Korea? With no one to get anything done in the States?


  • divine
  • Adventurer

    • 59

    • November 19, 2010, 04:55:53 pm
    • Geumsung, Gyeonsanbukdo
Whose responsibility is it to get the Residency Certification
« Reply #22 on: December 21, 2010, 12:17:39 pm »
Hi! The Office Manager and the teacher are threatening to begin taking taxes from my pay, because they have not received the Residency Certificate.
When I applied for this job, I was not told that I need to have the residency certificate. I wrote a letter to the IRS and they said I have to fill out form 8802 and submit a $35.00 fee for processing. Anyone knows what's the fastest way to get the RC ? Is this my responsibility, or the teacher?

Thanks
Divine


Re: Whose responsibility is it to get the Residency Certification
« Reply #23 on: December 21, 2010, 12:21:04 pm »
That's your responsibility. You have to fill out the form and send it to IRS, and they will send the residency certificate(s) to you. You can request up to 20 copies, from my memory.
I had them send it to my home in the States, and had my sister Fedex it to me.
But maybe they can send it to you directly, to Korea.
 


  • sheedi
  • Veteran

    • 125

    • March 17, 2010, 04:13:11 pm
    • Incheon, South Korea
Re: Whose responsibility is it to get the Residency Certification
« Reply #24 on: December 21, 2010, 12:28:50 pm »
Yep your responsible. Mine took about 2 months as well and my mom shipped it to me. It says it takes 35, or 40 days, but then my mom got a letter saying that it will take a bit longer.


Re: Whose responsibility is it to get the Residency Certification
« Reply #25 on: December 21, 2010, 12:31:54 pm »
Make sure you call about a month after you apply for it.  They will be able to tell you the status.  When I called they said it was set to be printed on Saturday and mailed on Monday.


  • emwsu
  • Veteran

    • 208

    • November 28, 2010, 09:19:06 pm
    • South Korea
Re: Tax Exemption Information for Americans: Residency Certificate
« Reply #26 on: December 21, 2010, 12:52:40 pm »
I mailed it in, I don't think you can email it. My first copy got lost in the mail somewhere, so I had them resend one to my parent's house in the states. My dad scaned and emailed it to me, I printed that off and so far my school is happy with that.


  • sheila
  • Moderator - LVL 2

    • 1480

    • November 23, 2009, 08:32:58 am
    • Gangnamgu, Seoul
Re: Tax Exemption Information for Americans: Residency Certificate
« Reply #27 on: December 21, 2010, 01:05:56 pm »
Here is the IRS website regarding this http://www.irs.gov/instructions/i8802/ch01.html as well as the e-pay website http://www.irs.gov/efile/article/0,,id=97400,00.html if you're concerned about getting a money order.  This made things go much faster for me. Good luck with your forms.
Hard work beats talent when talent doesn't work hard!
www.freerice.com


  • carlita
  • Veteran

    • 92

    • September 16, 2010, 08:38:11 am
    • seoul
Re: Tax Exemption Information for Americans: Residency Certificate
« Reply #28 on: January 18, 2011, 07:19:40 am »
I am filling out the 8802 form.  What is the U.S. taxpayer identification number (TIN) - I am not sure where to find it - is it your social security number.

Also, if I just pay Korean taxes, can I get/apply for a tax refund at the end of the tax year here in Korea?????

Thanks :)


Re: Tax Exemption Information for Americans: Residency Certificate
« Reply #29 on: January 18, 2011, 07:45:05 am »
TIN is your Social Security number.


  • ewkbruin
  • Waygookin

    • 21

    • July 06, 2010, 09:40:03 am
    • Korea
US Residency Certificate for tax exemption in Korea- What do we do with it?
« Reply #30 on: January 24, 2011, 08:41:17 pm »
This question is for anyone from California doing their taxes. My income earned in Korea, by federal standards is excluded from taxation. So, my income made here is excluded on my federal taxes. However, that is not the case for my taxes in California. California is taxing all of my income, including my money made here. I owe taxes to California. Is this happening to you? I'm paying taxes in Korea, and according to the U.S. Korea tax treaty, I am not supposed to be double taxed. I'd appreciate your comments.
« Last Edit: January 24, 2011, 08:46:50 pm by ewkbruin »


Re: CALIFORNIA TAXES Question
« Reply #31 on: January 24, 2011, 10:20:40 pm »
Wow that sucks. I'm doing mine right now...for Michigan income taxes they just have you carry over your AGI from the federal 1040, which already has foreign income excluded. But it looks like California uses the amounts directly off of your W-2s. Unfortunately the relief from double taxation only applies to the federal government...


  • carlita
  • Veteran

    • 92

    • September 16, 2010, 08:38:11 am
    • seoul
Re: Tax Exemption Information for Americans: Residency Certificate
« Reply #32 on: January 25, 2011, 06:43:52 pm »
thank you for the TIN number info... :)


  • ewkbruin
  • Waygookin

    • 21

    • July 06, 2010, 09:40:03 am
    • Korea
Re: CALIFORNIA TAXES Question
« Reply #33 on: January 25, 2011, 08:32:44 pm »
Originally, when my Korean income was not reported, California was owing me about 300 bucks, since I had made some money back in Cali before coming here. AFTER, I inputted the amount I made here, California wants about 900 bucks from me!

Seriously, no Californians out there? All accounting forums say California will take the tax from your foreign earned income. But there is got to be someone with a better answer to my problem... Please let me know.


Re: CALIFORNIA TAXES Question
« Reply #34 on: January 25, 2011, 09:09:18 pm »
I would assume if you are not a resident of California (living in Korea) and you are not earning money there, you should have no liability at all.  If you were working this tax year in California you would only need to pay taxes on that income.


  • Scott2hotty
  • Adventurer

    • 29

    • December 07, 2010, 01:04:37 pm
    • Busan, South Korea
Paying taxes to the good ol' US of A
« Reply #35 on: February 07, 2011, 03:24:18 pm »
Okay, so I am American here and I need to pay my taxes. Mind you, I have completed the steps for 'Double-taxation Exemption'.

I asked my school administration to print out of summary of my monthly payments for the year of 2010.

I am told this information is sufficient enough to fill out the tax form for this year.

Can anyone tell me if this is right or not, or what I need to do further?

Any help is greatly appreciated! Thanks :))


  • hahoffmann
  • Explorer

    • 7

    • August 30, 2010, 02:36:05 pm
    • Busan, South Korea
Re: Paying taxes to the good ol' US of A
« Reply #36 on: February 08, 2011, 12:15:29 am »
turbo tax has a free efile thing with steps :).  check it out.


  • drkhv7
  • Adventurer

    • 57

    • June 29, 2009, 10:43:39 am
    • Hampyeong, Jeollanam-Do`
Re: Questions and Answers for American Taxes
« Reply #37 on: February 08, 2011, 12:32:25 pm »
JGlide, it appears that 1040A is a simplified 1040 and 1040 EZ is super simple version of 1040.  There are filing restrictions and deduction restrictions.  I'll paste the wikipedia link and paste below:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IRS_tax_forms#1040A


1040A

The 1040A ("short form") is a shorter version of the Form 1040 U.S. individual income tax return. Use of Form 1040A is limited to taxpayers with taxable income below $100,000 who take the standard deduction instead of itemizing deductions.

A taxpayer who uses the 1040A tax return can only have income from the following sources:

    * Wages, salaries, and tips.
    * Interest and ordinary dividends.
    * Capital gains distributions.
    * Taxable scholarships and fellowship grants.
    * Pensions, annuities, and IRAs.
    * Unemployment compensation.
    * Taxable social security and railroad retirement benefits.
    * Alaska Permanent Fund dividends.

[edit] 1040EZ
1040EZ from 2005

The Form 1040EZ ("easy form"), Income Tax Return for Single and Joint Filers With No Dependents, is a simplified, six-section Federal income tax return, issued by the United States' Internal Revenue Service. Its use is limited to taxpayers with taxable income below $100,000 (as of tax year 2011[update]) who take the standard deduction instead of itemizing deductions.

Other restrictions include:

    * Filing status must be single or married filing jointly.
    * Filer must be under age 65 and not blind at the end of the tax year.
    * Filers must not claim any dependents (other than themselves).
    * No adjustments to income can be claimed.
    * The only credit that can be claimed is the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC).
    * The only income to report for the tax year consisted of wages, salaries, tips, taxable scholarship or fellowship grants, unemployment compensation, or Alaska Permanent Fund dividends, and filer's taxable interest was not over $1,500. But if the filer earned tips, including allocated tips, that are not included in box 5 and box 7 of your Form W-2, filer may not be able to use Form 1040EZ.
    * Filer did not receive any advanced EIC payments.

Form 1040EZ was introduced by the Internal Revenue Service for the 1982 tax year. The title of the 1982 form was "Income Tax Return for Single filers with no dependents."


  • jejusiii
  • Adventurer

    • 26

    • October 14, 2010, 12:30:48 pm
    • south korea
Re: Tax Exemption Information for Americans: Residency Certificate
« Reply #38 on: February 08, 2011, 07:24:23 pm »
Has anyone been denied this before?  After sending the fine folks at the IRS my 8802 (along with my $35) and waiting for several months they sent me a letter saying...

"We regret to inform you that we were unable to process your request without additional information"

I filled out everything I had to on the form.  I remember checking it over several times thinking of how inconvenient it would be if I forgot something.

No where on the letter they sent does it specify what "information" they need from me.  There is no telephone/fax number nor website/email address written on the letter to inquire about this.

Any recommendations as to where I should go from here?  Send in another 8802?  By the time I would even get my residency certificate back (assuming it meets their standards... still have no idea what I did wrong on the 1st one) it's going to be May/June-ish.  I get done working in October.  Is it even worth it at this point?

At the end they thanked me for "my cooperation".  No problem guys.


  • eveliens
  • Super Waygook

    • 352

    • November 05, 2010, 08:49:25 am
    • Seoul, Korea
Re: Tax Exemption Information for Americans: Residency Certificate
« Reply #39 on: February 08, 2011, 07:37:49 pm »
Has anyone been denied this before?  After sending the fine folks at the IRS my 8802 (along with my $35) and waiting for several months they sent me a letter saying...

"We regret to inform you that we were unable to process your request without additional information"

I filled out everything I had to on the form.  I remember checking it over several times thinking of how inconvenient it would be if I forgot something.

No where on the letter they sent does it specify what "information" they need from me.  There is no telephone/fax number nor website/email address written on the letter to inquire about this.

Any recommendations as to where I should go from here?  Send in another 8802?  By the time I would even get my residency certificate back (assuming it meets their standards... still have no idea what I did wrong on the 1st one) it's going to be May/June-ish.  I get done working in October.  Is it even worth it at this point?

At the end they thanked me for "my cooperation".  No problem guys.

They did the same things to me. Did you designate someone in the States to take care of things on your behalf? I had to have my Mom call their office and get things sorted out. Basically, they want a statement that you lived in the States and paid taxes for the last two years or something to that effect if your "additional information" is the same as mine!

This was the number my Mom called (267) 941-1000

Good luck.