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  • bhogj
  • Adventurer

    • 35

    • March 01, 2011, 06:27:16 pm
    • Busan
Re: Is it too late to apply for Residency Certificate?
« Reply #100 on: March 22, 2011, 11:39:13 am »
If you do apply for US Reg, be sure to call them around the time they are SUPPOSED to have it done. Chances are, especially with tax season, it'll take them far longer than the websites state. However, I had luck when calling them on a bi-weekly basis. After three calls, someone was assigned to my documents. If you don't do anything about it, it'll probably just get lost in the shuffle. My friend applied and called around the time he was supposed to receive it, only to find out that they "had no record of his application." Call and verify often.


  • jejusiii
  • Adventurer

    • 26

    • October 14, 2010, 12:30:48 pm
    • south korea
Re: Tax Exemption Information for Americans: Residency Certificate
« Reply #101 on: March 25, 2011, 12:08:54 pm »
OK, so it's been about 5 months since I've started this process and I'm still waiting on my residency certificate (long story).  talked to them today, and it seems as though I'll get it in the mail in about a month. 

I am getting income taxes taken out of my paycheck right now (as I am still waiting on the residency cert)... does anyone have any experience in getting that income tax back?  Is this even possible?

I was told by the people in the office that I could not get it back (their English is limited... they might not have understood me), but someone on this thread stated earlier that you can.  Just curious if any one else has dealt with this.


  • dinomite385
  • Waygookin

    • 13

    • October 12, 2010, 10:06:04 am
    • Ansan, South Korea
Re: Questions and Answers for American Taxes
« Reply #102 on: March 27, 2011, 09:20:16 pm »
I arrived in Korea in the end of August after working in the US until then.  From my understanding I need to file for an extension (form 2350) in order to qualify for the physical presence test on form 2555.  Then, when the time for my extension comes up, I need to send in both forms 1040 and 2555.  Is this correct?  Also, does anyone know if extension requests are ever denied in these situations?  Any help would be appreciated!


Re: Questions and Answers for American Taxes
« Reply #103 on: March 28, 2011, 08:16:40 am »
I arrived in Korea in the end of August after working in the US until then.  From my understanding I need to file for an extension (form 2350) in order to qualify for the physical presence test on form 2555.  Then, when the time for my extension comes up, I need to send in both forms 1040 and 2555.  Is this correct?  Also, does anyone know if extension requests are ever denied in these situations?  Any help would be appreciated!

You are correct. I have never heard of the extension being denied, but I've no real knowledge of that. I don't see that the IRS would have any incentive to deny it.


  • dinomite385
  • Waygookin

    • 13

    • October 12, 2010, 10:06:04 am
    • Ansan, South Korea
Re: Questions and Answers for American Taxes
« Reply #104 on: March 28, 2011, 08:35:46 am »
Thanks for the help, Sam Teacher.  I also just wanted to add, in case anyone else hasn't filed for the extension yet and is in a similar situation to me, that if you are out of the country you actually have two extra months to getthe extension form 2350 in. 

I found some helpful information on the instructions today:
However, if you have 2 extra months to file your return because you were “out of the
country” (defined next), file Form 2350 on or before June 15, 2011. You
should file Form 2350 early enough so that if it is not approved, you can
still file your return on time.
“Out of the country” means that on the regular due date of your
return, either (a) you live outside the United States and Puerto Rico and
your main place of work is outside the United States and Puerto Rico, or
(b) you are in military or naval service outside the United States and
Puerto Rico. If you qualify as being “out of the country,” you will still be
eligible for the extension, even if you are physically present in the United
States or Puerto Rico on the regular due date of the return. You do not
have to file a form to get the 2-month extension because you were out
of the country. But you will have to attach a statement to your tax return
explaining how you qualified.


Re: Questions and Answers for American Taxes
« Reply #105 on: March 28, 2011, 10:26:00 am »
Hello all!

OMG... this is going to make you guys kill me!

Okay, I know I need to do a Form 2555EZ form for Foreign Earned Income Exclusion and Form 8802 for Certificate of Residency to be Korean Tax Exempt (yes, I'm a public school teacher).

Here is the problem...

I haven't filed my taxes since 2008.  :( :o
I have my W2 form from my old job before coming to Korea.
Do I need a different form for Foreign Earned Income Exclusion for 2009 and 2010?
Do I need to do a 1040 form for my 2008 US job?


U.S. Taxes
« Reply #106 on: April 01, 2011, 12:32:08 pm »
Hello All,

         I'm exempted from paying Korean taxes, but still owe U.S. taxes and was wondering
if there were any businesses like H& R Block or Jackson Hewitt here in Korea?   Thank you in advance for the advice. ;)


  • miriamluv
  • Adventurer

    • 31

    • May 27, 2010, 02:01:20 pm
    • Seoul, South Korea
Re: U.S. Taxes
« Reply #107 on: April 01, 2011, 12:58:57 pm »
Yeah, you have to either pay U.S. taxes or Korean.  I just paid Korean, and then filed U.S. taxes online . . . it was pretty easy.  I used either turbo tax or H & R block, I can't remember.  Anyways, you do have to pay and mail it in because you are international.


  • kyletr05
  • Adventurer

    • 34

    • March 09, 2011, 01:08:37 pm
    • Gangwon-do
Re: U.S. Taxes
« Reply #108 on: April 01, 2011, 01:00:21 pm »
When I asked my CPA about it, I was told that if I stay outside the country more than 330 days out of the year (can't remember the exact #) that I don't have to pay American taxes either...


  • bethannv
  • Newgookin

    • 2

    • April 07, 2010, 12:25:14 pm
    • KOrea
Re: U.S. Taxes
« Reply #109 on: April 01, 2011, 01:03:33 pm »
hey, everyone. even if you dont pay american txes, you still need to claim foreign income earned, on a 2555 form.
i did the 2555 ez form, it takes about 5 minutes.


  • scottdk
  • Veteran

    • 157

    • October 04, 2010, 12:30:13 pm
Re: U.S. Taxes
« Reply #110 on: April 01, 2011, 01:07:18 pm »
By filling out an 8802 you (US citizen) can avoid paying taxes in Korea.  From what I understand this is a request form to receive an official Resident Certificate showing you are US resident, thus not having to pay Korean tax.  As my cpa explained to me, if you are living outside the country for so many days and your earnings do not exceed X amount of dollars (i'd say all teachers aren't even near that X amount, can't remember it off the top of my head) for the year, you do not pay US taxes. 


  • Choman10
  • Waygookin

    • 13

    • November 04, 2010, 12:44:51 pm
    • South Korea
Taxes
« Reply #111 on: April 07, 2011, 11:53:06 am »
So I'm filling out my taxes and luckily my current teaching job doesn't count toward this tax season.  But I'm wondering what to do next time.  Usually I just use Turbo Tax online, but what specifically should I be looking out for when it comes to a US citizen teaching in Korea?


  • goodgollymiss
  • Waygookin

    • 16

    • November 29, 2010, 12:31:57 pm
    • Yong-in, Gyeonggi-Do, South Korea
Re: Is it too late to apply for Residency Certificate?
« Reply #112 on: April 07, 2011, 12:48:58 pm »
I requested this form from the IRS a full month before my departure last September (within the 30 day guarantee of my receiving the form;) it is now April and I still haven't received anything.

I'm just hoping this doesn't have too huge an impact. It'd be frustrating to know I was flushing money down the drain because the IRS is majorly inefficient.


  • scottdk
  • Veteran

    • 157

    • October 04, 2010, 12:30:13 pm
Re: Is it too late to apply for Residency Certificate?
« Reply #113 on: April 07, 2011, 01:01:20 pm »
I had filled out and turned in my 8802 last September.  I finally got a letter saying they had received it this February and that within 30day I should have my RC.  I have contacted the IRS earlier this week and apparently they are WAY behind; there are some 50,000 be processed.  At least they have record of my form, but all they told me was to file again with my taxes... felt like they were saying you're &$#* out of luck but file anyway.  Hopefully when I do (or IF I do) receive it I can be refunded the taxes I will end up paying.


  • hmhlee
  • Explorer

    • 8

    • September 27, 2010, 02:23:50 pm
    • Daegu, South Korea
Re: Is it too late to apply for Residency Certificate?
« Reply #114 on: April 07, 2011, 01:13:12 pm »
But I can still go through the process? My Admin staff just told me that the taxes have already been done for this year and it's "impossible" to bother to try.

I was told the same thing by my school as well as my district education office.  Then at an administrative meeting yesterday, we were told to contact Korea's tax office to figure things out. 
Here's their website:  http://www.nts.go.kr/eng/.  Good luck!


Re: Is it too late to apply for Residency Certificate?
« Reply #115 on: April 07, 2011, 01:16:17 pm »
It might be different from school to school, but I just started teaching and I am waiting for the US government to send me my residency certificate. I am fairly sure the school is taking out taxes, but I was assured that once I have the certificate, the school will give me the taxes back. Though to be honest, it really isn't that much money so it is almost worth it to pay taxes here instead of the States. I already applied for the certificate so I am going to complete the process rather than risk a giant mess.


  • katrine
  • Adventurer

    • 55

    • October 01, 2010, 06:13:42 am
    • Gwangju
Re: Is it too late to apply for Residency Certificate?
« Reply #116 on: April 07, 2011, 01:20:16 pm »
I just found out yesterday that my local tax office has lost my residency certificate, and I have to get it again. It took me five months last year to get it back from the IRS, but the office of education says it's no problem to get the all the taxes back as long as there is at least two months before I leave Korea.

hmlee, the impossible is just a lazy lie. You can get it all back. I do know it's more difficult, but for me, getting back the taxes for the past year is about 500k. Well worth pressuring them to go through the effort.
« Last Edit: April 07, 2011, 01:21:50 pm by katrine »


  • scbouy
  • Explorer

    • 7

    • March 03, 2011, 01:36:51 pm
    • Seoul
Re: Is it too late to apply for Residency Certificate?
« Reply #117 on: April 07, 2011, 03:10:17 pm »
My school is actually making me do this and I don't really want to. I'm unsure if I will be taxed in the US but I would rather be taxed in Korea since it is lower.


  • verbalist
  • Adventurer

    • 35

    • December 22, 2010, 03:15:05 pm
    • South Korea
Re: Is it too late to apply for Residency Certificate?
« Reply #118 on: April 07, 2011, 03:15:34 pm »
I don't know if it is too late, but why would you want to pay US taxes?  They are much higher than the taxes that you would pay here. 
Those who visit foreign nations, but associate with only there own countrymen, change their climate, but not their customs.  They see new meridians, but the same men; and with heads as empty as their pockets, return with traveled bodies, but with untraveled minds.  
~Charles Caleb Colton, Lancon


  • alfredmaul
  • Waygookin

    • 13

    • February 22, 2011, 11:20:55 pm
    • Daegu, South Korea
Re: Is it too late to apply for Residency Certificate?
« Reply #119 on: April 07, 2011, 03:20:09 pm »
1)  The residency certificate is RETROACTIVE, even past the school year if you're tenacious enough and have someone in Korea pushing for you.

2)  Being exempt from taxes in Korea is NOT mutually exclusive with being exempt from taxes in the U.S.  For up to two years you do not have to pay taxes to either country.  There are stipulations but research them yourself, form 2555ez, etc.

3)  DYDD.