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  • Kyndo
  • Moderator LVL 1

    • I am a geek!!

    • March 03, 2011, 09:45:24 am
    • Gyeongsangbuk-do
Re: Vaccine passport backlash
« Reply #20 on: January 05, 2022, 09:39:48 am »
A booster after 10 or 20 years is different from needing one every six months.
That's true. But keep in mind that most vaccines require several boosters within a few months of the original shot.

I'm in the process of arranging the last booster shots for my kid and myself for Hep (I was vaccinated when I was younger, but a routine blood screen showed that I lacked antigens for some reason.), and have finished running him back and forth to the clinic for most of his required immunizations and the requisite boosters. And there are a *lot* of boosters.

The Hep A and B shots require 2 or 3 booster shots at 6 month intervals.


DTap requires five doses during infancy, set at 3 month intervals. It's strongly recommended to get a booster a decade later (called TDaP).

While usually rolled in with the DTaP vaccine, Tetanus requires 2 booster shots in early childhood, and then requires another every ten years indefinitely (separate from DTaP or TDap). Usually people only bother when they step on a rusty nail or get tangled up in old barbed wire or something, but it's a good idea to keep up to date. Lockjaw is deadly.

Diphtheria requires a booster every 10 years.

MMR vaccine requires a booster or two as well.

I'm sure there are more, but those are the ones on my kiddo's immunization checklist that we've already been in for.

Either way, the other vaccines have gone through proper testing and trials and most people either know or expect that even if they don't know the details and equation of every trial.
The FDA conducted several trials before approving the mRNA vaccine. Here's a link so the FDA site with information on those trials: https://www.fda.gov/emergency-preparedness-and-response/coronavirus-disease-2019-covid-19/pfizer-biontech-covid-19-vaccine-frequently-asked-questions

There are also many ongoing trials. For example, here's a link to one current study involving 44,000 participants: https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/nejmoa2034577

No previous vaccine was approved in less than a year. 
If I recall correctly, the successful version of the Polio vaccine (there were several horrendously unsuccessful ones, unfortunately  :sad:) was approved in just under a year of it's development.

 
No previous vaccine approved had so many people still getting the illness in spite of a vaccine against it.
Yes and no.
The Covid vaccine had almost 100% efficacy against the original variants, but has shown to offer decreasing protection with each new variant (around only 50% efficacy for omicron, I believe) .
     But don't confuse efficacy with effectiveness: efficacy measures how well a vaccine can prevent one from becoming infected, while effectiveness denotes a vaccine's ability to "prevent outcomes of interest".
The effectiveness of the covid is currently measured by its ability to reduce the incidence of severe symptoms, hospitalization and deaths. In this sense, covid vaccines are still very effective . Due to the development of new variants, future boosters will be altered to target the new viral antigens (they currently are still using the original variant antigens) which will hopefully return their efficacy to previous levels. In this sense, covid shots will be very similar to flu shots.

Incidentally, flu shots can have pretty low efficacy depending on which strain of influenza is active during flu season.

 
No previous vaccine needed a booster every six months.
The influenza vaccine requires a booster every 6 to 12 months in order to maintain its effectiveness.

« Last Edit: January 05, 2022, 09:43:55 am by Kyndo »


  • JNM
  • Waygook Lord

    • 5010

    • January 19, 2015, 10:16:48 am
    • Cairo, Egypt (formerly Seoul)
Re: Vaccine passport backlash
« Reply #21 on: January 05, 2022, 09:42:30 am »
No previous vaccine needed a booster every six months.


Saying “boosters every 6 months” is not a fact, or a plan, but a worst case assumption. After a couple rounds we might learn that it is enough and consider it to be a “5 shot initial corse”.

Influenza mutates quickly, so people at risk or in certain professions get flu shots twice a year. Not technically a booster, but we might also see something like this going forward with covid.




Re: Vaccine passport backlash
« Reply #22 on: January 05, 2022, 11:07:13 am »
OK. I looked at it and this was a special program at one high school, rather than an average HS PE program. 

With your interest in physical fitness, why didn't you become a PE teacher or coach?
Uhm, I'm not a science teacher or history teacher or a sports coach but I'm interested in those things.

What an odd point to make.


Re: Vaccine passport backlash
« Reply #23 on: January 05, 2022, 11:09:16 am »
Of course I would, gotta keep up with the trends.

Also, I'd be lonely.
The important thing is to either go early and get the good view on the way down or to go at the end and you get to end up with your ass on top of everyone else.


  • gogators!
  • Waygook Lord

    • 5401

    • March 16, 2016, 04:35:48 pm
    • Seoul
Re: Vaccine passport backlash
« Reply #24 on: January 05, 2022, 11:55:56 am »
Uhm, I'm not a science teacher or history teacher or a sports coach but I'm interested in those things.

What an odd point to make.
Considering LI's many, many posts on health, not odd at all. I realize some are comfortable in the peanut gallery, but LI's constant refrain regarding health makes me think he or she might want to be part of the solution to an obvious problem.


  • D.L.Orean
  • Expert Waygook

    • 711

    • February 25, 2020, 09:34:41 am
Re: Vaccine passport backlash
« Reply #25 on: January 05, 2022, 12:07:29 pm »
Considering LI's many, many posts on health, not odd at all. I realize some are comfortable in the peanut gallery, but LI's constant refrain regarding health makes me think he or she might want to be part of the solution to an obvious problem.

We must rememeber just a few years ago he was unhappy with his weight (topped out at 365lbs which is especially high for someone who is only 5'5") and was on a steady diet of fast food. He made improvements for his own health. But he still has some way to go. He has previously stated he wants to get down from 230 to 170lbs. His constant harping on about fitness and healthy weight is an attempt to motivate himself. If it works, good for him. Health is wealth.
"in real life I have a Mensa level IQ. That’s the opposite of mentally retarded. People have told me I’m the smartest person they’ve ever met. Has anyone said that to you? Probably not."


Re: Vaccine passport backlash
« Reply #26 on: January 05, 2022, 12:50:34 pm »
We must rememeber just a few years ago he was unhappy with his weight (topped out at 365lbs which is especially high for someone who is only 5'5") and was on a steady diet of fast food. He made improvements for his own health. But he still has some way to go. He has previously stated he wants to get down from 230 to 170lbs. His constant harping on about fitness and healthy weight is an attempt to motivate himself. If it works, good for him. Health is wealth.

I have asked LI , twice I think, to post what he eats, and how he goes about being healthy. I'm interested and I'm pretty sure a few others may also be. I asked in all seriousness, but for some reason he just keeps posting his general speech of 'exercise and eat well'. Okay!, this is great but some "how I go about it' info would be much appreciated.


  • hangook77
  • The Legend

    • 4847

    • September 14, 2017, 09:10:12 am
    • Near Busan
Re: Vaccine passport backlash
« Reply #27 on: January 05, 2022, 03:03:58 pm »
That's true. But keep in mind that most vaccines require several boosters within a few months of the original shot.

I'm in the process of arranging the last booster shots for my kid and myself for Hep (I was vaccinated when I was younger, but a routine blood screen showed that I lacked antigens for some reason.), and have finished running him back and forth to the clinic for most of his required immunizations and the requisite boosters. And there are a *lot* of boosters.

The Hep A and B shots require 2 or 3 booster shots at 6 month intervals.


DTap requires five doses during infancy, set at 3 month intervals. It's strongly recommended to get a booster a decade later (called TDaP).

While usually rolled in with the DTaP vaccine, Tetanus requires 2 booster shots in early childhood, and then requires another every ten years indefinitely (separate from DTaP or TDap). Usually people only bother when they step on a rusty nail or get tangled up in old barbed wire or something, but it's a good idea to keep up to date. Lockjaw is deadly.

Diphtheria requires a booster every 10 years.

MMR vaccine requires a booster or two as well.

I'm sure there are more, but those are the ones on my kiddo's immunization checklist that we've already been in for.
The FDA conducted several trials before approving the mRNA vaccine. Here's a link so the FDA site with information on those trials: https://www.fda.gov/emergency-preparedness-and-response/coronavirus-disease-2019-covid-19/pfizer-biontech-covid-19-vaccine-frequently-asked-questions

There are also many ongoing trials. For example, here's a link to one current study involving 44,000 participants: https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/nejmoa2034577
If I recall correctly, the successful version of the Polio vaccine (there were several horrendously unsuccessful ones, unfortunately  :sad:) was approved in just under a year of it's development.

  Yes and no.
The Covid vaccine had almost 100% efficacy against the original variants, but has shown to offer decreasing protection with each new variant (around only 50% efficacy for omicron, I believe) .
     But don't confuse efficacy with effectiveness: efficacy measures how well a vaccine can prevent one from becoming infected, while effectiveness denotes a vaccine's ability to "prevent outcomes of interest".
The effectiveness of the covid is currently measured by its ability to reduce the incidence of severe symptoms, hospitalization and deaths. In this sense, covid vaccines are still very effective . Due to the development of new variants, future boosters will be altered to target the new viral antigens (they currently are still using the original variant antigens) which will hopefully return their efficacy to previous levels. In this sense, covid shots will be very similar to flu shots.

Incidentally, flu shots can have pretty low efficacy depending on which strain of influenza is active during flu season.

  The influenza vaccine requires a booster every 6 to 12 months in order to maintain its effectiveness.



I never took an influenza vaccine.  I rarely get colds.  I took all others.  Either way, big pharma is making a killing and their conglomerate owned media chains won't tell you any different.  You're still a sucker for taking it.  But you do you and I'll do me.  The government still has no right to restrict me or anyone else.  This vaccine is still not effective and the crises is still blown out of proportion.  I knew plenty who had it and recovered before you say the vaccine means you won't die.  Except you can die and folks have had heart attacks from it and other issues such as not healing properly after taking it.  The trials that are usually done for a few years were skipped.  So, data cannot be compared no matter how much big pharma and big media push their narrative.   


  • JNM
  • Waygook Lord

    • 5010

    • January 19, 2015, 10:16:48 am
    • Cairo, Egypt (formerly Seoul)
Re: Vaccine passport backlash
« Reply #28 on: January 05, 2022, 03:58:54 pm »
Big Phama = you and me through our pension funds


  • gogators!
  • Waygook Lord

    • 5401

    • March 16, 2016, 04:35:48 pm
    • Seoul
Re: Vaccine passport backlash
« Reply #29 on: January 05, 2022, 11:10:41 pm »
We must rememeber just a few years ago he was unhappy with his weight (topped out at 365lbs which is especially high for someone who is only 5'5") and was on a steady diet of fast food. He made improvements for his own health. But he still has some way to go. He has previously stated he wants to get down from 230 to 170lbs. His constant harping on about fitness and healthy weight is an attempt to motivate himself. If it works, good for him. Health is wealth.
Thanks for the info, I was unaware to that.


  • VanIslander
  • Moderator LVL 1

    • 3016

    • June 02, 2011, 10:12:19 am
    • Seogwipo, Jeju Island
    more
Re: Vaccine passport backlash
« Reply #30 on: January 05, 2022, 11:24:08 pm »
When I was in high school a 6'1 (185 cm) 195 lbs. tight end was considered a big guy in football. Nowadays he'd be a defensive safety.

They still make high school P.E. students run at least four laps (800 m) a week, don't they?

People keep looking bigger and bigger. Yet fitness seems to be... er, out of fashion? ...

One school suspended a teacher for making his students run a mile in rain. One friggin' mile. In water. Water coming down. Not enemy artillery. Ugh.

The world is slowly going mad...







  • Sagi Keun
  • Veteran

    • 107

    • May 10, 2018, 11:47:23 am
    • Los Angeles
Re: Vaccine passport backlash
« Reply #31 on: January 06, 2022, 12:46:33 am »
(I had no problem taking lots of other properly tested vaccines, so I am definitely not an anti vaxxer.  I just didn't abandon my common sense and blindly follow like a lemming.)

Agreed, it's a complex issue and trying to demonize those who don't want the vaccine or the pass just doesn't cut it.

I've also taken just about every vaccine under the sun but this time it's different.

because it's about government control and losing our freedoms.


  • Kyndo
  • Moderator LVL 1

    • I am a geek!!

    • March 03, 2011, 09:45:24 am
    • Gyeongsangbuk-do
Re: Vaccine passport backlash
« Reply #32 on: January 07, 2022, 08:10:44 am »
It's really disheartening when one writes (in my opinion) a polite, carefully sourced refutal to another poster's claim, and they ignore it all, replying instead with nothing more than a reiteration of their original unsubstantiated beliefs and a slew of ad hominems. Very disappointing.  :sad:


  • tylerthegloob
  • The Legend

    • 3063

    • September 28, 2016, 10:46:24 am
    • Busan
    more
Re: Vaccine passport backlash
« Reply #33 on: January 07, 2022, 08:21:38 am »
I've also taken just about every vaccine under the sun but this time it's different.

sooooo you didn't take this one?
more gg more skill


  • CO2
  • Waygook Lord

    • 7656

    • March 02, 2015, 03:41:14 pm
    • Uiwang
Re: Vaccine passport backlash
« Reply #34 on: January 07, 2022, 08:24:53 am »
I have a friend who won't get it and says that their Kor Co-T knows 4 people that died from the vaccine.

I mean, that's statistically impossible. Impossible? No. But statistically impossible, yes. Really, you know hundreds of thousands of people?

Sorry, no.

« Last Edit: January 07, 2022, 08:37:39 am by CO2 »