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  • gogators!
  • Waygook Lord

    • 6161

    • March 16, 2016, 04:35:48 pm
    • Seoul
Re: How has your attitude to Korea changed?
« Reply #100 on: May 08, 2022, 08:02:26 pm »
Over the past several years, Accenture has invested in a single global SAP system based on SAP S/4HANA, SAP Business Warehouse, and SAP HANA as a data mart.
Forbes, 24 June 2021
People raced out of a mart nearby with champagne bottles in hand.
Joseph Hoyt, Dallas News, 5 Apr. 2021
Local restaurants also have morphed into makeshift food marts, selling everything from groceries to hand sanitizer.
Kelly Tyko, USA TODAY, 9 Apr. 2020


  • VanIslander
  • Moderator LVL 1

    • 3850

    • June 02, 2011, 10:12:19 am
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Re: How has your attitude to Korea changed?
« Reply #101 on: May 08, 2022, 10:38:30 pm »
"Betimes" is also an archaic English term but one can google a dozen uses of it. Some people read history and use it.

I have never tried to "correct" or change Korean uses of words outside of the classroom. Konglish is Korean.

 They can borrow and use words however they like.

 "Service" for free things, "sharp" for mechanical pencil, "air con" for air conditioner or a/c, "eye shopping" for window shopping, "hot dog" for a bunless item known in English as a corndog, ... whatever.

As a teacher we should just make them AWARE of the difference. They - our students not those on the street - should learn the word "bun" and know in English every hot dog has one; a sweet bun, croissant or other pastry isn't bread in English because most uses of the word "bread" in English refers to baked products that are in sandwiches. A bakery makes cakes, pastry and bread.

Again, inside the classroom vs. outside the classroom is a good perspective to both doing your job and accommodating and appreciating the country.

When I first came here I immediately thought their use of English was wrong. After a few months I just saw it as different. Loan words are used in countless languages.
« Last Edit: May 09, 2022, 12:28:50 am by VanIslander »
Life's to live! Live! Breathe. Relax. Enjoy. Animals teach us to focus on family, friends and avoid danger. Get what you need and get along with others. That said, some rock the boat, but they know capsizin' it means they're sunk. Some sink, let's swim! The sea's big, great, but has undercurrents.


  • gogators!
  • Waygook Lord

    • 6161

    • March 16, 2016, 04:35:48 pm
    • Seoul
Re: How has your attitude to Korea changed?
« Reply #102 on: May 09, 2022, 01:23:06 am »
"Betimes" is also an archaic English term but one can google a dozen uses of it. Some people read history and use it.

I have never tried to "correct" or change Korean uses of words outside of the classroom. Konglish is Korean.

 They can borrow and use words however they like.

 "Service" for free things, "sharp" for mechanical pencil, "air con" for air conditioner or a/c, "eye shopping" for window shopping, "hot dog" for a bunless item known in English as a corndog, ... whatever.

As a teacher we should just make them AWARE of the difference. They - our students not those on the street - should learn the word "bun" and know in English every hot dog has one; a sweet bun, croissant or other pastry isn't bread in English because most uses of the word "bread" in English refers to baked products that are in sandwiches. A bakery makes cakes, pastry and bread.

Again, inside the classroom vs. outside the classroom is a good perspective to both doing your job and accommodating and appreciating the country.

When I first came here I immediately thought their use of English was wrong. After a few months I just saw it as different. Loan words are used in countless languages.
How far are you going to go to defend your "suspicions" regarding the use of mart. Three references in contemporary mass media (and many more could have been provided) do not justify the conclusion "some people read history and use it."

I don't think it's a big jump to think that more than a few of the good folks living in Kerrville, Comfort, Center Point, Bandera and  Fredericksburg, Texas say they are going to the mart for X, Y and Z.

I also don't think that many of them say "convenient store" as some Koreans do. Whatever.


  • VanIslander
  • Moderator LVL 1

    • 3850

    • June 02, 2011, 10:12:19 am
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Re: How has your attitude to Korea changed?
« Reply #103 on: May 09, 2022, 01:45:50 am »
I have never heard of "mart" in 33 years in Canada or after 50+ years and being a frequent movie viewer and an addict of reality comp shows (e.g., The Amazing Race, The Amazing Race Canada, Masterchef, Masterchef Canada, Masterchef Australia, Top Chef, Top Chef Canada). The ONLY place I have heard "a mart" uttered has been from a Korean in Korea (and a handful of posters on this site).

Teachers ought at least inform students about the word "store".
« Last Edit: May 09, 2022, 02:55:08 am by VanIslander »
Life's to live! Live! Breathe. Relax. Enjoy. Animals teach us to focus on family, friends and avoid danger. Get what you need and get along with others. That said, some rock the boat, but they know capsizin' it means they're sunk. Some sink, let's swim! The sea's big, great, but has undercurrents.


  • confusedsafferinkorea
  • Waygook Lord

    • 5992

    • October 08, 2010, 01:02:32 pm
    • Zhubei, Hsinchu County, Taiwan (not part of China)
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Re: How has your attitude to Korea changed?
« Reply #104 on: May 09, 2022, 05:51:25 am »
In SA we don't use mart, we say supermarket or shop.

Shop makes more sense than store or mart since we say, we are going shopping.
« Last Edit: May 09, 2022, 07:34:45 am by confusedsafferinkorea »
There is no known medical cure for stupidity!


  • Augustiner
  • Expert Waygook

    • 539

    • December 06, 2021, 01:18:06 pm
    • Anyang
Re: How has your attitude to Korea changed?
« Reply #105 on: May 09, 2022, 08:00:27 am »

Teachers ought at least inform students about the word "store".

Teachers should also learn that the term "air-con" is not Konglish.  Otherwise, they'll look kind of silly when they try to correct all those who use British English and use the term air-con.  Ever been to Thailand?  They don't say "air-con" because of K-pop. 


  • pkjh
  • The Legend

    • 2312

    • May 02, 2012, 02:59:44 pm
    • Asia
Re: How has your attitude to Korea changed?
« Reply #106 on: May 09, 2022, 08:08:47 am »
Teachers should also learn that the term "air-con" is not Konglish.  Otherwise, they'll look kind of silly when they try to correct all those who use British English and use the term air-con.  Ever been to Thailand?  They don't say "air-con" because of K-pop. 
Air-conditioning, air-con, or a/c are used where I grew up in Canada. Although a/c seems the most common.


  • Augustiner
  • Expert Waygook

    • 539

    • December 06, 2021, 01:18:06 pm
    • Anyang
Re: How has your attitude to Korea changed?
« Reply #107 on: May 09, 2022, 08:59:14 am »
Air-conditioning, air-con, or a/c are used where I grew up in Canada. Although a/c seems the most common.

I always said a/c or air-conditioning in Toronto.  It wasn't until I went to Thailand that I first heard air-con.  The British influence in terms of tourism was much greater than North American, so air-con was the term that was picked up.  One Korean teacher told me they use air-con here because a/c sounds too much like "aish." 


  • VanIslander
  • Moderator LVL 1

    • 3850

    • June 02, 2011, 10:12:19 am
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Re: How has your attitude to Korea changed?
« Reply #108 on: May 09, 2022, 10:35:35 am »
I always said a/c or air-conditioning in Toronto.  It wasn't until I went to Thailand that I first heard air-con.
You went to Thailand before South Korea?

Quote
One Korean teacher told me they use air-con here because a/c sounds too much like "aish"
"AISH!"

Konglish is Korean not English. Remember that.
« Last Edit: May 09, 2022, 10:37:26 am by VanIslander »
Life's to live! Live! Breathe. Relax. Enjoy. Animals teach us to focus on family, friends and avoid danger. Get what you need and get along with others. That said, some rock the boat, but they know capsizin' it means they're sunk. Some sink, let's swim! The sea's big, great, but has undercurrents.


  • Augustiner
  • Expert Waygook

    • 539

    • December 06, 2021, 01:18:06 pm
    • Anyang
Re: How has your attitude to Korea changed?
« Reply #109 on: May 09, 2022, 10:46:21 am »
You went to Thailand before South Korea?
"AISH!"

Konglish is Korean not English. Remember that.

What are you even talking about? You said the term air-con was Konglish.  It's not.  What does when I went to Thailand and Korea have to do with anything?  I'm saying the first time I heard the term "air-con" was in Thailand.   


  • Augustiner
  • Expert Waygook

    • 539

    • December 06, 2021, 01:18:06 pm
    • Anyang
Re: How has your attitude to Korea changed?
« Reply #110 on: May 09, 2022, 10:48:43 am »
And for the third time Van Islander, in NZ (and maybe Australia) a hot dog can be a sausage in a bun or on a stick. Not everywhere or everyone uses the word corndog. You know this...peope have told you this before, and yet you continue to think that only you are correct. It gets really tiring Van Islander.

Where I grew up in Canada we never used the term corndog. We called them Pogos after a popular brand.  I don't think I knew what a corndog was until I was in my teens. 


Re: How has your attitude to Korea changed?
« Reply #111 on: May 09, 2022, 12:08:22 pm »
I never heard the word "mart" before coming to SK in 2002. Is it a Brit thing?
Not even in this case?


  • hangook77
  • Waygook Lord

    • 5529

    • September 14, 2017, 09:10:12 am
    • Near Busan
Re: How has your attitude to Korea changed?
« Reply #112 on: May 09, 2022, 12:16:50 pm »
Not even in this case?


Wal Mart. 

But yeah, we usually say grocery store or supermarket or something like that.  Superstore or Sobeys is an example of a grocery store or supermarket.  But Wal Mart is getting into groceries and Superstore has been creeping into Wal Mart's territory for years, albeit on a small scale.  (Damn, I miss President's Choice.)
745sticky, Augustiner, Bakeacake, D.L.Orean, Lazio, Mithras, Renma, Rye are still blocked and I can't see them.


  • VanIslander
  • Moderator LVL 1

    • 3850

    • June 02, 2011, 10:12:19 am
    • South Gyeongsang province for 13 years (with a 7-year Jeju interlude)
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Re: How has your attitude to Korea changed?
« Reply #113 on: May 09, 2022, 12:36:29 pm »
1. I said at the start that mart is used in English in NAMES like Walmart.

2. If you don't believe "air con" is Konglish August, then please explain. I have never heard it outside this country. And i ain't no spring chicken.
Life's to live! Live! Breathe. Relax. Enjoy. Animals teach us to focus on family, friends and avoid danger. Get what you need and get along with others. That said, some rock the boat, but they know capsizin' it means they're sunk. Some sink, let's swim! The sea's big, great, but has undercurrents.


  • Mr C
  • The Legend

    • 3686

    • October 17, 2012, 03:00:40 pm
    • Seoul
Re: How has your attitude to Korea changed?
« Reply #114 on: May 09, 2022, 12:41:55 pm »
Wal Mart. 

But yeah, we usually say grocery store or supermarket or something like that.  Superstore or Sobeys is an example of a grocery store or supermarket.  But Wal Mart is getting into groceries

Huh?

Although Walmart is not classified as a supermarket it dominates the U.S. grocery market and is, by far, the largest food retailer in the country so we keep it as the number one grocery chain. Walmart has more than a 26% share of all groceries sold and in some locales it commands a 90% market share.  -- https://www.foodindustry.com/articles/top-10-grocers-in-the-united-states-2019/


  • Augustiner
  • Expert Waygook

    • 539

    • December 06, 2021, 01:18:06 pm
    • Anyang
Re: How has your attitude to Korea changed?
« Reply #115 on: May 09, 2022, 12:47:06 pm »
1. I said at the start that mart is used in English in NAMES like Walmart.

2. If you don't believe "air con" is Konglish August, then please explain. I have never heard it outside this country. And i ain't no spring chicken.

It's not a question of belief.  It's just a fact.  A/C is a North American thing.  Places that have had a bigger British influence use air con. 

First thing that popped up when I googled it from Oxford dictionary. 

air con
noun
short for air conditioning.

 I had only ever heard A/C growing up in Canada, but air con was the term used everywhere in Thailand and down through Malaysia and Singapore when I travelled to those places. 


  • Augustiner
  • Expert Waygook

    • 539

    • December 06, 2021, 01:18:06 pm
    • Anyang
Re: How has your attitude to Korea changed?
« Reply #116 on: May 09, 2022, 12:55:17 pm »
Huh?

Although Walmart is not classified as a supermarket it dominates the U.S. grocery market and is, by far, the largest food retailer in the country so we keep it as the number one grocery chain. Walmart has more than a 26% share of all groceries sold and in some locales it commands a 90% market share.  -- https://www.foodindustry.com/articles/top-10-grocers-in-the-united-states-2019/

He should of specified he was speaking about Walmart in Canada and going back about 15 years when some Walmarts in Canada started getting into groceries.  At least back in 2008 there were regular Walmarts that didn't carry groceries and the Walmart Supercentres that did.  I remember it was big news when it happened.  We wanted our Walmarts to be on par with the big ones down in the states.  Today, I don't know if there's a difference.  The last time I visited a Walmart in Toronto it was one with groceries. 


  • hangook77
  • Waygook Lord

    • 5529

    • September 14, 2017, 09:10:12 am
    • Near Busan
Re: How has your attitude to Korea changed?
« Reply #117 on: May 09, 2022, 12:56:45 pm »
He should of specified he was speaking about Walmart in Canada and going back about 15 years when some Walmarts in Canada started getting into groceries.  At least back in 2008 there were regular Walmarts that didn't carry groceries and the Walmart Supercentres that did.  I remember it was big news when it happened.  We wanted our Walmarts to be on par with the big ones down in the states.  Today, I don't know if there's a difference.  The last time I visited a Walmart in Toronto it was one with groceries. 

I was in Korea then.  Saw a couple on my visits home though.  I think post 2013 or 2014.  Wal Mart was prompted to go full tilt when Target was coming into Canada.  They were building during my visit in 2013.  Took over an old Zellers and expanded it.  Next visit home was 2018 and it was already long gone. 

Funny enough I did visit one of those large Wal Marts for the first time in 2008 in the US during an American visit from Korea and a Sams Club too.  But the next time I was in one of these grocery Wal Marts was 10 years later in 2018 (in the Maritimes).  Quite a bit larger than the old Wal Marts.  Superstore is getting a run for it's money.  Though I still like some of the President's Choice products and some of the no label or no brand (I forget what they are called actually, yellow label.  No frills?)  Costco was rebuilt and moved to a much larger location with gas in my hometown too.  More competition than ever before it seems.  Blurred lines. 
« Last Edit: May 09, 2022, 01:02:59 pm by hangook77 »
745sticky, Augustiner, Bakeacake, D.L.Orean, Lazio, Mithras, Renma, Rye are still blocked and I can't see them.


  • Augustiner
  • Expert Waygook

    • 539

    • December 06, 2021, 01:18:06 pm
    • Anyang
Re: How has your attitude to Korea changed?
« Reply #118 on: May 09, 2022, 01:12:48 pm »
Don't get me started on Walmarts in Korea.  When I first moved to Anyang and learned there was a Walmart at Pyeongcheon Station I was excited.  Until I went.  It was nothing like a Walmart in Canada, let alone the states. 


  • VanIslander
  • Moderator LVL 1

    • 3850

    • June 02, 2011, 10:12:19 am
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Re: How has your attitude to Korea changed?
« Reply #119 on: May 09, 2022, 01:24:05 pm »
... A/C is a North American thing...  I had only ever heard A/C growing up in Canada, but air con was the term used everywhere in Thailand and down through Malaysia and Singapore when I travelled to those places.
Agreed.
Life's to live! Live! Breathe. Relax. Enjoy. Animals teach us to focus on family, friends and avoid danger. Get what you need and get along with others. That said, some rock the boat, but they know capsizin' it means they're sunk. Some sink, let's swim! The sea's big, great, but has undercurrents.