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  • Kayos
  • The Legend

    • 2334

    • March 31, 2016, 07:13:57 pm
    • NZ
Re: Does serving spicy food to young children violate human rights?
« Reply #60 on: November 15, 2021, 12:45:45 pm »
the problem with pizza day/hamburger day/etc isnt that the ingredients include cheese and meat, its that its covered in grease.


i wouldnt say so. im pretty sure everybody agrees the (comparatively) healthy school lunches here are a big improvement over the shit in the states (not sure how it is for you aussie, bri'ish and SA folks). if they suddenly started serving unhealthy shit you'd definitely see threads popping up about it. hell, i'm pretty sure we've witnessed at least a few conversations about rising obesity in korea on this site.

In NZ parents have to provide lunch for the students to take to school. When you get to high school, there is a convenience store (which we called the canteen) which sells stuff to students. A couple years after I left high school, they weren't allowed to sell sodas at school anymore, and was a big push to reduce sugary foods. I think now they have a small selection of unhealthy stuff like pies, but most have to sell healthier foods now. The schools don't, or at least didn't, provide lunch for the students.


Re: Does serving spicy food to young children violate human rights?
« Reply #61 on: November 15, 2021, 12:59:23 pm »
If you're going to carry on about what dreck some other food is, make sure you have your own stuff together. Try and be objective.
 :huh:
Why do you hate Lebanese food so much?
Seeing this kind of ethnicity-based discrimination from you is really disheartening.   :sad:


 :wink:

I apologize to the Lebanese community for inadvertently getting caught in the crossfire of my struggle. That already happens to you far too much.


  • VanIslander
  • Moderator LVL 1

    • 3016

    • June 02, 2011, 10:12:19 am
    • Seogwipo, Jeju Island
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Re: Does serving spicy food to young children violate human rights?
« Reply #62 on: November 15, 2021, 01:02:35 pm »
Back home we brought an apple, banana or orange to school as a snack.

Students here don't even recognize fruit as a "snack". And nuts are only for men to nibble on with beer, apparently.


  • Kayos
  • The Legend

    • 2334

    • March 31, 2016, 07:13:57 pm
    • NZ
Re: Does serving spicy food to young children violate human rights?
« Reply #63 on: November 15, 2021, 01:05:09 pm »
Well, perhaps I'm basing this off the days of yore when people would complain on these forums about the school lunches in Korea and gripe about things from  a taste perspective. One time someone claimed that Korean school lunches lacked variety and everyone agreed. I had to literally take a cafeteria menu from the U.S. and from Korea and point out that actually, Korean school menus were more diverse in terms of ingredients, sauces, etc. Predictably some still refused to admit that.

So I don't hold out much hope that it's just about nutrition and health for everyone on this. Obviously for some it is. The others I suspect have a decent stack of pizza and chicken boxes.

I think a problem as the school lunch menu is chosen by the staff at the school, it's not mandated by the government, so you have wildly varying menu's between schools.

Using my schools as an example.
My Friday school seems to always do the same menu and doesn't seem to vary a lot. My students often complain cause they are bored of it, whereas I make my own lunch and bring it, and they will eye my lunch the entire time. I often get students asking to try some of my lunch because they want something different. I've also had the lunch lady scream at me for bringing my own lunch - their usual menu is stuff I can't eat. The weekly menu that is up in the cafeteria hasn't changed in 2 years (I sit right next to the menu on the wall while eating lunch, and often stare at it while bored :P )

My Wednesday school varies the menu a lot. 2 weeks ago, I had both JJajangmyeon and sweet and sour pork, and there is often foods I can eat there.

My main school loves seafood, which I'm allergic to, so most of the time it's seafood related, most of it seems to be similar, they occasionally changed things up and cooked chicken or pork. However, this semester we got a new cafeteria staff line up, and I've started eating lunch at home since my house is just down the road from the school. So I have no idea if they have changed it up. The old way was about 3 - 4 days seafood, and 1 - 2 days something different.

3 schools, that all do lunch differently. The people that didn't agree may have based it off of their school's lunch menu. Their schools may not have been varying it up much, if at all.


Re: Does serving spicy food to young children violate human rights?
« Reply #64 on: November 15, 2021, 01:05:57 pm »
Given the health benefits of spicy food...I would argue that not serving spicy food to young children is a violation of their human right to good health.
Wait you mean consuming spicy food doesn't in fact turn you into a walking ball of stomach cancer and irritable bowel?

Or you know, anyone could have looked at all the countries that serve spicy food, noted that not all of them have big rates of stomach cancer, noted that #s 2 and 3 on the list were Mongolia and Japan, not exactly two pillars of spice. But hey, blame the kimchi and not the massive amounts of alcohol+bbqd meat+drinking instant ramen soup consumption. Yeah, it's definitely the moderately spiced pickled cabbage.  :rolleyes:


  • VanIslander
  • Moderator LVL 1

    • 3016

    • June 02, 2011, 10:12:19 am
    • Seogwipo, Jeju Island
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Re: Does serving spicy food to young children violate human rights?
« Reply #65 on: November 15, 2021, 10:58:10 pm »
... Yeah, it's definitely the moderately spiced pickled cabbage.  :rolleyes:
It may be the pickling itself.

Poland is famous for pickles but has a huge stomach cancer problem, too.

Koreans have vocalized concerns over salt consumption, an additive to most pickling.

Eat veggies fresh. Modern living gives us refrigeration. Use it.
« Last Edit: November 15, 2021, 11:01:53 pm by VanIslander »


  • hangook77
  • The Legend

    • 4847

    • September 14, 2017, 09:10:12 am
    • Near Busan
Re: Does serving spicy food to young children violate human rights?
« Reply #66 on: November 16, 2021, 12:33:37 pm »
In NZ parents have to provide lunch for the students to take to school. When you get to high school, there is a convenience store (which we called the canteen) which sells stuff to students. A couple years after I left high school, they weren't allowed to sell sodas at school anymore, and was a big push to reduce sugary foods. I think now they have a small selection of unhealthy stuff like pies, but most have to sell healthier foods now. The schools don't, or at least didn't, provide lunch for the students.

Seems similar to my Canadian experience, except my middle school was near my home.  So, we went home for lunch.  My mom usually made lunch.  Campbells soup and some grilled cheese.  I ate it while watching batman cartoons on TV.  Then, went back to school for the afternoon.  High School had a small canteen where you could buy mostly junk food.  But, we could go home if it was close enough or we could go out to eat.  Every franchise was located near my High School.  McDonald's, Burger King, Pizza Hut, Dominoes, Arby's, KFC, Ponderosa / Bonanza (steak house), a couple of convenience stores that made their own sandwiches, etc.  The other High Schools not so much, except for one that had a couple of smaller restaurants and one franchise nearby.  I forgot how nice it was to go home at lunch.


  • Kayos
  • The Legend

    • 2334

    • March 31, 2016, 07:13:57 pm
    • NZ
Re: Does serving spicy food to young children violate human rights?
« Reply #67 on: November 16, 2021, 01:15:35 pm »
Seems similar to my Canadian experience, except my middle school was near my home.  So, we went home for lunch.  My mom usually made lunch.  Campbells soup and some grilled cheese.  I ate it while watching batman cartoons on TV.  Then, went back to school for the afternoon.  High School had a small canteen where you could buy mostly junk food.  But, we could go home if it was close enough or we could go out to eat.  Every franchise was located near my High School.  McDonald's, Burger King, Pizza Hut, Dominoes, Arby's, KFC, Ponderosa / Bonanza (steak house), a couple of convenience stores that made their own sandwiches, etc.  The other High Schools not so much, except for one that had a couple of smaller restaurants and one franchise nearby.  I forgot how nice it was to go home at lunch.

Ahh, I think the difference is students aren't allowed to leave school during the day unless a parent pulls them out, or if they are in their final year of high school, then the students can leave for lunch. I think it's a liability thing, if the student gets hurt during the day, the school is liable.


  • confusedsafferinkorea
  • Waygook Lord

    • 5822

    • October 08, 2010, 01:02:32 pm
    • Zhubei, Hsinchu County, Taiwan (not part of China)
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Re: Does serving spicy food to young children violate human rights?
« Reply #68 on: November 16, 2021, 02:47:08 pm »
In SA, lunch is not provided unless you are in a boarding school so we took lunch from home or went home for lunch.
There is no known medical cure for stupidity!


  • gogators!
  • Waygook Lord

    • 5401

    • March 16, 2016, 04:35:48 pm
    • Seoul
Re: Does serving spicy food to young children violate human rights?
« Reply #69 on: November 16, 2021, 07:34:04 pm »
I think it's a liability thing, if the student gets hurt during the day, the school is liable.

In loco parentis.


  • VanIslander
  • Moderator LVL 1

    • 3016

    • June 02, 2011, 10:12:19 am
    • Seogwipo, Jeju Island
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Re: Does serving spicy food to young children violate human rights?
« Reply #70 on: November 17, 2021, 03:17:54 am »
Cheongyang chili pepper (Korean: 청양고추) is a medium-sized chilli cultivar of the species Capsicum annuum, with intensity of 10,000 Scoville heat units. It is also a significant source of Vitamin C.