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Re: What is it with Korean "Celebrations"?
« Reply #40 on: September 23, 2021, 12:40:25 pm »
c̸͇̍o̵̟͆m̶̪͋e̴̮̾ẗ̴̻h̸̥̀ ̵͙͋ţ̸͑h̶͙́ê̵̪ ̴͚͌g̶͍̓l̴̻̒o̸̪͊ą̴̅m̸̦̆i̴̥̊n̴͙̈g̴̗̈́


  • tylerthegloob
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Re: What is it with Korean "Celebrations"?
« Reply #41 on: September 23, 2021, 12:45:48 pm »
c̸͇̍o̵̟͆m̶̪͋e̴̮̾ẗ̴̻h̸̥̀ ̵͙͋ţ̸͑h̶͙́ê̵̪ ̴͚͌g̶͍̓l̴̻̒o̸̪͊ą̴̅m̸̦̆i̴̥̊n̴͙̈g̴̗̈́

amen, brother!
more gg more skill


  • Kyndo
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Re: What is it with Korean "Celebrations"?
« Reply #42 on: September 23, 2021, 12:57:44 pm »
Chinese New Year will begin Tuesday, February 1st, 2022. Typically, Chinese offices and factories close for about three working weeks, allowing workers time to travel back home to spend the holiday with their families.
https://www.ewmfg.com/chinese-new-year/

That's pretty cool for the factory workers!

But since public school students in both China and South Korea average around 220 school days per year, the number of potential school holidays are pretty much the same.

Again, it's up to the individual schools (or the POEs etc) to determine teacher's vacation time.

For example, many international school give about a month for winter vacation, while unis give far, far more.
EPIK, of course, is a bit stingy with their holiday days, I'll give you that.
« Last Edit: September 23, 2021, 01:05:35 pm by Kyndo »


  • pkjh
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Re: What is it with Korean "Celebrations"?
« Reply #43 on: September 23, 2021, 01:13:33 pm »
But yeah, it will change because the young Koreans hate it also and they are becoming very westernized and will not continue these traditions going forth (which is both good and sad).   I think the Chinese will keep their history and traditions a lot longer than the Japanese and Koreans as they are abandoning their roots and adopting a more westernized "I don't care" attitude of the past.
It's a trend with all developing countries. The more 'developed' they are the more they abandon their traditions and be more like Western countries. Taiwan, Hong Kong, and Singapore are good examples of how different they are from their mainland Chinese bretheren. In another 30 years almost nobody will be going to their grandparent's hometowns in Korea, since all their grandparents will be pushing daisies.

I just think 3 days is lame.  It forces everyone to crowd into things at the same time.  Geeze, doesn't China give a couple of weeks or more for these holidays?  New Years almost a month?  At least Korea could give a full week off at ChHuseok (Monday to Friday).  Quit being so stingy.  Folks could travel at different times on different days then.  It would reduce the traffic jams.  But that would be logical.
Way back, like in 1962 Korea, they used to have like 2 official weeks off. Of course back then it took like 16 hours to train it from Seoul to Busan.


  • OnNut81
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Re: What is it with Korean "Celebrations"?
« Reply #44 on: September 23, 2021, 01:38:43 pm »
It's a trend with all developing countries. The more 'developed' they are the more they abandon their traditions and be more like Western countries. Taiwan, Hong Kong, and Singapore are good examples of how different they are from their mainland Chinese bretheren. In another 30 years almost nobody will be going to their grandparent's hometowns in Korea, since all their grandparents will be pushing daisies.


Not arguing that they won't be doing the home town thing, but I believe in 30 years the grandparents that are pushing up daisies will be replaced by new grandparents.  They're like weeds, those grandparents. 


  • pkjh
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Re: What is it with Korean "Celebrations"?
« Reply #45 on: September 23, 2021, 02:57:03 pm »
Not arguing that they won't be doing the home town thing, but I believe in 30 years the grandparents that are pushing up daisies will be replaced by new grandparents.  They're like weeds, those grandparents. 
And the new crop of grandparents will have been born in the same cities as their kids. So little reason to go back to their hometowns of 3 generations. Only the hardcore traditionalists will do this, which aren't really that many in virtually all societies outside of the Taliban.


Re: What is it with Korean "Celebrations"?
« Reply #46 on: September 23, 2021, 03:06:26 pm »
I think a certain segment of the population will try and keep things like family Thanksgiving and Christmas going (if for no other reason than foodie stuff). I also think that some people may realize that spending the holidays devoid of anything family based and instead trying to get another endorphin/dopamine hit vacation in isn't as great as it once was. Yeah getting pissed 3 days in a row when you're 24 is great, at 40 it isn't. And hopping off to Bali isn't really as rewarding as taking the kids to see grandma and spending quality time together.
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Re: What is it with Korean "Celebrations"?
« Reply #47 on: September 23, 2021, 03:14:09 pm »
And the new crop of grandparents will have been born in the same cities as their kids. So little reason to go back to their hometowns of 3 generations. Only the hardcore traditionalists will do this, which aren't really that many in virtually all societies outside of the Taliban.

I don't know. If you speak to Korean adults of working age, they very often say they'd like to retire to the countryside.


  • OnNut81
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Re: What is it with Korean "Celebrations"?
« Reply #48 on: September 23, 2021, 03:14:37 pm »
And hopping off to Bali isn't really as rewarding as taking the kids to see grandma and spending quality time together.

Yeah, try telling that to the mom's that cook and slave all Chuseok, and the kids that.  "Hey kids, instead of taking an airplane ride and going somewhere new you can tell all your friends at school about, we're going to to Iksan!"  "Why are you crying?  You love puffed corn and the smell of mothballs!" 


Re: What is it with Korean "Celebrations"?
« Reply #49 on: September 23, 2021, 03:36:31 pm »
Yeah, try telling that to the mom's that cook and slave all Chuseok, and the kids that.  "Hey kids, instead of taking an airplane ride and going somewhere new you can tell all your friends at school about, we're going to to Iksan!"  "Why are you crying?  You love puffed corn and the smell of mothballs!" 
Grass is always greener. Obviously slaving for 72 hours isn't great either. Of course these days its often 1-2 big meals and the rest is pizza, chicken, jokbal, and going out into town to eat and drink with old classmates.

The answer is more balance in the prep and perhaps alternating years of whose house, with the third being a vacation year.
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  • pkjh
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Re: What is it with Korean "Celebrations"?
« Reply #50 on: September 23, 2021, 08:25:59 pm »
I don't know. If you speak to Korean adults of working age, they very often say they'd like to retire to the countryside.
A lot of people say that, but very few will. Otherwise the country side would see a boom in population, which we have yet to see.


  • JNM
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Re: What is it with Korean "Celebrations"?
« Reply #51 on: September 23, 2021, 11:38:08 pm »
A lot of people say that, but very few will. Otherwise the country side would see a boom in population, which we have yet to see.

It gets said in a lot of places, but when the time comes, they want to be close to their grandchildren, their doctors, their friends…


Re: What is it with Korean "Celebrations"?
« Reply #52 on: September 24, 2021, 01:07:54 am »
It gets said in a lot of places, but when the time comes, they want to be close to their grandchildren, their doctors, their friends…

Maybe, but we're talking about a future generation. In 20 years time say, it's going to be very tempting for retirees with property in Seoul to cash in on the price of apartments there to fund their retirement. Though you're right that the same people who say they want to retire in the countryside are often those who say they like living in cities because of all the facilities, like hospitals. As with a,lot of things, it could be they're just saying the first thing that comes to mind when trying to converse in a foreign language.
« Last Edit: September 24, 2021, 01:13:08 am by grimlock2 »


  • hangook77
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Re: What is it with Korean "Celebrations"?
« Reply #53 on: September 24, 2021, 10:38:10 am »
That's pretty cool for the factory workers!

But since public school students in both China and South Korea average around 220 school days per year, the number of potential school holidays are pretty much the same.

Again, it's up to the individual schools (or the POEs etc) to determine teacher's vacation time.

For example, many international school give about a month for winter vacation, while unis give far, far more.
EPIK, of course, is a bit stingy with their holiday days, I'll give you that.

All the friends I knew who did schools in China, got about that time off in Feb.  China has better transportation now with high speed rails and many airports, etc.  So, they can get home quickly.  Either way, in Korea taking at least a week off would allow folks the flexibility to visit family at different times.  They don't have to all be there on Chuseok day.  They can just go sometime that week.  Would reduce traffic, emissions , etc.  Folks could visit the grandma anytime that week.  Go a day or two before or after Chuseok. 

In the past my schools would have prob taken these two days extra off this week and let me take it too.  Now, we don't.  Though if they did take the days off and I had an anal school, they might still make me come in and deskwarm now anyways, just to be mean.  Who knows? 


  • Kyndo
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Re: What is it with Korean "Celebrations"?
« Reply #54 on: September 24, 2021, 10:49:42 am »
Would probably help with the traffic quite a bit, definitely.
I had to travel to Incheon on Monday, and wow was that a grind.
« Last Edit: September 24, 2021, 10:51:32 am by Kyndo »


  • hangook77
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Re: What is it with Korean "Celebrations"?
« Reply #55 on: September 24, 2021, 11:07:35 am »
Would probably help with the traffic quite a bit, definitely.
I had to travel to Incheon on Monday, and wow was that a grind.

That's why if they made it a full week, folks could travel at different times.  Not everyone would have to go to grannies place on the Chuseok day, just sometime near it.  A bit of flexibility in travel times. 


  • Kyndo
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Re: What is it with Korean "Celebrations"?
« Reply #56 on: September 24, 2021, 11:16:56 am »
Right.


  • pkjh
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Re: What is it with Korean "Celebrations"?
« Reply #57 on: September 24, 2021, 12:42:19 pm »
That's why if they made it a full week, folks could travel at different times.  Not everyone would have to go to grannies place on the Chuseok day, just sometime near it.  A bit of flexibility in travel times. 
That would be like having Christmas the day before, or the day after. The point is to have their ceremonies on the actual day of Chuseok.

Anyways, Koreans used to get more time off because of the travel times back 60 years ago. The days off centered around the actual day of Chuseok. But modernity, and business demand has reduced the holiday to mostly 3 days. My bet is in the future China will slow shorten those holidays. The reason they get so much time off is because of travel times in the not so distant past, like 20 years ago.


  • hangook77
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Re: What is it with Korean "Celebrations"?
« Reply #58 on: September 24, 2021, 02:17:42 pm »
That would be like having Christmas the day before, or the day after. The point is to have their ceremonies on the actual day of Chuseok.

Anyways, Koreans used to get more time off because of the travel times back 60 years ago. The days off centered around the actual day of Chuseok. But modernity, and business demand has reduced the holiday to mostly 3 days. My bet is in the future China will slow shorten those holidays. The reason they get so much time off is because of travel times in the not so distant past, like 20 years ago.

But most Koreans no longer view that specific day as a religion and they can still choose to come back on the next day or two or three days later if they had the proper time off.  They just go to visit living families.  Some don't even go home on the holiday or go at a different time anyways.  They can still make it a week holiday since it would be a good destress and unwind for everyone. 


  • pkjh
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Re: What is it with Korean "Celebrations"?
« Reply #59 on: September 25, 2021, 12:35:17 am »
But most Koreans no longer view that specific day as a religion and they can still choose to come back on the next day or two or three days later if they had the proper time off.  They just go to visit living families.  Some don't even go home on the holiday or go at a different time anyways.  They can still make it a week holiday since it would be a good destress and unwind for everyone. 
Koreans have really never viewed that day as a religion. But it's part of their cultural practices. And it's specific to that day where they pay respect to the paternal side of the family. The other days are for the other side of the family. They are not going to re-expand on the holidays in this day and age, because you think they should. Some hardcore traditionalist will go on their dead relative's birthdays to do rituals for up to their great-grand-parents. But a lot of the younger generations just do it for their parents. And some families do include women in the rituals.