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With the government scholarship TaLK program coming to an end by the end of this year, there might be a new opportunity for Native teachers holding a 2~ or -3 year college diplomas to try their hand out at teaching in a Korean Hakwon in the future. This has to due with the Korean law, which only requires foreign Hakwon teachers to hold university degrees but not their Korean counterparts. So on the basis of discrimination, the requirement for Native teachers might be lowered in the Hakwon industry.  Since in Korea, the level of education is highly considered, there will be room for a different kind of wage discrimination comming soon... The Hakwon owners will start offering the TaLK wage of 1.5 mill a month (and justify it as please understand that this is Korea and your education is too low for higher salary). The Hakwon owners are going to be raking in mad money soon!!!

If the requirements are changed, I am seriously going to consider opening my own Hakwon and raking in the money.
I'll beat the Korean ajjushi's to it and become the richest 30 something year old waygook ajjumma!

But in all seriousness, what do you guys make of this ....?
I assume that the biggest hurdle would be at the final E-2 visa stage, which the Korean government grants to only  university grads, How easy would the amendment to the E-2 visa be from a legal standpoint? Or would the internal changes to requirements would be absolutely meaningless and only made to looks less discriminatory on paper?

http://m.koreaherald.com/view.php?ud=20210904000051&fbclid=IwAR2hMNnXd_QrxT2aUa_F0yEZXVMx6NnNE2dZOwc2qHU5xfStvxv8R9LUZG4
« Last Edit: September 05, 2021, 01:26:09 pm by HiddenInKorea »


Yeah, I saw this article earlier today.

I don't think amending E-2 laws would be a problem, if the government wants change. Didn't they kind of amend the F-2 laws regarding the Afghani people who were airlifted to Korea. They seem to have different options available to them compared to say those who are points based (could be way wrong about this though).

Personally this doesn't worry me at all. If the diplomas are relevant to education, and not paperhanging or winemaking etc, then yeah...
Can't be worse than some of the degreed tragedies I've come across posing as English teachers, over the years.

We'll see what happens. You have to also remember that this discrepancy between Korean and Native teachers was pointed out as being unfair by the NHRCK and I have no idea how much weight or influence thay have in changing policy.


That's not what the article says.


That's not what the article says.

You're absolutely right. Nothing was said about law changes or allowing E2 teachers with only diplomas.

I think 'HiddenInKorea', brought up a 'what if' kind of discussion (at least that's how I read it).

Someone will be in soon enough to discuss possible lower wages. Just people talking.



  • VanIslander
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A watchdog barked.
A reporter reported it.
Nothing else happened.


If anything they'd just require that Korean teachers have to have a full diploma. But I bet they won't pay them more. Keep in mind that 2.1m is usually the basement for E-2 hagwon pay, but Korean teachers at hagwons make much less (around 1.5m from what I've heard) and don't get a free apartment.


  • hangook77
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If anything they'd just require that Korean teachers have to have a full diploma. But I bet they won't pay them more. Keep in mind that 2.1m is usually the basement for E-2 hagwon pay, but Korean teachers at hagwons make much less (around 1.5m from what I've heard) and don't get a free apartment.

Korean teachers did get 1.5 mil in hakwons.  But minimum wage next year is 1.9ish per month.  I think I saw they were making around 2 mil nowadays?  Only the foriegn teacher never got a raise. 


  • OnNut81
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Korean teachers did get 1.5 mil in hakwons.  But minimum wage next year is 1.9ish per month.  I think I saw they were making around 2 mil nowadays?  Only the foriegn teacher never got a raise. 

Foreign teachers have always gotten a raise in my experience at hakwans.  Each year that a foreign teacher stuck around they were given an additional 100K per month normally.  I got 150K per month when I did an additional year at the boot camp known a Poly. 


  • hangook77
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Foreign teachers have always gotten a raise in my experience at hakwans.  Each year that a foreign teacher stuck around they were given an additional 100K per month normally.  I got 150K per month when I did an additional year at the boot camp known a Poly. 

But how many are up over 3 million a month now?  I think many are still 2.1 to 2.3 with a few occasionally going to 2.5.  I do know there are a handful of schools that will pay 2.8 to 3.0.  I use to see some Gangnam kindies paying that but they were not frequent. 


  • hangook77
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In relation to the article, I thought it was immigration requiring a 4 year degree.  I didn't think the acadamies chose that rule?  I thought also the lcoal education office regulated some of this.  I suppose some married F Visa folks could take advantage for those rare few who don't have an undergrad though if they changed the rules for them. 


  • Kyndo
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Re: Native Teachers without College Degrees Might be Allowed to Teach at Hakwons
« Reply #10 on: September 06, 2021, 09:25:28 am »
In relation to the article, I thought it was immigration requiring a 4 year degree.  I didn't think the acadamies chose that rule?  I thought also the local education office regulated some of this.  I suppose some married F Visa folks could take advantage for those rare few who don't have an undergrad though if they changed the rules for them. 
It might also allow those on student visas to work at hagwons, if they've received permission from their university.


  • Liechtenstein
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Re: Native Teachers without College Degrees Might be Allowed to Teach at Hakwons
« Reply #11 on: September 06, 2021, 11:37:00 am »
Nothing wrong with that. When I was in Korea back in 2005 there was a foreign teacher who had just arrived with a 20 year old degree in anthropology.


Re: Native Teachers without College Degrees Might be Allowed to Teach at Hakwons
« Reply #12 on: September 06, 2021, 11:54:41 am »
A watchdog barked.
A reporter reported it.
Nothing else happened.

I hope that it's just that....

I just had a chat about this with my main Korean co-teacher who had extensive work experience in Hakwons before becoming a long-term contract teacher at a public school, and she confirmed that there was not a single Korean teacher that was able to be hired with only a 2 -year college diploma to teach English at any Hakwon where she worked, as some parents demanded to see the teacher's profiles and qualifications. The only place she mentioned where Korean teachers with 2-year diplomas were able to work are the lower level of kindergartens (어린이 집), and as assistants at Kindergartens (유치원).
So maybe this is aimed towards addressing discrimination at  those workplace since many childcare places here tend to be private and run more as academies?


Re: Native Teachers without College Degrees Might be Allowed to Teach at Hakwons
« Reply #13 on: September 06, 2021, 12:09:33 pm »
Nothing wrong with that. When I was in Korea back in 2005 there was a foreign teacher who had just arrived with a 20 year old degree in anthropology.

But that's just that, it was a degree ... regardless of how long ago it was completed.. 20... 15.... 10 years ago...
The teacher achieved a proper level of education  more suited towards working with acquiring, synthesizing, and teaching information and language.
If the teacher just had a 2 year diploma, his or her skills would be more on the technical side for completing given tasks, rather than designing English Language teaching materials or building a curriculum for a Hakwon.

That's why even in North America there is a difference between a Teacher and Teacher's assistant.


  • Liechtenstein
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    • February 15, 2019, 04:39:00 pm
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Re: Native Teachers without College Degrees Might be Allowed to Teach at Hakwons
« Reply #14 on: September 06, 2021, 01:22:50 pm »
But that's just that, it was a degree ... regardless of how long ago it was completed.. 20... 15.... 10 years ago...
The teacher achieved a proper level of education  more suited towards working with acquiring, synthesizing, and teaching information and language.
If the teacher just had a 2 year diploma, his or her skills would be more on the technical side for completing given tasks, rather than designing English Language teaching materials or building a curriculum for a Hakwon.

That's why even in North America there is a difference between a Teacher and Teacher's assistant.

Fair enough. But, which do you think would be a better teacher for the ESL industry:

- a guy with a 20 year old degree in anthropology who had never taught anything until he arrived in Korea

or this

- a person with a 2 year diploma in Culturally Inclusive Education from Humber College in Toronto

Program Overview
The Culturally Inclusive Educator Certificate (CIEC) is designed for those interested in the field of teaching or private sector training. The courses within this certificate program provide participants with an opportunity to enhance their intercultural knowledge, communication skills, curriculum development and differentiated teaching skills essential for supporting international students in higher education.

Upon successful completion of the five courses, participants receive a certificate of completion.

This certificate has been accredited by the Society for Teaching and Learning in Higher Education (STLHE) - Educational Developers Caucus (EDC) of Canada to ensure quality in teaching and learning. For more information, please visit EDC Accreditation Information.

This certificate has also been accredited by the Staff and Educational Development Association (SEDA) of the United Kingdom in Learning Teaching and Assessing to ensure quality and alignment in teaching and learning values and philosophies.


  • hangook77
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    • September 14, 2017, 09:10:12 am
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Re: Native Teachers without College Degrees Might be Allowed to Teach at Hakwons
« Reply #15 on: September 06, 2021, 01:54:13 pm »
Fair enough. But, which do you think would be a better teacher for the ESL industry:

- a guy with a 20 year old degree in anthropology who had never taught anything until he arrived in Korea

or this

- a person with a 2 year diploma in Culturally Inclusive Education from Humber College in Toronto

Program Overview
The Culturally Inclusive Educator Certificate (CIEC) is designed for those interested in the field of teaching or private sector training. The courses within this certificate program provide participants with an opportunity to enhance their intercultural knowledge, communication skills, curriculum development and differentiated teaching skills essential for supporting international students in higher education.

Upon successful completion of the five courses, participants receive a certificate of completion.

This certificate has been accredited by the Society for Teaching and Learning in Higher Education (STLHE) - Educational Developers Caucus (EDC) of Canada to ensure quality in teaching and learning. For more information, please visit EDC Accreditation Information.

This certificate has also been accredited by the Staff and Educational Development Association (SEDA) of the United Kingdom in Learning Teaching and Assessing to ensure quality and alignment in teaching and learning values and philosophies.

Very few 2 year degree programs have that in it.  Though I hesitate to think of what this degree includes?  Gender confusion, which bathroom to use, and other nonsense? 

Anyways, most 2 year degrees are ranging from business training to plumbing, etc. 


Re: Native Teachers without College Degrees Might be Allowed to Teach at Hakwons
« Reply #16 on: September 06, 2021, 02:15:12 pm »
Fair enough. But, which do you think would be a better teacher for the ESL industry:

- a guy with a 20 year old degree in anthropology who had never taught anything until he arrived in Korea

or this

- a person with a 2 year diploma in Culturally Inclusive Education from Humber College in Toronto

Program Overview
The Culturally Inclusive Educator Certificate (CIEC) is designed for those interested in the field of teaching or private sector training. The courses within this certificate program provide participants with an opportunity to enhance their intercultural knowledge, communication skills, curriculum development and differentiated teaching skills essential for supporting international students in higher education.

Upon successful completion of the five courses, participants receive a certificate of completion.

This certificate has been accredited by the Society for Teaching and Learning in Higher Education (STLHE) - Educational Developers Caucus (EDC) of Canada to ensure quality in teaching and learning. For more information, please visit EDC Accreditation Information.

This certificate has also been accredited by the Staff and Educational Development Association (SEDA) of the United Kingdom in Learning Teaching and Assessing to ensure quality and alignment in teaching and learning values and philosophies.

Well you have a good point about timeliness and relevancy of obtained education. However,  the Culturally Inclusive Educator Certificate program (CIEC) at Humber College, it is not even a 2 year diploma.... it's an add on certification offered by the school of continuing education to further enhance one's professional credentials, and it's designed to suit the needs of those working within a multicultural city of Toronto ( where this college is located). For example, someone like myself, who already has an Honors Bachelor Degree, and a post graduate certificate in TESL could take this (CIEC), certificate course to enhance my ESL teacher credentials... and this would help tremendously in a city like Toronto, where adult ESL caters to students comming from all over the world, and including refugees, and immigrants.
This would be an asset to enhance already earned credentials.

There are other certificate of completion programs that can be used alone (not as an enhancement to a diploma or degree), such as the "emergency responder" where after completion of that course graduates can work in Ambulance dispatch ect. However for teachers, I would not want them to have just some basic diploma or certificate.

I'd rather have the guy with a 20 year degree in anthropology go back to school for a semester or two and take a 1 year TESL program from the college or the CIEC program and then hire him after he upgrades!


Re: Native Teachers without College Degrees Might be Allowed to Teach at Hakwons
« Reply #17 on: September 06, 2021, 02:21:02 pm »
Very few 2 year degree programs have that in it.  Though I hesitate to think of what this degree includes?  Gender confusion, which bathroom to use, and other nonsense? 

Anyways, most 2 year degrees are ranging from business training to plumbing, etc. 

I would say that as this program is a "certificate of completion," it is a credential enhancer program. There are teachers in ESL/ or higher education in Toronto, who already have received their Bachelor Degrees, Teaching credentials, and if they're teaching in colleges they have their master's degree, and this course is more of a career enhancer and something to help them stay relevant and up to date in their classrooms and curriculum when it comes to cultural inclusion and diversity (especially this is important in large multicultural cities such as Toronto).


Re: Native Teachers without College Degrees Might be Allowed to Teach at Hakwons
« Reply #18 on: September 07, 2021, 12:21:46 pm »
The article does not mention native teachers. It only mentions foreigners which makes me think this is aimed at foreigners here from non native English speaking countries. Maybe people married to Koreans?

Anyways more competition is good right? Minimum wage here we come!

T.C.


  • hangook77
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    • September 14, 2017, 09:10:12 am
    • Near Busan
Re: Native Teachers without College Degrees Might be Allowed to Teach at Hakwons
« Reply #19 on: September 07, 2021, 12:59:41 pm »
The article does not mention native teachers. It only mentions foreigners which makes me think this is aimed at foreigners here from non native English speaking countries. Maybe people married to Koreans?

Anyways more competition is good right? Minimum wage here we come!
The article does not mention native teachers. It only mentions foreigners which makes me think this is aimed at foreigners here from non native English speaking countries. Maybe people married to Koreans?

Anyways more competition is good right? Minimum wage here we come!

T.C.

Minimum wage is already here.  Next year 1.9 plus million won.  2.1 million won at a hakwon and for many EPIK new hires.  .