Read 10929 times

  • Lazio
  • Expert Waygook

    • 747

    • January 27, 2018, 03:56:10 pm
    • Gyeongi-do
Yet another hiccup in the vaccine rollout. Although this one is on Moderna.

https://m.koreatimes.co.kr/pages/article.asp?newsIdx=313620

"Those who are scheduled to receive second doses of the mRNA vaccines will be given them six weeks after the first dose, starting Aug. 16," Jeong said. "This measure will be applied temporarily. The four-week gap will be maintained for high school seniors and other applicants for the College Scholastic Ability Test as well as high school teachers, so there is no setback in the test schedule."

Teachers working at kindergartens and elementary and middle schools will receive their second shots after a five-week gap so they can be vaccinated ahead of the beginning of the fall semester.



  • L I
  • Waygook Lord

    • 7168

    • October 03, 2011, 01:50:58 pm
The Korean government promised a lot of first doses by the end of September. In order to fulfill that pledge (i.e. not look bad), they’ve delayed second doses. Good strategy from a health standpoint? Not sure.


Yup, my second shot got rescheduled to September 3. Found out about it yesterday. Really bummed me out. I'm trying to view this from an optimistic angle since vaccines are actually more effective with a larger interval between the first and second shots (I think not to exceed 10 weeks, and with 8 weeks being optimal?), but part of me is also afraid we'll end up in a neverending cycle of delays.

Hoping for the best, though. I just want my second shot out of the way at this point.


  • L I
  • Waygook Lord

    • 7168

    • October 03, 2011, 01:50:58 pm
For public school teachers under 60, Pfizer is what we got. The optimal wait period for that one is 21 days - three weeks.

(For AstraZeneca - what the older folks got - the optimal wait period is longer.)

Even before this happened Korea had the lowest fully vaccinated rate in the OECD, and was below the global average, which is surprising for a rich country.


  • Adel
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1810

    • January 30, 2015, 12:50:26 am
    • The Abyss
    more
For public school teachers under 60, Pfizer is what we got. The optimal wait period for that one is 21 days - three weeks.

(For AstraZeneca - what the older folks got - the optimal wait period is longer.)

Even with AstraZeneca the optimal time period is relative to the level of infection within the community and the chances of being infected. In Sydney now the health authorities of NSW are encouraging people to talk their second shot of Astra after only 4 weeks because of the recent outbreak of the Delta strain. Their is a slightly lower level of antibody production but the decreased risk of hospitalisation and death after taking the second shot is virtually identical to waiting the original 12 weeks.   


  • L I
  • Waygook Lord

    • 7168

    • October 03, 2011, 01:50:58 pm
Hmm… so do you think not delaying the second dose (of Pfizer) would have been better? Seems like it was a face saving decision to get more partially vaccinated people out there at the expense of fully vaccinated folk… to boost the numbers of people who had gotten a shot. (Young folk need the shot less.)
« Last Edit: August 10, 2021, 11:32:48 am by L I »


  • Adel
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1810

    • January 30, 2015, 12:50:26 am
    • The Abyss
    more
Hmm… so do you think not delaying the second dose (of Pfizer) would have been better?

This guy probably would have benefitted from going earlier. He survived but it was a very near miss.
Quote
Richard said out of his family, he was the fittest and strongest, cycling, running and going to the gym regularly.
https://www.abc.net.au/news/2021-08-07/covid-19-delta-victorian-outbreak-teacher-vaccination-plea/100358420
« Last Edit: August 10, 2021, 11:35:47 am by Adel »


  • L I
  • Waygook Lord

    • 7168

    • October 03, 2011, 01:50:58 pm
That’s not really answering the question.

If there are not enough vaccines, who should get the delays?


  • L I
  • Waygook Lord

    • 7168

    • October 03, 2011, 01:50:58 pm
The guy in the above link was 51.

In the case of Korea, second doses are being delayed (for mostly 50-59) so 49-17 year olds can get a first dose.


  • Adel
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1810

    • January 30, 2015, 12:50:26 am
    • The Abyss
    more
That’s not really answering the question.

If there are not enough vaccines, who should get the delays?

It's a matter of rationing a very scarce resource, getting as many first shots into as many people as possible and hoping that more supplies turn up on time for the second shot after 5 weeks. Other countries have been doing the same thing when the  Pfizer vaccine has been in short supply. Even with the first shot of Pfizer you get a fair amount of protection.

In Australia similar delays are happening with Pfizer for that age group. However there is a relatively abundant supply of Astra and people above 30 are now being encouraged to take Astra as well after consultation with their doctors regarding the very slight risk of clotting. Hesitancy has been an issue for the older age group.
« Last Edit: August 10, 2021, 11:47:39 am by Adel »


  • L I
  • Waygook Lord

    • 7168

    • October 03, 2011, 01:50:58 pm
Quote
“Richard said out of his family, he was the fittest and strongest, cycling, running and going to the gym regularly.”

That’s a surprising bit. Almost all the people - actually all from what I can think of - who got really sick were in poor health. But this guy says he wasn’t. (Says.) In the hospital picture he looks fat. In the provided picture he doesn’t. Maybe from a long time ago? But the thing is age gradually deteriorates one’s body and immunity. Healthy living slows / mitigates the inexorable decline.


For public school teachers under 60, Pfizer is what we got. The optimal wait period for that one is 21 days - three weeks.

This is what I was basing my claim on:

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2021/jul/23/pfizer-vaccine-second-dose-has-sweet-spot-after-eight-weeks-uk-scientists-say

Still early, though, info is still in flux. They're also now saying that Moderna vaccines might possibly be more effective against the Delta variants than both Pfizer and AZ, but they're still researching.


  • Adel
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1810

    • January 30, 2015, 12:50:26 am
    • The Abyss
    more
That’s a surprising bit. Almost all the people - actually all from what I can think of - who got really sick were in poor health. But this guy says he wasn’t. (Says.) In the hospital picture he looks fat. In the provided picture he doesn’t. Maybe from a long time ago? But the thing is age gradually deteriorates one’s body and immunity. Healthy living slows / mitigates the inexorable decline.

Not quite sure how you can make that judgement about the picture provided by looking at an unfortunate camera angle of his neck.
Quote
He was admitted to intensive care on the seventh day of his illness, and lost 15 kilograms of muscle mass


  • Adel
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1810

    • January 30, 2015, 12:50:26 am
    • The Abyss
    more
The CDC says, “The recommended interval between doses is 21 days for Pfizer-BioNTech.”

…but… Brits are saying longer could be better; maybe they’re right.
Again, relative to supply constraints and levels of infection within the community.


  • Adel
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1810

    • January 30, 2015, 12:50:26 am
    • The Abyss
    more
Delta is different !

https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2021/08/what-does-delta-variant-have-store-us-we-asked-coronavirus-experts

Quote
The national case count obscures the record-breaking infection rates in U.S. states with low vaccination rates such as Florida and Louisiana. In Alabama, where just 35% of the population is fully vaccinated, hospitalizations have more than doubled in the past 10 days to nearly 1700—the same number of full beds as at the end of November 2020. The difference: Back then, the doubling took 6 weeks. “The amount of time you need to be exposed to someone who has the Delta variant is much less than what it was with that ancestral strain,” says epidemiologist Russell Griffin of the University of Alabama, Birmingham (UAB). What’s more, he says, the median age of patients at the UAB hospital has fallen from 65 to 52 since January, and healthy young adults are starting to turn up in the intensive care unit.
« Last Edit: August 10, 2021, 12:13:05 pm by Adel »


  • hangook77
  • The Legend

    • 4847

    • September 14, 2017, 09:10:12 am
    • Near Busan
I thought once you got the vaccine that masks would be gone and that covid would go away and no one would ever get sick again.  Seems like these so called experts keep moving the goal posts and changing their mind.  Now they want a 3rd dose.  What will it be later, a 4th or 5th dose? 


  • Savant
  • The Legend

    • 2911

    • April 07, 2012, 11:35:31 pm
I thought once you got the vaccine that masks would be gone and that covid would go away and no one would ever get sick again.  Seems like these so called experts keep moving the goal posts and changing their mind.  Now they want a 3rd dose.  What will it be later, a 4th or 5th dose? 

You do know that viruses can mutate?


  • L I
  • Waygook Lord

    • 7168

    • October 03, 2011, 01:50:58 pm
The less people get vaccinated and the less people are healthy, the more mutations will occur.


  • hangook77
  • The Legend

    • 4847

    • September 14, 2017, 09:10:12 am
    • Near Busan
You do know that viruses can mutate?

Wouldn't these experts have known this and been able to predict this before? 


  • OnNut81
  • The Legend

    • 2669

    • April 01, 2011, 03:01:41 pm
    • Anyang
Wouldn't these experts have known this and been able to predict this before? 


Predict that the viruses would mutate? Sure. Predict how they would mutate and the resultant new variant?  You serious?