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  • hangook77
  • The Legend

    • 4129

    • September 14, 2017, 09:10:12 am
    • Near Busan
Working and living in Korea from the female perspective.
« on: August 03, 2021, 03:08:44 am »

Working and living in Korea from the female perspective.  Interesting to listen to.


https://youtu.be/mlKnZCIzSKU


  • KimDuHan
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1445

    • January 15, 2015, 11:48:59 am
    • Seoul
Re: Working and living in Korea from the female perspective.
« Reply #1 on: August 03, 2021, 03:37:14 am »
Around 60+ of all my coworkers in Korea were female both Korean and waygooks. All generally loved Korea.

Pick a crap job and get the crappy experience. Search for a good job and get a good experience. Parents will always complain and bosses will always treat you bad itís not a korean thing.

As for after work and being hit on by korean men? This happens again in every country on earth, in Korea men even get hustled by Korean women looking at Songton Sally and her girls.

Life is what you make of it. I enjoy Korea but know my life changed to much to live there and the old days are gone.



  • VanIslander
  • Moderator LVL 1

    • 2680

    • June 02, 2011, 10:12:19 am
    • Seogwipo, Jeju Island
    more
Re: Working and living in Korea from the female perspective.
« Reply #2 on: August 03, 2021, 03:40:48 am »
Gawd. Could we have even ONE female voice?


Re: Working and living in Korea from the female perspective.
« Reply #3 on: August 03, 2021, 05:58:13 am »
Couldn't get beyond 5 minutes, the 'like' count was way too high.


  • L I
  • Waygook Lord

    • 6799

    • October 03, 2011, 01:50:58 pm
Re: Working and living in Korea from the female perspective.
« Reply #4 on: August 03, 2021, 06:20:34 am »
Gawd. Could we have even ONE female voice

You mean in the thread comments? Iíd say this forum is about 10% female among those who post (or maybe closer to 5%?), so thereís a good chance itíll happen.


  • OnNut81
  • The Legend

    • 2436

    • April 01, 2011, 03:01:41 pm
    • Anyang
Re: Working and living in Korea from the female perspective.
« Reply #5 on: August 03, 2021, 09:09:49 am »
Gawd. Could we have even ONE female voice?

What?!  You wrote that in an exasperated tone after only one comment?  I'm guessing you're trying to show how woke you are.  Should've held off until you saw if it was going to be multiple postings by men.  Then you could've explained why men shouldn't be commenting.  You pulled the trigger way too early.  Virtue signaling fail. 


Re: Working and living in Korea from the female perspective.
« Reply #6 on: August 03, 2021, 09:55:30 am »
I didn't watch the video all the way through, it's too long for me and she hadn't done any editing, but, from what I've watched skipping around, her experiences are pretty much a reflection of my own, but maybe more tame. Can't say for sure because I didn't watch it from start to finish, but I've been in some really aggressive situations.

I've had to change a lot of my own mannerisms and habits in Korea because of how predatory a lot of the men are and how normalized that behavior is here. They literally work in teams with their friends and coworkers to put women into vulnerable positions. I know a lot of foreign women who left Korea specifically because of this, even though they loved Korea overall. But the men around them just kind of ruined the experience for them. A surprising number of them had been assaulted by a Korean coworker, and more than a few of them had been drugged.

Obviously, there are a lot of good, decent men in Korea, but most of them have been raised to carry very misogynistic, xenophobic, and entitled views that influence how they interact with women and, even moreso, how they interact with foreign women. They're very condescending and treat me like I'm stupid, for example, they want to appear to be the expert in the relationship even if they don't know what the **** they're talking about, they don't like to be questioned in any kind of way, women are meant to be seen not heard, that sort of thing. I've literally had men trying to explain what an umbrella was, or how I'm supposed to use a straw. If they want to date (or sleep with) me, they think trying to micromanage my life and treat me like a baby is the way to show me that they're good dating material. And they tend to make a lot of excuses for predatory men, often trying to lift the burden of guilt away from them and onto the women instead. Or deny that these men exist at all. And don't even get me started on how gross a lot of the men I see around my students are towards them. My students are between ages 12-15, and they very much look like it. Doesn't stop grown ass men from approaching them and harassing them. It's actually one of the reasons why I hate my school's security guard so much, too, he's very much a dirty old man, and there have been complaints, but they've been ignored.

Anyway, yeah, everyone has different experiences (often influenced by where you live, how you look, and personal habits), but enough foreign women experience the same problems that the majority can't see themselves ever settling down in Korea (basically the only real chance they have of that is to get married to a good Korean man, and good, compatible choices for foreign women here are too few and far between). They just don't talk about these problems with most people because too many people are quick to dismiss them.

Be that as it may, though, there are those lucky few who managed to find their niche here.
« Last Edit: September 16, 2021, 11:55:23 am by Chinguetti »


  • SPQR
  • Expert Waygook

    • 923

    • March 08, 2018, 07:04:54 pm
    • Sierra Leone
Re: Working and living in Korea from the female perspective.
« Reply #7 on: August 03, 2021, 10:56:31 am »
She's well hawt though, eh?


  • SPQR
  • Expert Waygook

    • 923

    • March 08, 2018, 07:04:54 pm
    • Sierra Leone
Re: Working and living in Korea from the female perspective.
« Reply #8 on: August 03, 2021, 12:49:35 pm »
All kidding aside, her work experiences are a serious problem in Korea. As a country
becomes more affluent there is a tendency to have fewer children. However this has
now been realized as an extreme in Korea. This country has the lowest birthrate on
the planet.

The government, mostly made up of middle-aged men, throws money at it to no
effect whatsoever. This problem needs drastic, binding and nation-wide efforts
to fix it.

1/ The public needs to be made aware of the problems facing Korean
society and the government's intention to remedy the situation. TV
and internet infomercials need to broadcast for a few years, so
that this problem is out in the open and well known.

2/ The military draft should be universal for both sexes.

3/ Age and marital status should be illegal for employers
to ask. This has to be actually enforced and rigorously punished.

4/ Quotas should be set in high level positions of government
and business. This has to be actually enforced and rigorously punished.

5/ Maternity leave should be mandatory for both the husband and wife.
The jobs should be waiting for them when they return. This has to be actually
enforced and rigorously punished.

6/ Maternity hospitals, visits and follow-ups need to be 100% free.

7/ Kindergartens and pre-schools need to be 100% free.

This will obviously cause some feathers to be ruffled.

The alternative is the eventual extinction of the Korean race.


Re: Working and living in Korea from the female perspective.
« Reply #9 on: August 03, 2021, 12:56:20 pm »
The alternative is the eventual extinction of the Korean race.
No one is going to go extinct. Populations in excess of available resources decline, then at some point there might actually be surplus, in which case people will have more kids. It's a wave not a permanent downward slope.


  • VanIslander
  • Moderator LVL 1

    • 2680

    • June 02, 2011, 10:12:19 am
    • Seogwipo, Jeju Island
    more
Re: Working and living in Korea from the female perspective.
« Reply #10 on: August 03, 2021, 01:18:57 pm »
Still all of men.


  • OnNut81
  • The Legend

    • 2436

    • April 01, 2011, 03:01:41 pm
    • Anyang
Re: Working and living in Korea from the female perspective.
« Reply #11 on: August 03, 2021, 01:24:01 pm »
Still all of men.

I'm not sure Chinguetti would appreciate that ignorant comment.  Also, could you please explain why men shouldn't be commenting here? 


Re: Working and living in Korea from the female perspective.
« Reply #12 on: August 03, 2021, 01:32:33 pm »
Still all of men.

Did you just assume their gender?


Re: Working and living in Korea from the female perspective.
« Reply #13 on: August 03, 2021, 01:52:27 pm »
Gawd. Could we have even ONE female voice?

Well everyone keeps letting a small group of right-wing creeps scare them off.


  • Sagi Keun
  • Adventurer

    • 69

    • May 10, 2018, 11:47:23 am
    • Los Angeles
Re: Working and living in Korea from the female perspective.
« Reply #14 on: August 03, 2021, 10:23:57 pm »
They're very condescending and treat me like I'm stupid, for example, they want to appear to be the expert in the relationship even if they don't know what the **** they're talking about, they don't like to be questioned in any kind of way, women are meant to be seen not heard, that sort of thing. I've literally had men trying to explain what an umbrella was, or how I'm supposed to use a straw.

of course they wouldn't know what umbrellas or straws are.. were it not for western people.

Over-compensation for a massive cultural inferiority complex.


Re: Working and living in Korea from the female perspective.
« Reply #15 on: August 03, 2021, 11:30:50 pm »
wtf is wrong with you Sagi Keun? Don't come and voice  your hatred here.
Really!, let women tell their stories without another sorry boy venting insecurities about korea.
What an F wit you are, you bored troll.


Re: Working and living in Korea from the female perspective.
« Reply #16 on: August 04, 2021, 12:03:10 pm »
Dont treat women like pieces of meat

But here they treat women like samgyupsal :(


Re: Working and living in Korea from the female perspective.
« Reply #17 on: August 04, 2021, 12:33:08 pm »
of course they wouldn't know what umbrellas or straws are.. were it not for western people.

Over-compensation for a massive cultural inferiority complex.
I love how Sagi Keun thinks in his mind because some westerner invented something and he happens to also be western, that he is any way, shape or form connected to that.

I also love how he doesn't realize that much of those accomplishments are due to a Middle Eastern tribe that Westerners victimized for 2000 years. Not to mention some other Middle Easterners that kept much of science and learning afloat for about 600 years while the Westerners were rolling around in filth. Nor all the shit that came from various Indian and Chinese sources.

Also, nice coincidence, today's feature Wikipedia article is on Cai Lun, the person who invented modern paper.  Sagi Keun probably wouldn't know what reading or writing was if it wasn't for some Chinese guy. Over-compensation for a massive-inferiority complex. (His inferiority being the fact that he's a mediocre zilch yet thinks he's some massive pillar of intellect, culture and insight, all while tens of thousands of locals exceed him in status, accomplishments, and wealth)
« Last Edit: August 04, 2021, 12:56:46 pm by Mr.DeMartino »


Re: Working and living in Korea from the female perspective.
« Reply #18 on: August 04, 2021, 12:44:54 pm »
I love how Sagi Keun thinks in his mind because some westerner invented something and he happens to also be western, that he is any way, shape or form connected to that.

I also love how he doesn't realize that much of those accomplishments are due to a Middle Eastern tribe that Westerners victimized for 2000 years. Not to mention some other Middle Easterners that kept much of science and learning afloat for about 600 years while the Westerners were rolling around in filth. Nor all the shit that came from various Indian and Chinese sources.

Do you really love it? The world needs more genuine love. :)))))))))))


Re: Working and living in Korea from the female perspective.
« Reply #19 on: August 04, 2021, 12:47:48 pm »
Do you really love it? The world needs more genuine love. :)))))))))))
Ayyyy all you need is love, amiright?