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The Olympics
« on: July 18, 2021, 11:20:56 am »
Silliness and immaturity. I remember asking a class of high school boys who their hero was and without exception every one of them said Yi Sun Shin. This should raise the national ire towards the Japanese again.

Politics and sport should not mix. These Olympics should have been cancelled anyway.

South Korea removes controversial banners from Tokyo Olympic village

July 17, 2021

South Korea’s Olympic committee said Saturday it removed banners at the Olympic athletes’ village in Tokyo that referred to a 16th-century war between Korea and Japan after the International Olympic Committee ruled they were provocative.

In agreeing to take down the banners, the South Koreans said they received a promise from the IOC that the displaying of the Japanese “rising sun” flag will be banned at stadiums and other Olympic venues. The flag, portraying a red sun with 16 rays extending outward, is resented by many people in South Korea and other parts of Asia who see it as a symbol of Japan’s wartime past.

The South Korean banners, which drew protests from some Japanese far-right groups, had been hung at the balconies of South Korean athletes’ rooms and collectively spelled out a message that read: “I still have the support of 50 million Korean people.”


This borrowed from the famous words of 16th-century Korean naval admiral Yi Sun-sin, who according to historical lore told King Seonjo of Korea’s Joseon Kingdom “I still have 12 battleships left” before pulling off a crucial victory against a larger Japanese fleet during the 1592-1598 Japanese invasions of Korea.

South Korea’s Olympic Committee said it was told by the IOC that the banners invoked images of war and went against Rule 50 of the Olympic Charter, which says “no kind of demonstration or political, religious or racial propaganda is permitted in any Olympic sites, venues or other areas.”

The committee said it agreed to remove the banners after the IOC promised to also apply the same rules to the rising sun flags and ban them at all Olympic venues.

“Under the agreement, the committee will not raise any further debate to allow athletes to fully focus on competition, while the IOC will ban the displaying of the rising sun flag at all Olympic venues so that no political problems would arise,” the South Korean committee said in a statement.

Toshiro Muto, the CEO of Tokyo’s organizing committee, said the IOC thought the South Korean banners were “not appropriate” and asked them to be taken down.

Seiko Hashimoto, president of the organizing committee, acknowledged there “may be many ways of thinking” over the issue.

“If the message is regarded as political, it goes against the message of the Olympics and the Paralympics to bring the world together as one,” she said.


South Korea in 2019 had first formally asked the IOC to ban the rising sun flag at the Olympics, comparing it to the Nazi swastika. South Korean Olympic officials then said Tokyo’s organizing committee rejected their demands for the flag to be banned, saying it was widely used in Japan and was not considered a political statement.


Many South Koreans still harbor animosity over Japan’s 1910-1945 colonial rule of the Korean Peninsula, and the countries have seen their relations sink to new post-war lows in recent years with disputes over history, trade and military cooperation.

The countries have been trying to improve relations since the inauguration of U.S. President Joe Biden, who has called for stronger three-way cooperation with the traditional U.S. allies in the face of the North Korean nuclear threats and challenges posed by China. But progress has been slow.

South Korea’s Foreign Ministry on Saturday summoned Japanese Ambassador Koichi Aiboshi to protest remarks made by another senior Japanese diplomat who, according to a local broadcaster, used lewd language to ridicule South Korean President Moon Jae-in’s efforts to improve bilateral ties while meeting with its reporters.

The countries had been discussing the possibility of Moon visiting Tokyo to participate in the Olympics’ opening ceremony and having talks with Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga over improving relations.

AP writer Yuri Kageyama contributed to the story from Tokyo.

© 2021 The Canadian Press


  • VanIslander
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Re: The Olympics
« Reply #1 on: July 18, 2021, 01:47:02 pm »
I teach my students about the first Korean gold medal winner in marathoner Sohn Kee-chung (Son Gi-jeong).

In 1936 at the Berlin Games, Sohn stepped away from the Japanese flag (when photos were taken), in protest of that nation's attempt to claim his victory and to protest Japanese occupation (attempted colonization) of the Korean peninsula.


Re: The Olympics
« Reply #2 on: July 18, 2021, 02:27:38 pm »
I teach my students about Apolo Ohno's brilliance during the 2002 Winter Olympics. The parents love that I involve speed skating into the lesson, which makes it more interesting for the students.

Additionally, the topic leads to some really civil conversations at dinner with my Korean wife, though for some reason the iced tea she makes for me afterwards always tastes a bit peculiar...
Join the WhenInRome Fan Club!
Shout out to Mr. DeMartino... the first member. Thank you my son! ;)


Re: The Olympics
« Reply #3 on: July 18, 2021, 02:38:57 pm »
I really enjoyed the Korean obsession with "Foreigners Behaving Badly" at the Pyeongchang Olympics. Good to see South Korea is stepping up to join in this time.


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Re: The Olympics
« Reply #4 on: July 18, 2021, 04:07:32 pm »
I taught about Kim Yu na. I like figure skating...watching anyway...women...

Never quite got the bragging that went on about the Koreans archery success because they eat with metal chopsticks which strengthened their fingers.


  • VanIslander
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Re: The Olympics
« Reply #5 on: July 18, 2021, 04:30:55 pm »
Korean women in team archery comp have won the Gold medal every single time since 1988.

A Korean woman has won Gold in 8 of the last 9 Olympics in individual archery competition.

They own the sport.

Please teach your Korean students the word "archery", as in arch bridge (draw on board), arch of foot (point or tap) and if it is a higher-level class: architect, because designing ARCH bridges predated the modern role of ARCHitects.
« Last Edit: July 18, 2021, 04:34:36 pm by VanIslander »


Re: The Olympics
« Reply #6 on: July 18, 2021, 06:36:09 pm »
I really enjoyed the Korean obsession with "Foreigners Behaving Badly" at the Pyeongchang Olympics. Good to see South Korea is stepping up to join in this time.
Dude, everyone here was here in 2018. The only thing Koreans and anyone else was obsessed over were four girls with brooms on ice and Korea flopping in short track due to the big scandal.

You and a few others were obsessed with scouring the web looking for any article that could be used to promote your "Koreans hate foreigners" narrative while ignoring any other article that contradicted that in an effort to present a one-sided view of the situation.


Re: The Olympics
« Reply #7 on: July 18, 2021, 06:46:27 pm »
I teach my students about the first Korean gold medal winner in marathoner Sohn Kee-chung (Son Gi-jeong).

In 1936 at the Berlin Games, Sohn stepped away from the Japanese flag (when photos were taken), in protest of that nation's attempt to claim his victory and to protest Japanese occupation (attempted colonization) of the Korean peninsula.
Nice.

Yeah, I know many here are going to reflexively oppose Korea on this and automatically side with the "progressive" Japanese against the jingoistic Koreans, but if the games were in Rome and Italy was being asked not to fly the same flag they flew under Mussolini and the Italians tried to claim it was "not political" and the Ethiopians decided to put up a banner with a modified quote from Haile Selassie's speech at the League of Nations, I don't think anyone in their right mind would think the Italians the aggrieved party and the Ethiopians the one violating the Olympics tradition of no politics.

Seriously, the people thinking Korea is being an ass in all of this really need to step back and wonder if they themselves haven't lost some perspective.
« Last Edit: July 19, 2021, 11:20:38 am by Mr.DeMartino »


Re: The Olympics
« Reply #8 on: July 18, 2021, 06:56:00 pm »
Silliness and immaturity. I remember asking a class of high school boys who their hero was and without exception every one of them said Yi Sun Shin.
Well, if there IS a Korean person, that guy pretty much should be it. Dude was at the Gandhi-level for his nation in terms of being so far above and beyond. Militarily, he objectively is up there with the greatest figures of all time, around the world. When you add in the horrible treatment he received and the constant intrigues against him, it elevates him even further. Nelson dominates British celebrations and is rightfully legendary, but even he wasn't constantly punished and even tortured at the hands of the government whose people he was trying to save only for him to still take up arms to protect that country because he was fighting for the people.

No one would bitch about an Indian saying Gandhi. An Ethiopian saying Selassie. A Quebecoise saying Richard. A Haitian saying L'Ouverture, an Ecuadorean saying Simon Bolivar.

Like, I think you're being a bit harsh. Just because YOU don't really think Yi-Soon Shin is important because you grew up in a completely different country and culture, doesn't mean he wasn't important to their country. He pretty much ensured their independence and is one of the biggest moral leaders the country has ever had.
« Last Edit: July 18, 2021, 06:59:36 pm by Mr.DeMartino »


  • Mr C
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Re: The Olympics
« Reply #9 on: July 18, 2021, 10:53:18 pm »
Well, if there IS a Korean person, that guy pretty much should be it. Dude was at the Gandhi-level for his nation in terms of being so far above and beyond. Militarily, he objectively is up there with the greatest figures of all time, around the world. When you add in the horrible treatment he received and the constant intrigues against him, it elevates him even further. Nelson dominates British celebrations and is rightfully legendary, but even he wasn't constantly punished and even tortured at the hands of the government whose people he was trying to save only for him to still take up arms to protect that country because he was fighting for the people.

No one would bitch about an Indian saying Gandhi. An Ethiopian saying Selassie. A Quebecoise saying Richard. A Haitian saying L'Ouverture, an Ecuadorean saying Simon Bolivar.

Like, I think you're being a bit harsh. Just because YOU don't really think Yi-Soon Shin is important because you grew up in a completely different country and culture, doesn't mean he wasn't important to their country. He pretty much ensured their independence and is one of the biggest moral leaders the country has ever had.

George Washington is the $hit!

DJT:  “I think it would be hard if George Washington came back from the dead and he chose Abraham Lincoln as his vice-president, I think it would have been very hard for them to beat me.” 


  • VanIslander
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Re: The Olympics
« Reply #10 on: July 18, 2021, 11:39:17 pm »
I teach my students about Apolo Ohno's brilliance during the 2002 Winter Olympics.
If you had taught here 2002-2010 or so, you would have been roasted or fired. Certainly, you would lose the room.

But in 2021 it ain't as incendiary?
« Last Edit: July 18, 2021, 11:41:24 pm by VanIslander »


  • hangook77
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Re: The Olympics
« Reply #11 on: July 19, 2021, 07:52:10 am »
If you had taught here 2002-2010 or so, you would have been roasted or fired. Certainly, you would lose the room.

But in 2021 it ain't as incendiary?

That's because the young people nowadays aren't into doing what their ajossi tells them.  The xenophobia and outsider hatred and loser at anti English spectrum didn't help any of them get good jobs.  So, they have checked out on life and have become more Conservative lately supporting things like free speech and local mayoral candidates. 


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Re: The Olympics
« Reply #12 on: July 19, 2021, 08:17:13 am »
That's because the young people nowadays aren't into doing what their ajossi tells them.  The xenophobia and outsider hatred and loser at anti English spectrum didn't help any of them get good jobs.  So, they have checked out on life and have become more Conservative lately supporting things like free speech and local mayoral candidates. 
Fight the power!


  • hangook77
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Re: The Olympics
« Reply #13 on: July 19, 2021, 08:27:10 am »
Fight the power!

More power to ya!!!


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Re: The Olympics
« Reply #14 on: July 19, 2021, 08:59:52 am »
Well, if there IS a Korean person, that guy pretty much should be it. Dude was at the Gandhi-level for his nation in terms of being so far above and beyond. Militarily, he objectively is up there with the greatest figures of all time, around the world. When you add in the horrible treatment he received and the constant intrigues against him, it elevates him even further. Nelson dominates British celebrations and is rightfully legendary, but even he wasn't constantly punished and even tortured at the hands of the government whose people he was trying to save only for him to still take up arms to protect that country because he was fighting for the people.

No one would bitch about an Indian saying Gandhi. An Ethiopian saying Selassie. A Quebecoise saying Richard. A Haitian saying L'Ouverture, an Ecuadorean saying Simon Bolivar.

Like, I think you're being a bit harsh. Just because YOU don't really think Yi-Soon Shin is important because you grew up in a completely different country and culture, doesn't mean he wasn't important to their country. He pretty much ensured their independence and is one of the biggest moral leaders the country has ever had.

Apologist sentiments aside, you completely missed my point. I don't give a fig about a 500 year dead navy guy. The point was my high school boys class unanimously chose him as their hero.

Tell me one other group of high school boys from another country who would unanimously choose a 500 year dead military guy as their hero. Just one.

And why Yi Sun shin? Cuz he beat the big bad Japanese. That's why. Get over it Mr. Kim.


Re: The Olympics
« Reply #15 on: July 19, 2021, 11:07:37 am »
Tell me one other group of high school boys from another country who would unanimously choose a 500 year dead military guy as their hero. Just one.

And why Yi Sun shin? Cuz he beat the big bad Japanese. That's why. Get over it Mr. Kim.
Arab world- Saladin

He didn't just beat the Japanese, he likely saved Korea from complete conquest and enabled its continued existence. With increased awareness of his exploits in the Western world, his star has risen considerably to the point where many consider him the greatest admiral in human history.

- He was an autodidact. He had no formal naval training.
- He was a technological innovator
- His war record was astounding- he destroyed dozens of ships in battle after battle while losing none.
- Despite regular intrigues against him, demotions, and outright torture,  he still chose to serve his nation to protect the people
- The moral courage to believe he could still protect Korea with only 13 ships
- The ability to pull it off with those 13 ships in the naval version of Thermopalye. A victory if done by Nelson, would have eclipsed Trafalgar and made Nelson a demi-god in the eyes of the English people. Think if Churchill's 'Few' had only been 13 planes saving England from the Luftwaffe.
- His concern for the people of Korea. He was constantly concerned about reprisals against peasants and that factored into his decisions, whereas others wouldn't give a fig.
- Him giving the Supreme Sacrifice in his final battle.

Before you rip your students, maybe as a teacher, you should learn about the guy first. He didn't just beat the big bad Japanese. Anyone with an eye for history, military history in particular, knows he was an exceptional military leader and worthy of the legendary status he enjoys.

Frankly, you sound a bit ignorant and closed-minded with your dismissal.


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Re: The Olympics
« Reply #16 on: July 19, 2021, 11:20:52 am »
Arab world- Saladin

He didn't just beat the Japanese, he likely saved Korea from complete conquest and enabled its continued existence. With increased awareness of his exploits in the Western world, his star has risen considerably to the point where many consider him the greatest admiral in human history.

- He was an autodidact. He had no formal naval training.
- He was a technological innovator
- His war record was astounding- he destroyed dozens of ships in battle after battle while losing none.
- Despite regular intrigues against him, demotions, and outright torture,  he still chose to serve his nation to protect the people
- The moral courage to believe he could still protect Korea with only 13 ships
- The ability to pull it off with those 13 ships in the naval version of Thermopalye. A victory if done by Nelson, would have eclipsed Trafalgar and made Nelson a demi-god in the eyes of the English people. Think if Churchill's 'Few' had only been 13 planes saving England from the Luftwaffe.
- His concern for the people of Korea. He was constantly concerned about reprisals against peasants and that factored into his decisions, whereas others wouldn't give a fig.
- Him giving the Supreme Sacrifice in his final battle.

Before you rip your students, maybe as a teacher, you should learn about the guy first. He didn't just beat the big bad Japanese. Anyone with an eye for history, military history in particular, knows he was an exceptional military leader and worthy of the legendary status he enjoys.

Frankly, you sound a bit ignorant and closed-minded with your dismissal.

And you sound like a drinker of Kool-Aid. Which flavour was it by the way. Also, where did you put the tattoo of Shin on your body? I'm betting your heart. It's on your heart, right? Yeah, it's gotta be the heart. Do you kiss the picture of Shin that hangs over your bed good night before you go to sleep?


  • 745sticky
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Re: The Olympics
« Reply #17 on: July 19, 2021, 11:21:35 am »
this "discourse" (and i use the word lightly) has taken a turn for the idiotic


  • OnNut81
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Re: The Olympics
« Reply #18 on: July 19, 2021, 11:33:15 am »
I have to agree with Martini here.  Admiral Yi is extremely well known outside of Korea.  All of my nephews back in the west always fight over who gets to be Admiral Yi when they go to the pool.  When I hear some Koreans go on about the exploits of Admiral Yi Sun-Sin I get this song suddenly start playing in the back of my mind while they drone on. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bWcASV2sey0



  • Adel
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Re: The Olympics
« Reply #19 on: July 19, 2021, 11:35:24 am »
And you sound like a drinker of Kool-Aid. Which flavour was it by the way.
As an astute follower of Marti's comedy, I believe his preferred flavour of Kool-Aid to be grape. Not grape flavour per-se but a purple coloured Kool-Aid.