Read 1146 times

  • Sagi Keun
  • Adventurer

    • 65

    • May 10, 2018, 11:47:23 am
    • Los Angeles
cnbc promotes teaching in Korea.
« on: July 17, 2021, 03:12:15 pm »

No wonder the job market keeps getting swamped here when big media keeps hyping ESL in Korea to the masses.


How a 26-year-old expat in Seoul, South Korea lives on $24,000 a year
Published Thu, Jul 15 2021

Not everyone can say they’re living out their childhood dream, but Michaela Cricchio can.

These days, Cricchio, 26, calls Seoul, South Korea, home. She wakes up every morning in an apartment in the city, hops on the subway and gets to school to teach English to elementary school students. On the weekends, she meets up with other expat friends to explore Seoul’s cafes, restaurants, art galleries and city life.

“Living abroad is great because you get to experience a whole new culture, customs, food, meet incredible people,” Cricchio tells CNBC Make It. “I’ve created such strong friendships here. I’ve seen so many amazing things that I would have never been exposed to if I decided to stay home.”

A typical Saturday almost always involves a trip to a cafe for hand-crafted drinks, pastries and brunch. “I do a lot of cafe hopping because coffee culture is very big here,” Cricchio says. A trendy spot she likes, Seoulism, is known for its rooftop views of the city.

https://www.cnbc.com/2021/07/15/how-a-26-year-old-expat-in-seoul-south-korea-lives-on-24000-dollars-a-year.html



Re: cnbc promotes teaching in Korea.
« Reply #1 on: July 17, 2021, 06:08:33 pm »
What a great lifestyle! Travel, savings, and friendship. Makes me want to get a Hagwon job and live the dream in Korea.


Re: cnbc promotes teaching in Korea.
« Reply #2 on: July 17, 2021, 07:29:11 pm »
She spends 60-70 dollars a month travelling round Korea? That's like less than a one way ticket from Seoul to Busan on the KTX or one night in a cheap hotel.  I'm guessing that sum maybe doesn't include accommodation, entertainment, or meals, just literally the travelling part, on buses or cheap trains - which is a bit disingenuous. 


  • L I
  • Waygook Lord

    • 6781

    • October 03, 2011, 01:50:58 pm
Re: cnbc promotes teaching in Korea.
« Reply #3 on: July 17, 2021, 07:44:32 pm »
“She chose to teach in South Korea because she heard the cost of living there was very low.”
___________________ ___________________ _______________

It’s somewhat low, but prices are rising.


  • Mr C
  • The Legend

    • 2866

    • October 17, 2012, 03:00:40 pm
    • Seoul
Re: cnbc promotes teaching in Korea.
« Reply #4 on: July 17, 2021, 11:05:10 pm »
No wonder the job market keeps getting swamped here when big media keeps hyping ESL in Korea to the masses.


How a 26-year-old expat in Seoul, South Korea lives on $24,000 a year
Published Thu, Jul 15 2021

Not everyone can say they’re living out their childhood dream, but Michaela Cricchio can.

These days, Cricchio, 26, calls Seoul, South Korea, home. She wakes up every morning in an apartment in the city, hops on the subway and gets to school to teach English to elementary school students. On the weekends, she meets up with other expat friends to explore Seoul’s cafes, restaurants, art galleries and city life.

“Living abroad is great because you get to experience a whole new culture, customs, food, meet incredible people,” Cricchio tells CNBC Make It. “I’ve created such strong friendships here. I’ve seen so many amazing things that I would have never been exposed to if I decided to stay home.”

A typical Saturday almost always involves a trip to a cafe for hand-crafted drinks, pastries and brunch. “I do a lot of cafe hopping because coffee culture is very big here,” Cricchio says. A trendy spot she likes, Seoulism, is known for its rooftop views of the city.

https://www.cnbc.com/2021/07/15/how-a-26-year-old-expat-in-seoul-south-korea-lives-on-24000-dollars-a-year.html



I didn't read the article, but what you've posted here doesn't sound completely off-base.  Coffee culture is pretty big here ...

I make a lot more than that but lockdown aside, it sounds reasonable, doesn't it?


  • Sagi Keun
  • Adventurer

    • 65

    • May 10, 2018, 11:47:23 am
    • Los Angeles
Re: cnbc promotes teaching in Korea.
« Reply #5 on: July 17, 2021, 11:15:28 pm »
I didn't read the article, but what you've posted here doesn't sound completely off-base.  Coffee culture is pretty big here ...

Going to coffee shops is hardly a huge different culture that you'd travel to the other side of the world for, you can do that at home.

This is another example of idealizing Korea which is what you often see in the western media.

Because Korea is still a fairly blank slate to the rest of the world, it invariably gets presented as some sort of perfect paradise.


  • Mr C
  • The Legend

    • 2866

    • October 17, 2012, 03:00:40 pm
    • Seoul
Re: cnbc promotes teaching in Korea.
« Reply #6 on: July 18, 2021, 12:12:41 am »
Going to coffee shops is hardly a huge different culture that you'd travel to the other side of the world for, you can do that at home.

This is another example of idealizing Korea which is what you often see in the western media.

Because Korea is still a fairly blank slate to the rest of the world, it invariably gets presented as some sort of perfect paradise.

Okay.  Was there anything false in what you presented?  I'm really not getting the point.  “Living abroad is great because you get to experience a whole new culture, customs, food, meet incredible people,” strikes me as rather banal, but true.  I myself have created a few strong friendships here. 

Before I came to Korea, I found a lot of things that told me South Korea is not a perfect paradise, so I'm not sure "invariably" is the right word. 


  • KimDuHan
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1445

    • January 15, 2015, 11:48:59 am
    • Seoul
Re: cnbc promotes teaching in Korea.
« Reply #7 on: July 18, 2021, 07:43:24 am »
Kpop is what’s bringing people here!

People will teach for pennies on the dollar, living in Seoul is for prestige not saving these days. The majority of teachers in Korea now are chasing the YouTube reviewer dream and not actually concerned about teaching. Everyone wants to be famous and live off YouTube or twitch. Personally I know beg teachers who stream multiple times a week asking for money.

No one is saving on $26,000 a year


Re: cnbc promotes teaching in Korea.
« Reply #8 on: July 18, 2021, 07:08:19 pm »
Going to coffee shops is hardly a huge different culture that you'd travel to the other side of the world for, you can do that at home.
Depends on where she's from. If she's from some small town in America or Canada than "coffee culture" often means Fran serving Folgers from the coffee maker at the local diner or four guys in trucker hats at Tim Horton's. Sure at college there might have been 1-2 cafes on campus, but if it was an equally small and sleep college town, then yeah, Seoul would look like something completely different.

Before I came to Korea, I found a lot of things that told me South Korea is not a perfect paradise, so I'm not sure "invariably" is the right word. 
Quiet you, what with your reading of the fine print, being mature about what was involved in a move across the world and into a different culture, and doing your due diligence in researching things.

No, the reason people are angry and bitter here is because they were all lied to with promises of unicorns by recruiters and a complicit western media and that the natives failed to recognize their genius. Not that they didn't take any kind of responsibility or that they made questionable choices. Not at all!


  • hangook77
  • The Legend

    • 4057

    • September 14, 2017, 09:10:12 am
    • Near Busan
Re: cnbc promotes teaching in Korea.
« Reply #9 on: July 19, 2021, 07:37:11 am »
This was already discussioned on some of the expat Facebook groups, including by many young teachers who tore it apart.  First of all she only had 16 grand in debt.  Many have double or triple that amount.  (I had nearly 50K, but 2.1 for me at the time was about 3 million in today's money.)  She also worked a cruise ship job before and paid a good chunk of it off.  So, lets say she has 0 to 5000 dollars of student loan, then a low paying hakwon job can get by.  But if you have 30 to 60k of student loans that low pay will trap you for years scraping by.  A lot of younger teachers on the Facebook groups seemed to share this sentiment and if anything seemed annoyed that Korea was marketed to them based on outdated info (IE cost of living high now and salaries still low). 


Re: cnbc promotes teaching in Korea.
« Reply #10 on: July 19, 2021, 09:28:55 am »
A typical Saturday almost always involves a trip to a cafe for hand-crafted drinks, pastries and brunch. “I do a lot of cafe hopping because coffee culture is very big here,” Cricchio says. A trendy spot she likes, Seoulism, is known for its rooftop views of the city.

Spending all your free time sitting in coffee shops so you can chat about coffee shops you went to or are planning to go to? Sounds like an incredibly dull, bland and generic 20 something.


  • hangook77
  • The Legend

    • 4057

    • September 14, 2017, 09:10:12 am
    • Near Busan
Re: cnbc promotes teaching in Korea.
« Reply #11 on: July 19, 2021, 11:45:25 am »
Spending all your free time sitting in coffee shops so you can chat about coffee shops you went to or are planning to go to? Sounds like an incredibly dull, bland and generic 20 something.


She's obviously a rich kid who doesn't need the money and can blow her meagre salary here each month.  Very little need for remittance and saving for her. 


  • Sagi Keun
  • Adventurer

    • 65

    • May 10, 2018, 11:47:23 am
    • Los Angeles
Re: cnbc promotes teaching in Korea.
« Reply #12 on: July 19, 2021, 11:55:30 am »
Spending all your free time sitting in coffee shops so you can chat about coffee shops you went to or are planning to go to? Sounds like an incredibly dull, bland and generic 20 something.


Or taking selfies in front of the Seoul sign.  Its all just artificial experiences. Korea destroyed a lot of its natural countryside and replaced it with artificial attractions (buildings, theme parks). It takes an impoverished mind to be easily impressed by artificial things.


  • 745sticky
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1646

    • March 26, 2020, 01:52:57 pm
    • Korea
Re: cnbc promotes teaching in Korea.
« Reply #13 on: July 19, 2021, 12:26:25 pm »
No one is saving on $26,000 a year

definitely not if theyre in Seoul lol


Re: cnbc promotes teaching in Korea.
« Reply #14 on: July 19, 2021, 02:08:55 pm »
Well...... you never know what she is really doing ....She could have multiple k-pop sugar daddies lined up? With social apps these days, she might be going out every weekend on another man's dollar! So that way she is still saving all of her month's salary... since she could very well be spending somebody else's, a life style that cnbc is not being told about or is able to promote.



  • hangook77
  • The Legend

    • 4057

    • September 14, 2017, 09:10:12 am
    • Near Busan
Re: cnbc promotes teaching in Korea.
« Reply #15 on: July 20, 2021, 09:41:35 am »
Well...... you never know what she is really doing ....She could have multiple k-pop sugar daddies lined up? With social apps these days, she might be going out every weekend on another man's dollar! So that way she is still saving all of her month's salary... since she could very well be spending somebody else's, a life style that cnbc is not being told about or is able to promote.



Well, that has changed.  A few western women would try dating a Korean guy.  But most of them weren't into them at all.  Much different now not that I personally care about any race dating.  Though in fairness, I think many K guys behave differently now than 10 or so years back.  So, there's that.  Also, more familiarity with western culture and time spent living abroad amongst younger Koreans.  The cultural gap is much much smaller than it use to be. 


  • Sagi Keun
  • Adventurer

    • 65

    • May 10, 2018, 11:47:23 am
    • Los Angeles
Re: cnbc promotes teaching in Korea.
« Reply #16 on: July 21, 2021, 01:42:46 am »
The cultural gap is much much smaller than it use to be. 

It is indeed thankfully.

Don't see that many Korean guys beating up women in dark alleys anymore or dragging them into cars by the hair.


  • hangook77
  • The Legend

    • 4057

    • September 14, 2017, 09:10:12 am
    • Near Busan
Re: cnbc promotes teaching in Korea.
« Reply #17 on: July 21, 2021, 12:55:33 pm »
It is indeed thankfully.

Don't see that many Korean guys beating up women in dark alleys anymore or dragging them into cars by the hair.
[/qu
It is indeed thankfully.

Don't see that many Korean guys beating up women in dark alleys anymore or dragging them into cars by the hair.

That is so true.