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  • Kyndo
  • Moderator LVL 1

    • I am a geek!!

    • March 03, 2011, 09:45:24 am
    • Gyeongsangbuk-do
Re: Nationalism in children
« Reply #260 on: July 12, 2021, 12:17:10 pm »
Is the egg-roll debate bleeding over into other threads now?  :huh:


  • Mr C
  • The Legend

    • 2948

    • October 17, 2012, 03:00:40 pm
    • Seoul
Re: Nationalism in children
« Reply #261 on: July 12, 2021, 01:34:20 pm »
Is the egg-roll debate bleeding over into other threads now?  :huh:

It started here, then DMT opened a new thread w a poll.

And there is no debate.  There are, though, a couple of people with their fingers in their ears repeating, "la-la-la-egg-roll-equals-spring-roll-la-la-la."


  • Kyndo
  • Moderator LVL 1

    • I am a geek!!

    • March 03, 2011, 09:45:24 am
    • Gyeongsangbuk-do
Re: Nationalism in children
« Reply #262 on: July 12, 2021, 01:45:22 pm »
Still better than a lot of those political threads, though.


  • gogators!
  • Waygook Lord

    • 5075

    • March 16, 2016, 04:35:48 pm
    • Seoul
Re: Nationalism in children
« Reply #263 on: July 12, 2021, 10:04:32 pm »
Everytime I feel the urge to mock those redneck Yankee tailgate parties, I remember how back in highschool we would use a tarp to turn the bed of a pickup into a hot-tub.
Also, car torching parties out in the bush.  :-[
Redneck Yankees
Notice how you aren't arguing with the substance of the claim, but instead with the style? I accept your admission that Bulgogi burgers are not American food, and are not consumed in America to any significant degree, just like General Tso's Chicken is not Chinese food and not consumed in China to any significant degree.


I've posted nothing about bulgogi hamburgers not General Tso and his chicken.

You don't seem to be quite with it. Maybe you shouldn't have skipped those court-ordered AA meetings.


Re: Nationalism in children
« Reply #264 on: July 13, 2021, 06:50:44 am »
“Another interesting observation is that they tend to take new information and shape it to fit their stereotypes…”

Sure, this is a thing. The Japan bias is legendary, and they also do this with China. I dare you to even utter the word China, then wait for “they are the corona people” and “bat soup” even though it’s a statistical fact that Americans are the corona people; China has had essentially no corona this entire time. They simply can’t process that data. And they love to portray Chinese as “dirty,” even though China at this point is more advanced than Korea, and light years ahead of decaying America. Speaking of which they also have many delusional-positive views of America. Of course these kids have never been to China or America, so it must be media/parent spread.


  • L I
  • Waygook Lord

    • 6855

    • October 03, 2011, 01:50:58 pm
Re: Nationalism in children
« Reply #265 on: July 13, 2021, 07:14:54 am »
Biggest companies in the world top ten:

Apple (United States)   
Microsoft (United States)   
Saudi Aramco (Saudi Arabia)   
Amazon (United States)   
Alphabet (United States)   
Facebook (United States)   
Tencent Holdings (China)   
Tesla (United States)   
Alibaba Group (China)   
Berkshire Hathaway (United States)   
___________________ __________________


No Canada, UK, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, or South Korea on that list. The United States is completely dominating. So how are they “light years”  behind and “decaying”? Looks like it is you who are the delusional one.


  • Kyndo
  • Moderator LVL 1

    • I am a geek!!

    • March 03, 2011, 09:45:24 am
    • Gyeongsangbuk-do
Re: Nationalism in children
« Reply #266 on: July 13, 2021, 07:25:29 am »
Judging a countries well-being by measuring the size of their biggest corporations is like measuring the health of a human by measuring the length of their biggest tapeworms.

Huge corporations  like those on the list are parasites, and often generate very little in the way of taxes for their host countries.

That same company broken into pieces will employ more people, generate more tax revenue, and contribute a little bit less to the modern issue of ridiculous wage inequality.


  • CO2
  • Waygook Lord

    • 7372

    • March 02, 2015, 03:41:14 pm
    • Uiwang
Re: Nationalism in children
« Reply #267 on: July 13, 2021, 07:40:32 am »
Yeah, but Kyndo, if the world just had one big company, that would mean that everyone would get to work there.

Look at the big picture. We could eradicate unemployment.


  • 745sticky
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1730

    • March 26, 2020, 01:52:57 pm
    • Korea
Re: Nationalism in children
« Reply #268 on: July 13, 2021, 07:44:15 am »
China has had essentially no corona this entire time.

if you trust their statistics, yes. not saying they necessarily have had more than the states, but i'm unwilling to believe that anything is as rosy as pictured by the ccp.


  • L I
  • Waygook Lord

    • 6855

    • October 03, 2011, 01:50:58 pm
Re: Nationalism in children
« Reply #269 on: July 13, 2021, 07:52:46 am »
Why would there be just one company? In free market democratic capitalism the cream of the crop rises to the top. Consumers vote with their dollars.

IPhones rock!

Apple: first smart phone.

Good invention; I’m using one now.


  • Kayos
  • The Legend

    • 2222

    • March 31, 2016, 07:13:57 pm
    • NZ
Re: Nationalism in children
« Reply #270 on: July 13, 2021, 08:02:46 am »
Sure, this is a thing. The Japan bias is legendary, and they also do this with China. I dare you to even utter the word China, then wait for “they are the corona people” and “bat soup” even though it’s a statistical fact that Americans are the corona people; China has had essentially no corona this entire time. They simply can’t process that data. And they love to portray Chinese as “dirty,” even though China at this point is more advanced than Korea, and light years ahead of decaying America. Speaking of which they also have many delusional-positive views of America. Of course these kids have never been to China or America, so it must be media/parent spread.

Both Japan and China were skewering their results though. Japan set such crazy standards to even be able to get a covid test, that covid was pretty much out of their system by the time people were able to get tested. And China was found out to be hiding a lot of numbers early on too. For accurate covid case numbers, I wouldn't trust China or Japan for that info.


  • Kayos
  • The Legend

    • 2222

    • March 31, 2016, 07:13:57 pm
    • NZ
Re: Nationalism in children
« Reply #271 on: July 13, 2021, 08:03:52 am »
Why would there be just one company? In free market democratic capitalism the cream of the crop rises to the top. Consumers vote with their dollars.

IPhones rock!

Apple: first smart phone.

Good invention; I’m using one now.

Was a computing major at university, and we had a saying: Apple products are for the technologically impaired. :p


  • Kayos
  • The Legend

    • 2222

    • March 31, 2016, 07:13:57 pm
    • NZ
Re: Nationalism in children
« Reply #272 on: July 13, 2021, 08:21:58 am »
Right on time come the reality-denying Anglosphere propagandists, these people are the same as the nationalist Koreans this thread is about but they have such low self-awareness they don’t see the irony.

They literally refused to give covid data to the World Health Organization. They have had multiple lockdowns this year because of covid (I have Chinese friends in China that were complaining about being in another lockdown about 7 weeks ago). While I have nothing against China, their government is known for lying and generally being terrible.

I have a lot of friends in Japan (used to live there, and I like Japan a lot). But, to even get a covid test, you have to have had symptoms for somewhere between 7 and 14 days, along with other stuff I don't remember, and even if you tested positive, they were sending people back out into the public. A friend of mine had who teaches there, had a student get covid about 2 - 3 weeks ago, and the school was reluctant to even give the student a single day off school. People weren't even getting themselves tested because of the stupid criteria to get tested, which basically means the numbers they have been reporting are not accurate. Japan didn't even think covid was serious until a famous Japanese person died to covid, and even then, they were only get vigilant about it for a short time, then the big public vacation stuff happened, and it went out the window, then it was back to vigilant for a bit; and to top it all off, the government wasn't offering help to businesses / people to help prevent the spread of covid.


  • 745sticky
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1730

    • March 26, 2020, 01:52:57 pm
    • Korea
Re: Nationalism in children
« Reply #273 on: July 13, 2021, 08:27:13 am »
Was a computing major at university, and we had a saying: Apple products are for the technologically impaired. :p

that's part of what makes them a good product, lol.


Re: Nationalism in children
« Reply #274 on: July 13, 2021, 08:37:38 am »
They literally refused to give covid data to the World Health Organization, bla bla bla.

America hid data, silenced scientists, ran state/corporate fake news on masks not working, and refused to allow investigations into their obviously corrupt affairs. But China is being fake? ㅎㅎㅎ
« Last Edit: July 13, 2021, 08:47:07 am by Kyndo »


Re: Nationalism in children
« Reply #275 on: July 13, 2021, 08:45:50 am »
Was a computing major at university, and we had a saying: Apple products are for the technologically impaired. :p

They do knock it out the park every now and then:

My 2014 MacBook Pro Retina is still going strong, I take it to school everyday.

Haven't discovered a phone as compact as my iPhone SE 1st gen (still using and will only replace with something of similar size, waiting for the rumoured new SE that's coming out in 2022).

Wife got me some Airpod Pros for my birthday, they're fantastic for casual listening, gym or even just putting in my ears during lunch and have the white noise block out the noise of the school.

I stocked up on 3 iPod shuffles after they were discontinued. Nothing works better during training at the track.


  • Kayos
  • The Legend

    • 2222

    • March 31, 2016, 07:13:57 pm
    • NZ
Re: Nationalism in children
« Reply #276 on: July 13, 2021, 09:04:04 am »
They do knock it out the park every now and then:

My 2014 MacBook Pro Retina is still going strong, I take it to school everyday.

Haven't discovered a phone as compact as my iPhone SE 1st gen (still using and will only replace with something of similar size, waiting for the rumoured new SE that's coming out in 2022).

Wife got me some Airpod Pros for my birthday, they're fantastic for casual listening, gym or even just putting in my ears during lunch and have the white noise block out the noise of the school.

I stocked up on 3 iPod shuffles after they were discontinued. Nothing works better during training at the track.

I'm not saying they are terrible, but apple is typically designed with people unfamiliar to technology.
They tend to be more expensive than other quality brands at a similar level. and they tend to charge you a lot if you need to get them fixed, cause you typically have to use an apple shop.
I typically try to avoid apple as much as possible because you pay extra for the brand with no real upside. :p


  • Kayos
  • The Legend

    • 2222

    • March 31, 2016, 07:13:57 pm
    • NZ
Re: Nationalism in children
« Reply #277 on: July 13, 2021, 09:08:19 am »
America hid data, silenced scientists, ran state/corporate fake news on masks not working, and refused to allow investigations into their obviously corrupt affairs. But China is being fake? ㅎㅎㅎ

I know America did that too, Trump believed the Corona virus was just a big hoax the majority of his time in office.
But China was also providing fake info. Japan's was in some kind of grey area, they were making it crazy hard to even get tested, which in turn gave them inaccurate data; but they were reporting accurately of the people who actually managed to get tested (which in my book, means it is inaccurate).


Re: Nationalism in children
« Reply #278 on: July 13, 2021, 09:19:29 am »
They tend to be more expensive than other quality brands at a similar level. and they tend to charge you a lot if you need to get them fixed, cause you typically have to use an apple shop.

I spilled water on my Macbook Pro last month. If I want to get it fixed, its the same price as a brand new Macbook Air :(


  • Kayos
  • The Legend

    • 2222

    • March 31, 2016, 07:13:57 pm
    • NZ
Re: Nationalism in children
« Reply #279 on: July 13, 2021, 09:40:47 am »
I spilled water on my Macbook Pro last month. If I want to get it fixed, its the same price as a brand new Macbook Air :(

And that is pretty much why I hate apple.
And sorry to hear that. :(