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Re: Nationalism in children
« Reply #200 on: June 25, 2021, 02:08:06 pm »
Martino, I don't always agree with your points but you're usually a top notch writer.  What's happening today?  Do you smell toast by chance?  This post has simple grammar errors as well as incomplete thoughts and inconclusive sentences. 
You're right. I don't know what is going on.

Maybe Ol DeMart is finally breaking down. I do have to admit that I had a dream about playing football and completely bumbling around and everything was all garbled. Maybe my brain's "memory restoration process" hit a snag last night during my sleep. Maybe I slept through some Bongo truck blaring that disrupted my sleep and brainwaves.
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  • tylerthegloob
  • The Legend

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Re: Nationalism in children
« Reply #201 on: June 25, 2021, 02:11:13 pm »
my hands are shaking, my hands are shaking but i'm still shooting, and i'm still getting the head shots. it's like boom head shot, boom head shot boom head shot!
more gg more skill


  • gogators!
  • Waygook Lord

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Re: Nationalism in children
« Reply #202 on: June 25, 2021, 10:53:46 pm »
Are you really still trying to claim Panda Express is Chinese food? It's American Chinese food, a food that has only marginal connections to actual Chinese food. Anyone with half a brain knows this.
A Chinese family and a Chinese cook is behind the food at Panda Express. That's more than "a marginal connection to actual Chinese food."

Stick to Doritos. You seem to be an expert or their many permutations.


Re: Nationalism in children
« Reply #203 on: June 26, 2021, 09:18:13 am »
A Chinese family and a Chinese cook is behind the food at Panda Express. That's more than "a marginal connection to actual Chinese food."

Stick to Doritos. You seem to be an expert or their many permutations.
By your "logic" a Chinese family and Chinese cook could open an Olive Garden and claim it's Chinese.

Please tell me what part of China

You do realize anyone who knows anything about food knows American Chinese food isn't Chinese food, right? Or are you one of those idiots who thinks Chi-Chis is Mexican food?
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  • fka
  • Hero of Waygookistan

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Re: Nationalism in children
« Reply #204 on: June 26, 2021, 10:43:57 am »
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=52YOsjGINSc

I didn't watch the whole clip but there's a place in Itaewon (I won't name it, but think of a famous city in Jordan) like this. They've moved to a new, nicer location and I recently went in there unaware of the grave mistake I was about to make. Luckily I saw the owner before I'd ordered and managed to escape without handing over any money. When they were in their previous spot the owner wasted a bunch of time explaining things to me, as if I'd never had Middle Eastern food before, and there was a big list of rules on the menu about how much you had to order, what you could and couldn't do in the restaurant, etc. And then lots of handwritten price changes, crossed out items, etc. Once he left me alone he spent the next 20 minutes screaming at the staff in the kitchen and stomping around the restaurant like a mafia don.


  • dandred
  • Super Waygook

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    • March 28, 2012, 11:24:32 am
    • Bucheon
Re: Nationalism in children
« Reply #205 on: June 26, 2021, 05:11:49 pm »
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6_eU4geveME

This is what happens when the right wing gets into power.
20 years teaching experience. CELTA, DELTA, MA TESOL, PhD slave  / on hold. Thank you.


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  • Waygook Lord

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Re: Nationalism in children
« Reply #206 on: June 27, 2021, 04:50:01 am »
By your "logic" a Chinese family and Chinese cook could open an Olive Garden and claim it's Chinese.

Please tell me what part of China

You do realize anyone who knows anything about food knows American Chinese food isn't Chinese food, right? Or are you one of those idiots who thinks Chi-Chis is Mexican food?
No, that's not my logic at all. That's your twisted attempt to appear smart.

Hunan Province.

American Chinese isn't Chinese--that's funny.


  • Mr C
  • The Legend

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Re: Nationalism in children
« Reply #207 on: June 27, 2021, 10:17:40 am »
No, that's not my logic at all. That's your twisted attempt to appear smart.

Hunan Province.

American Chinese isn't Chinese--that's funny.

Well, it may be funny, but a lot of it is certainly not from China.  Many of the most common dishes you will find at a Chinese restaurant in America are not found in China.  General Tso's chicken, orange chicken, crab rangoon, fortune cookies, kung pao chicken, chow mein are completely made up, their origins in Hawaii, San Francisco, Trader Vic's, Panda Express, etc.

Many other dishes are adaptations for American tastes or American ingredients, like egg foo young, chop suey, and broccoli beef.  New York-invented egg rolls are similar to legit dim sum spring rolls, but are about as authentic as Korea's garlic bread with sugar on.    Heck, one of the "Chinese" restaurants in my town had a sushi bar!

I knew a Chinese-born and raised girl in the States years ago who was incredibly dismissive of the food in Chinese restaurants, insisting that it's just not real Chinese food.  I thought at the time, how could that be?  All the chefs and workers are real Chinese aren't they?

Having been to China several times now, and eaten in dozens and dozens of restaurants and food stalls, I can tell you with certainty (as can any American who has spent time in China--I have a friend who's lived there for nearly a decade) that American Chinese food is just not Chinese.


Re: Nationalism in children
« Reply #208 on: June 27, 2021, 11:25:36 am »
No, that's not my logic at all. That's your twisted attempt to appear smart.

Hunan Province.

American Chinese isn't Chinese--that's funny.
Dude, you know what a Chinese person fresh off the boat will say if you serve them a bunch of American "Chinese food"?

"This is tasty American food, thank you."

They'll have no concept of it being Chinese whatsoever. There's a reason in places with significant Chinese-American places there are either A) Chinese restaurants that have menus completely unfamiliar to Americans or B) Chinese restaurants with secret menus or C) Restaurants that flat out discriminate and serve to Chinese-only and make it clear that you aren't welcome.

What do you think would happen if Panda Express opened in China? Would it just be "Panda Express" and not label itself Chinese food, because being in China, they'd just be serving the same stuff as everyone else, right? No, they'd be advertised as "The American Chinatown taste- the taste you've never had before" or something like that.

Seriously, this has got to be one of the most moronic food takes on here I have ever seen and is right up there with some Korean person thinking their sugared garlic bread is authentic Italian.

Want to put this to a poll on a separate thread and get absolutely humiliated?
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Re: Nationalism in children
« Reply #209 on: June 27, 2021, 11:27:11 am »
Well, it may be funny, but a lot of it is certainly not from China.  Many of the most common dishes you will find at a Chinese restaurant in America are not found in China.  General Tso's chicken, orange chicken, crab rangoon, fortune cookies, kung pao chicken, chow mein are completely made up, their origins in Hawaii, San Francisco, Trader Vic's, Panda Express, etc.

Many other dishes are adaptations for American tastes or American ingredients, like egg foo young, chop suey, and broccoli beef.  New York-invented egg rolls are similar to legit dim sum spring rolls, but are about as authentic as Korea's garlic bread with sugar on.    Heck, one of the "Chinese" restaurants in my town had a sushi bar!

I knew a Chinese-born and raised girl in the States years ago who was incredibly dismissive of the food in Chinese restaurants, insisting that it's just not real Chinese food.  I thought at the time, how could that be?  All the chefs and workers are real Chinese aren't they?

Having been to China several times now, and eaten in dozens and dozens of restaurants and food stalls, I can tell you with certainty (as can any American who has spent time in China--I have a friend who's lived there for nearly a decade) that American Chinese food is just not Chinese.
Very true, with one side note- Often the best American Chinese food at many a place is prepared not by Chef Wong or Chef Jian, but by Chef Dominguez and Chef Garcia.
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  • Waygook Lord

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Re: Nationalism in children
« Reply #210 on: June 28, 2021, 12:28:07 am »
Dude, you know what a Chinese person fresh off the boat will say if you serve them a bunch of American "Chinese food"?

"This is tasty American food, thank you."

They'll have no concept of it being Chinese whatsoever. There's a reason in places with significant Chinese-American places there are either A) Chinese restaurants that have menus completely unfamiliar to Americans or B) Chinese restaurants with secret menus or C) Restaurants that flat out discriminate and serve to Chinese-only and make it clear that you aren't welcome.

What do you think would happen if Panda Express opened in China? Would it just be "Panda Express" and not label itself Chinese food, because being in China, they'd just be serving the same stuff as everyone else, right? No, they'd be advertised as "The American Chinatown taste- the taste you've never had before" or something like that.

Seriously, this has got to be one of the most moronic food takes on here I have ever seen and is right up there with some Korean person thinking their sugared garlic bread is authentic Italian.

Want to put this to a poll on a separate thread and get absolutely humiliated?
"Idiotic, moronic, humiliated." LOL.

But seeing as how you, per your SOP, have set yourself up as an expert on international cuisine, please name the many "authentic" Chinese restaurants you have dined at and name the dishes and what part of China they're from that you ate at these restaurants.

And go ahead and list the publications where your work as a food critic has appeared.

Kindergarten teacher by day, internet gourmand by night.



Re: Nationalism in children
« Reply #211 on: June 28, 2021, 12:57:43 am »
"Idiotic, moronic, humiliated." LOL.

But seeing as how you, per your SOP, have set yourself up as an expert on international cuisine, please name the many "authentic" Chinese restaurants you have dined at and name the dishes and what part of China they're from that you ate at these restaurants.

And go ahead and list the publications where your work as a food critic has appeared.

Kindergarten teacher by day, internet gourmand by night.


How is any of that relevant or addresses the issue of whether American Chinese food is in fact actual Chinese food?
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  • Mr C
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Re: Nationalism in children
« Reply #212 on: June 28, 2021, 07:52:24 am »
"Idiotic, moronic, humiliated." LOL.

But seeing as how you, per your SOP, have set yourself up as an expert on international cuisine, please name the many "authentic" Chinese restaurants you have dined at and name the dishes and what part of China they're from that you ate at these restaurants.


Well, you didn't ask me, but ...

here are some (not an exhaustive listing):
http://seoulpatch.blogspot.com/2019/06/beijing-2019-18-food.html
http://seoulpatch.blogspot.com/2012/10/china-2012-tanner-and-nancys-wedding.html
http://seoulpatch.blogspot.com/2010/10/best-food-in-shanghai.html
http://seoulpatch.blogspot.com/2009/02/beijing-eats.html

I am not an expert, but I think I am in a position to say that much of the food served in American Chinese restaurants is just not authentic Chinese food.

And I'm not saying that food is not perfectly fine, but in my limited experience, it is not as good,.



  • pkjh
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Re: Nationalism in children
« Reply #213 on: June 28, 2021, 10:03:46 am »
I am not an expert, but I think I am in a position to say that much of the food served in American Chinese restaurants is just not authentic Chinese food.
It's a derivative of Chinese food originally catering to white Americans. Just like how Korean-Chinese food like jjangmyeon is a derivative of a similar dish found in northern China.


  • Mr C
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    • October 17, 2012, 03:00:40 pm
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Re: Nationalism in children
« Reply #214 on: June 28, 2021, 10:30:18 am »
It's a derivative of Chinese food originally catering to white Americans. Just like how Korean-Chinese food like jjangmyeon is a derivative of a similar dish found in northern China.

TY.  That is the whole point of this sub-thread.

But actually a fair amount is made up out of whole cloth.  Crab rangoons are unrelated to Chinese cuisine, which does nothing with cream, for instance.  Orange chicken first appeared at Panda Express in 1987.  Etc.
« Last Edit: June 28, 2021, 10:44:32 am by Mr C »


Re: Nationalism in children
« Reply #215 on: June 28, 2021, 01:01:35 pm »
"Idiotic, moronic, humiliated." LOL.

But seeing as how you, per your SOP, have set yourself up as an expert on international cuisine, please name the many "authentic" Chinese restaurants you have dined at and name the dishes and what part of China they're from that you ate at these restaurants.

And go ahead and list the publications where your work as a food critic has appeared.

Kindergarten teacher by day, internet gourmand by night.


People: A duck-billed platypus is a mammal, not a bird. Pretty common knowledge.
gogators!: You're claiming to be an expert on zoology. How many expeditions have you been on? Have you ever been to Australia? And go ahead and list the scientific journals you were published in!

Teacher by day, zoologist by night!

===========================================

You do realize, that YOU are the one that has to show the food served at Panda Express is commonly served in China, right? Please tell me where the Crab Rangoon and the Orange Chicken is from.

I'm still wondering how inside your brain, you thought me being Anthony Bourdain or not somehow impacted whether Panda Express was actual Chinese food or not.
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Re: Nationalism in children
« Reply #216 on: June 28, 2021, 01:07:35 pm »
Well, it may be funny, but a lot of it is certainly not from China.  Many of the most common dishes you will find at a Chinese restaurant in America are not found in China.  General Tso's chicken, orange chicken, crab rangoon, fortune cookies, kung pao chicken, chow mein are completely made up, their origins in Hawaii, San Francisco, Trader Vic's, Panda Express, etc.

Many other dishes are adaptations for American tastes or American ingredients, like egg foo young, chop suey, and broccoli beef.  New York-invented egg rolls are similar to legit dim sum spring rolls, but are about as authentic as Korea's garlic bread with sugar on.    Heck, one of the "Chinese" restaurants in my town had a sushi bar!

I knew a Chinese-born and raised girl in the States years ago who was incredibly dismissive of the food in Chinese restaurants, insisting that it's just not real Chinese food.  I thought at the time, how could that be?  All the chefs and workers are real Chinese aren't they?

Having been to China several times now, and eaten in dozens and dozens of restaurants and food stalls, I can tell you with certainty (as can any American who has spent time in China--I have a friend who's lived there for nearly a decade) that American Chinese food is just not Chinese.

I don't know abou the others, but Kung Pao Chicken is from Sichuan Province. I ate it in Chengdu and it was delicious.  The main difference from American style is that the original uses Sichuan peppercorns, which are numbing-hot, rather than spicy hot.


  • Mr C
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Re: Nationalism in children
« Reply #217 on: June 28, 2021, 01:36:51 pm »
I don't know abou the others, but Kung Pao Chicken is from Sichuan Province. I ate it in Chengdu and it was delicious.  The main difference from American style is that the original uses Sichuan peppercorns, which are numbing-hot, rather than spicy hot.
More or less true, yeah.  I've had it as well.  I would say the American version is dumbed down.  I want to get to Chengdu on my next trip (whenever that may be)  mostly for the apartments that have forests growing out of them and that giant Buddha carved into the hillside. 




  • pkjh
  • The Legend

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    • May 02, 2012, 02:59:44 pm
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Re: Nationalism in children
« Reply #219 on: June 28, 2021, 02:07:18 pm »
I don't know abou the others, but Kung Pao Chicken is from Sichuan Province. I ate it in Chengdu and it was delicious.  The main difference from American style is that the original uses Sichuan peppercorns, which are numbing-hot, rather than spicy hot.
깐풍닭튀김 (Kkangpung-dalktwigim) is a Korean derivative of whatever version is found in China.

As for orange chicken, it's a breaded meat, lots of those in lots of cuisines, including Chinese. It's a derivative of something from China.