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  • jeffdw
  • Newgookin

    • 3

    • August 07, 2017, 10:46:24 am
    • Seoul
Naming Baby in Korea and Canada
« on: May 22, 2021, 02:15:25 pm »
Hi,

I am a Canadian guy and my wife is Korean. We are trying to find out information about naming our baby that will be coming in about 6 months.

Does anyone know the process for naming your baby in Korea and Canada?
Can they have different names in Korea and in Canada with different passports? Does this cause issues?

My wife and I had agreed on using her Korean last name and a Korean name in Korea, but we are unsure how to register in Canada and the baby would have my last name in English?

Example (real names not used):
In Canada: John Woo Jin Kim Doe
In Korea: 김우진 (Kim Woo Jin)

I know that the rules have changes and especially searching some blogs online and even here.

Anyone have any experience in this that could help out?

Any help is appreciated even from your experience.

Thanks in advance!!

Jeff



  • JNM
  • The Legend

    • 4957

    • January 19, 2015, 10:16:48 am
    • Cairo, Egypt (formerly Seoul)
Re: Naming Baby in Korea and Canada
« Reply #1 on: May 23, 2021, 02:14:56 pm »
Congratulations!

Anything I have read suggests that you should give the kid one legal name. The legal name is more important in day-to-day life in Korea, so I would lean that way if there are any compromises. In Canada it is easy to use a nickname, and legally changing a name isnt a big deal there if they want to do that later in life.

Im 김우진, but my friends call me John.

Also, go with three syllables that are easily transliterated and pronounced in both languages.


  • Lazio
  • Expert Waygook

    • 727

    • January 27, 2018, 03:56:10 pm
    • Gyeongi-do
Re: Naming Baby in Korea and Canada
« Reply #2 on: May 23, 2021, 03:56:45 pm »
Congrats!

Dual citizens can have different names in their passports. It's not illegal.
We chose a first name with 2 syllables that works in both languages, easily pronounced and understood etc.
In Korea we used my wife's last name and back home we registered the same first name but with my last name. For example: Kim Mina and Mina Smith.
Not sure about how the Canadian Consulate handles it. I know that some countries require not only the birth cert. from the hospital but also the Korean family registry paper.
One thing is sure: the Korean authorities don't really care whether the child has another citizenship or what name they are registered with in another country.
For us it worked like this: I got an English birth cert. issued by the hospital. They gave me a paper to write down whatever name I wanted. Issued the certificate and stamped it etc. so it looked authentic and all. The hospital also issued a Korean birth cert. but that one didn't even have a name on it for the baby. Just ''wife name's baby''
I took the English one to the consulate and they processed it from there. Wife went to the district office with the Korean birth certificate and registered our child with whatever name she wanted to write on the form.
Also note that it's pretty easy to change a baby's name in Korea. Just pay a few thousand won and fill out a form.
So if Canada wants to see the English birth cert. and the Korean registry paper with the same name on them, you can first register the baby in Korea with a name you want to have in their Canadian passport. Register the child at your embassy with said documents. Once that's done, you can go back to your local office and change the baby's name to what you want to use on the Korean papers.
« Last Edit: May 23, 2021, 04:20:15 pm by Lazio »


  • VanIslander
  • Moderator LVL 1

    • 2872

    • June 02, 2011, 10:12:19 am
    • Seogwipo, Jeju Island
    more
Re: Naming Baby in Korea and Canada
« Reply #3 on: May 23, 2021, 05:16:05 pm »
Bum-suk

Yu Bum-suk

It is a real Korean name. I met him in 2004.


  • VanIslander
  • Moderator LVL 1

    • 2872

    • June 02, 2011, 10:12:19 am
    • Seogwipo, Jeju Island
    more
Re: Naming Baby in Korea and Canada
« Reply #4 on: May 23, 2021, 06:13:50 pm »
I would choose a name that is cool in both cultures.

Especially sounds that travel.

Min-young
Min-ju
Bo-min

(no Jin-ho or Min-ho or other -ho.... in English that girl would receive countless insults).

The first student name I remembered was Yu-jin (memory trick: You -drink- gin).


  • Lazio
  • Expert Waygook

    • 727

    • January 27, 2018, 03:56:10 pm
    • Gyeongi-do
Re: Naming Baby in Korea and Canada
« Reply #5 on: May 23, 2021, 07:38:20 pm »

(no Jin-ho or Min-ho or other -ho.... in English that girl would receive countless insults).

Heck, they would receive a lot of crap even in Korea as those are masculine names.


  • VanIslander
  • Moderator LVL 1

    • 2872

    • June 02, 2011, 10:12:19 am
    • Seogwipo, Jeju Island
    more
Re: Naming Baby in Korea and Canada
« Reply #6 on: May 23, 2021, 08:09:02 pm »
Even worse bud.
Bitch.


  • CO2
  • Waygook Lord

    • 7543

    • March 02, 2015, 03:41:14 pm
    • Uiwang
Re: Naming Baby in Korea and Canada
« Reply #7 on: May 24, 2021, 07:41:45 am »
The first student name I remembered was Yu-jin (memory trick: You -drink- gin).

To each their own, but I found that thinking, "Oh, hey. It's JUST like the name Eugene" worked really well.


  • Kyndo
  • Moderator LVL 1

    • I am a geek!!

    • March 03, 2011, 09:45:24 am
    • Gyeongsangbuk-do
Re: Naming Baby in Korea and Canada
« Reply #8 on: May 24, 2021, 08:10:04 am »
We just used the exact same name for both the Korean hospital records and birth certificate and for our come countries' records. Figured it would save us a lot of potential hassle down the line.
Also, Korea has become a lot less picky regarding name character counts, so that wasn't an issue at all.


Of course, at our eorinijib, they shorten his name, and the way they pronounce that nickname  turns it into a girl's name. I mean, they've also dressed him up in a pink tutu and fairy wings, and gave him a doll and a glittery magic wand to carry around, so I guess it's just par for the course.  :laugh:


  • hangook77
  • The Legend

    • 4574

    • September 14, 2017, 09:10:12 am
    • Near Busan
Re: Naming Baby in Korea and Canada
« Reply #9 on: May 24, 2021, 08:12:24 am »
Name the him Bob and be done with it.


  • OnNut81
  • The Legend

    • 2669

    • April 01, 2011, 03:01:41 pm
    • Anyang
Re: Naming Baby in Korea and Canada
« Reply #10 on: May 24, 2021, 11:33:47 am »
Why are legitimate posts questioning someone's responses being deleted? 


  • OnNut81
  • The Legend

    • 2669

    • April 01, 2011, 03:01:41 pm
    • Anyang
Re: Naming Baby in Korea and Canada
« Reply #11 on: May 24, 2021, 11:35:18 am »
Even worse bud.
Bitch.

Offensive, inappropriate and irrelevant.  I'm reporting this comment.


  • AvecPommesFrites
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1075

    • September 04, 2017, 02:19:33 pm
    • Incheon International Airport Immigration Office Detention Facility
Re: Naming Baby in Korea and Canada
« Reply #12 on: May 24, 2021, 11:41:26 am »
강방미 & 박미순 work well in both languages.
Soggy undergarments


  • Renma
  • Veteran

    • 118

    • September 01, 2014, 06:09:42 am
Re: Naming Baby in Korea and Canada
« Reply #13 on: May 24, 2021, 11:50:03 am »
Why are legitimate posts questioning someone's responses being deleted? 

Post drinking regret for our paragon mod


  • OnNut81
  • The Legend

    • 2669

    • April 01, 2011, 03:01:41 pm
    • Anyang
Re: Naming Baby in Korea and Canada
« Reply #14 on: May 24, 2021, 11:54:44 am »
Post drinking regret for our paragon mod

I think so. 


  • starryella
  • Veteran

    • 81

    • November 07, 2019, 04:29:39 pm
    • Busan, South Korea
Re: Naming Baby in Korea and Canada
« Reply #15 on: May 24, 2021, 01:07:33 pm »
I have never gone through this process but from what I have seen in groups with parents going through the same thing, it is much easier for everyone involved if the names are the same, legally, in both countries.

If your son will spend most of his time in Canada, then it really probably won't matter how long his name is, but I can say from experience that foreign, or "unusual" name formats can be rather difficult to deal with in Korea, It's one of the reasons my husband and I have already agreed we won't be assigning a legal middle name for our children (common in US culture but not in Korean culture) but do intend to pick an unofficial middle name that won't be reflected on passports, legal documents, or the birth certificate.

Of course, it is your right to name your kid anything you want in any format, for the record I think both names you've chosen are lovely.