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  • OnNut81
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1978

    • April 01, 2011, 03:01:41 pm
    • Anyang
Yes, private schools, in the western sense, aren't allowed. And with the exception of truly international schools (where only diplomat's children are allowed), the current government is against private schools. Koreans overwhelmingly do oppose elitist private schools. However, specialization schools is pretty decisive, and more 50/50 split on opinion. The current government opposes those specialized science, and language, high schools though. Of course a 'conservative' government can change course.



I thought the true international schools were open to a Korean who had lived abroad a certain number of years or they had one non-Korean parent?  Just what I've heard, and as I don't have kids myself, I didn't look into it.  I did have an adult student who was an architect a few years back and his wife and son lived in Chiang Mai so his son could attend an English speaking international school as he had no avenue for entry in Korea.  So, if the parents are really set on it, they can go abroad.  Of course, money is an issue. 


  • L I
  • Waygook Lord

    • 6119

    • October 03, 2011, 01:50:58 pm
High school is optional. (Guitarist Sungha Jung didnít go.) And I know a woman in her 40s who only went to elementary school. So sad!


  • pkjh
  • The Legend

    • 2065

    • May 02, 2012, 02:59:44 pm
    • Asia
I thought the true international schools were open to a Korean who had lived abroad a certain number of years or they had one non-Korean parent?  Just what I've heard, and as I don't have kids myself, I didn't look into it.  I did have an adult student who was an architect a few years back and his wife and son lived in Chiang Mai so his son could attend an English speaking international school as he had no avenue for entry in Korea.  So, if the parents are really set on it, they can go abroad.  Of course, money is an issue. 
At the moment international schools do allow Korean citizens, but the government doesn't like it. They want to keep Korean kids in Korean schools.

High school is optional. (Guitarist Sungha Jung didnít go.) And I know a woman in her 40s who only went to elementary school. So sad!
A good chunk of women over 60, who grew up in rural areas only have an elementary education. Also, I'm willing to bet a lot of them can barely read too.


  • hangook77
  • The Legend

    • 3152

    • September 14, 2017, 09:10:12 am
    • Near Busan
Yes, private schools, in the western sense, aren't allowed. And with the exception of truly international schools (where only diplomat's children are allowed), the current government is against private schools. Koreans overwhelmingly do oppose elitist private schools. However, specialization schools is pretty decisive, and more 50/50 split on opinion. The current government opposes those specialized science, and language, high schools though. Of course a 'conservative' government can change course.

After WWII Korea was a dirt poor country. Private schools were encouraged to provide education that the government, at the time, just couldn't afford to cover. So, that is why private schools are essentially public schools. They have to accept students the government says, and the government has final say on all decisions. As to how closely they monitor this is another matter. That's why you have half the student body in catholic private schools not being catholic. Up until like the 80s only elementary education was guaranteed, and mandatory. Now I believe you can't leave school until your at least 16.

I understand this if the government gives money which Korea does.  Then the private schools have to follow government rules.  It is a form of control.  It does violate a basic freedom principle if they cannot go full private with no government funding.  Then they should be able to do what they want because they are paying for it by itself. 

For the record I never went to any elite private school though I did briefly do a type of private Christian type of homeschool (ACE program) which was far from exclusive or preppy.  But mostly I did the public schools like you.  But when I went to this other school they taught what they wanted because they took no government money.  If they took government money, they would have had to follow their rules.  It may be different there now though.  Hard to say. 


  • hangook77
  • The Legend

    • 3152

    • September 14, 2017, 09:10:12 am
    • Near Busan
At the moment international schools do allow Korean citizens, but the government doesn't like it. They want to keep Korean kids in Korean schools.
A good chunk of women over 60, who grew up in rural areas only have an elementary education. Also, I'm willing to bet a lot of them can barely read too.

Seems like Korean government likes a lot of control.  No other reason for it.  Control the kids, indoctrination, etc.  Borderline Communist.  I had no idea quite how that worked.  Koreans never really seemed to know or be able to answer my questions.  (It amazes me how many people, especially those more traditionally minded seem to know nothing outside of their field that they studied in.  General knowledge not high.  Younger and less traditionally minded seem more well informed about things and also get things like humor and wit.  But this is a whole other topic.) 

I am shocked to say the least. 


Yes, private schools, in the western sense, aren't allowed. And with the exception of truly international schools (where only diplomat's children are allowed), the current government is against private schools. Koreans overwhelmingly do oppose elitist private schools. However, specialization schools is pretty decisive, and more 50/50 split on opinion. The current government opposes those specialized science, and language, high schools though. Of course a 'conservative' government can change course.

From what I've heard, many Korean private schools function nothing like Western private schools, which boast a very high academic standard for a hell of a lot of money. Korean private schools seem to have a bad reputation of shoddy education by tenured teachers who couldn't give a sh*t. A teacher who previously taught at a private school and whose farther was the principal worked at a school I taught at, for some reason, and NOBODY liked this guy. The students tried to get him fired and he was put on leave for a couple of months and made to go to therapy as he literally called his student trash and was incredibly rude and antisocial to the everyone at school. He returned and seems no different.

Let's say I'm wrong, and Korean private schools, or at least some, offer stellar education.

If I had to guess I'd say the main opposition isn't the private schools, but rather how the elite would take advantage of them, as they do/did at international schools. International schools, undoubtably, provided the best opportunity for English immersion and only allowed a small percentage of Koreans to enrol. Naturally bribes and whatnot ensued and these schools discouraged anyone but the richest (rich Koreans) from applying by jacking up the fees to the point that only a Chaebol heir's parents could afford it. Probably the biggest national issue in recent years is divide between rich and everyone else. Most Koreans will likely be vehemently opposed to anything that makes it even more difficult to compete with kids from rich families when it comes to getting into a good university.


  • pkjh
  • The Legend

    • 2065

    • May 02, 2012, 02:59:44 pm
    • Asia
A teacher who previously taught at a private school and whose farther was the principal worked at a school I taught at, for some reason, and NOBODY liked this guy. The students tried to get him fired and he was put on leave for a couple of months and made to go to therapy as he literally called his student trash and was incredibly rude and antisocial to the everyone at school. He returned and seems no different.
One of the reasons the government wants to take over all private schools. These days they've brought private-school hiring more inline with the public systems, where they will sent teachers who passed the test to private schools if need be. But in the past private-schools would literally hire unqualified relatives.

"You placed last in your degree for basket-weaving? Well since you're my wife's nephew, I'll make you a math teacher at our school."


Let's say I'm wrong, and Korean private schools, or at least some, offer stellar education.
Private-schools in Korea were never meant to be a separate system to the public system. They were just to be administered privately (purchasing of land, and building buildings by private entities), but provide public education to the masses in areas where the government just couldn't commit funds to open schools. Most of the private schools today were open pre-80s, and the vast majority were secondary schools. The government ran all the primary school, because that's what they could afford back in the day..


How about one of those schools like in 'The Classic' where they're teaching folk dancing and whatnot?

Also, bring back the old school uniforms that kind of looked like Japanese naval uniforms. With the hat and the black suit with the Nehru collar.


  • Mr C
  • The Legend

    • 2601

    • October 17, 2012, 03:00:40 pm
    • Seoul
How about one of those schools like in 'The Classic' where they're teaching folk dancing and whatnot?

Also, bring back the old school uniforms that kind of looked like Japanese naval uniforms. With the hat and the black suit with the Nehru collar.

The boys' school I taught at for 4 years when I came here had that--without the hat.  Military gray with the collar, brass buttons, epaulettes, black accent stripes.  One co told me the boys liked the uniform for its "convenience", i.e., no necktie.  It's what they still wear.

The school was founded in 1976, when, "old Mr Lee"  told me, there was nothing around here but rice fields.  The main entrance hall has trophy cabinets including very military memorabilia and photos of boys posed with missiles and tanks and such.


  • VanIslander
  • Moderator LVL 1

    • 2421

    • June 02, 2011, 10:12:19 am
    • Seogwipo, Jeju Island
    more
I'm sorry. Do we work in a bank?

May 1st has never been a holiday for me or anyone I know going back to last century.


I'm sorry. Do we work in a bank?

May 1st has never been a holiday for me or anyone I know going back to last century.


You must not know many people and thatís ok. Keep your circle small.


  • pkjh
  • The Legend

    • 2065

    • May 02, 2012, 02:59:44 pm
    • Asia
You must not know many people and thatís ok. Keep your circle small.
May 1st isn't a holiday in the US, or Canada. So, a lot of north Americans don't know about May 1st. I didn't learn about until like grade 10 social studies.

Our labo(u)r day is in September.


  • L I
  • Waygook Lord

    • 6119

    • October 03, 2011, 01:50:58 pm
"When the United States began to seriously consider creating a national holiday for workers, U.S. President Grover Cleveland did not want to choose the May date because of its association with the Haymaker bombing, so instead picked the alternative day in September."
___________________ _______
Both the US and Canada designated Labor Day as a holiday the first Monday of September starting in 1894.


  • hangook77
  • The Legend

    • 3152

    • September 14, 2017, 09:10:12 am
    • Near Busan
"When the United States began to seriously consider creating a national holiday for workers, U.S. President Grover Cleveland did not want to choose the May date because of its association with the Haymaker bombing, so instead picked the alternative day in September."
___________________ _______
Both the US and Canada designated Labor Day as a holiday the first Monday of September starting in 1894.

Our ancestors were tough anti commies!!  (Though I am not necessarily anti union.  Some of those Amazon workers could use one.)


  • pkjh
  • The Legend

    • 2065

    • May 02, 2012, 02:59:44 pm
    • Asia
Our ancestors were tough anti commies!!  (Though I am not necessarily anti union.  Some of those Amazon workers could use one.)
1894, no country in the world had a governing body that claimed to be communist at that time. Most of the world was still ruled by monarchs.


  • L I
  • Waygook Lord

    • 6119

    • October 03, 2011, 01:50:58 pm
The Communist Manifesto was published in 1848. (How long it took to be widely read I donít know.)


  • tylerthegloob
  • The Legend

    • 2312

    • September 28, 2016, 10:46:24 am
    • Busan
    more
i think a few people might have read it around 1917. can't be sure though
more gg more skill


  • pkjh
  • The Legend

    • 2065

    • May 02, 2012, 02:59:44 pm
    • Asia
The Communist Manifesto was published in 1848. (How long it took to be widely read I donít know.)
Most of the world was also alliterate back then. But, the ideas would spread.

Communism was largely theory until the Russians put it to use. And was a very popular theory, since most people were still under repressive forms of government, and subsistence living.


  • tylerthegloob
  • The Legend

    • 2312

    • September 28, 2016, 10:46:24 am
    • Busan
    more
Most of the world was also alliterate back then. But, the ideas would spread.
It was rare to run into real, refined readers.
more gg more skill


  • hangook77
  • The Legend

    • 3152

    • September 14, 2017, 09:10:12 am
    • Near Busan
1894, no country in the world had a governing body that claimed to be communist at that time. Most of the world was still ruled by monarchs.

Marxism was a very real ideology at that time.