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  • hangook77
  • The Legend

    • 3152

    • September 14, 2017, 09:10:12 am
    • Near Busan
Me, too. So I'm wondering if there was a memo sent to every school reminding them to deduct vacation days from the NET when the school is closed. Last year this wasn't the case. Now it is.

That could be it.  I didnt have any days off last year for school holidays due to covid.  But I did get some work from homes.


  • Kayos
  • The Legend

    • 2104

    • March 31, 2016, 07:13:57 pm
    • NZ
Nope, the labor day isn't one of the days that will be comped if it falls on a weekend.
and even though we are contract workers, there are contract workers in other sectors that usually have to work Saturday's, so they'll get the day off, while we miss out this year.


  • Kayos
  • The Legend

    • 2104

    • March 31, 2016, 07:13:57 pm
    • NZ
Yep same here.  I had two schools pull this new rule on me, plus I hear there are new other rules added into the contract this year such as mandatory moving to other places and other lame rules which were not enforced but now are.  I told my teachers this was dumb and signaled out the foreigners.  Some friends didn't even know about it when I told them this week about it.  They were pretty pissed this week.  More rules and no pay raise.  I guess they really want their experienced teachers to leave.  They'll soon get their wish.  Anyhow, since the weather usually sucks in summer (too humid, rainy , and hot), I guess I'll bite the bullet and take two days in May.  At least the weather is usually nice then.

Mandatory moving to other places was considered, but never passed. I heard it's because Korean teachers have to, they felt it was unfair foreigners didn't have to - but, that's just what I heard, I know it didn't pass though.


  • hangook77
  • The Legend

    • 3152

    • September 14, 2017, 09:10:12 am
    • Near Busan
Mandatory moving to other places was considered, but never passed. I heard it's because Korean teachers have to, they felt it was unfair foreigners didn't have to - but, that's just what I heard, I know it didn't pass though.

It's in my contract from this year or maybe last.  Who knows.  It is four years for me instead of 10 years for Korean elementary teachers.  Keep putting more rules.  Keep pushing.  If they start raising the salaries, then maybe, I'll put up with it.  I told them they will start losing people.  But if you are dealing with very traditonal minded Koreans they usually put their head in the sand and will ignore a problem until it blows up into a bigger one.  many of them tend to study intensively in their small area of expertiece and know nothing about any other area and are actually below average knowledge.  I usually work with and meet most modern minded Koreans, especially in recent years.  But every once in a while, you end up dealing with a very old fashioned very traditionally minded one who knows nothing about the world around them and have that nagging nitpicking nothing is every good enough and probably hates foreigners too.  This might be what I am running into.  I'm so blunt with them, I may get non renewed this summer.  I may get renewed and leave in a year or two.  We shall see.  Drum roll please.  Either way, there's options now that weren't here until very recently. 


  • D.L.Orean
  • Super Waygook

    • 375

    • February 25, 2020, 09:34:41 am
It's in my contract from this year or maybe last.  Who knows.  It is four years for me instead of 10 years for Korean elementary teachers.  Keep putting more rules.  Keep pushing.  If they start raising the salaries, then maybe, I'll put up with it.  I told them they will start losing people.  But if you are dealing with very traditonal minded Koreans they usually put their head in the sand and will ignore a problem until it blows up into a bigger one.  many of them tend to study intensively in their small area of expertiece and know nothing about any other area and are actually below average knowledge.  I usually work with and meet most modern minded Koreans, especially in recent years.  But every once in a while, you end up dealing with a very old fashioned very traditionally minded one who knows nothing about the world around them and have that nagging nitpicking nothing is every good enough and probably hates foreigners too.  This might be what I am running into.  I'm so blunt with them, I may get non renewed this summer.  I may get renewed and leave in a year or two.  We shall see.  Drum roll please.  Either way, there's options now that weren't here until very recently.

What province are you in that teachers can stay at the same school for 10 years?


  • pkjh
  • The Legend

    • 2065

    • May 02, 2012, 02:59:44 pm
    • Asia
What province are you in that teachers can stay at the same school for 10 years?
Could be a private school.


  • D.L.Orean
  • Super Waygook

    • 375

    • February 25, 2020, 09:34:41 am
Could be a private school.

Isn't there no limit in private schools?


  • tylerthegloob
  • The Legend

    • 2312

    • September 28, 2016, 10:46:24 am
    • Busan
    more
What province are you in that teachers can stay at the same school for 10 years?
"near busan" sooo must be 경상남도?
more gg more skill


  • Kyndo
  • Moderator LVL 1

    • 2185

    • March 03, 2011, 09:45:24 am
    • Gyeongsangbuk-do
Mandatory moving to other places was considered, but never passed. I heard it's because Korean teachers have to, they felt it was unfair foreigners didn't have to - but, that's just what I heard, I know it didn't pass though.
Only applies to public school teachers: private school teachers can stay at their schools for as long as they like (unless they're given the boot like Dipped's hopefully will be lol).
I wonder if the push to have us NETs moved around every 4 or 5 years would mean that other contract teachers like KETs etc would then also be required to move? I imagine there was quite a bit of push back against that!

Anyway, considering that the 2 main reasons for installing a 4 or 5 year term limit was A) to prevent the formation of old boys' clubs and B) to give new teachers opportunities, making NETs move wouldn't help either cause, so I'm not surprised that nothing came of it.

So far. Keeping fingers crossed!  :lipsrsealed:


  • L I
  • Waygook Lord

    • 6119

    • October 03, 2011, 01:50:58 pm
There are private schools functioning like public schools where some NETs are placed.  (I was at one such place.) They can make their own rules about how long teachers can stay. Ten years ... or forever.


  • L I
  • Waygook Lord

    • 6119

    • October 03, 2011, 01:50:58 pm
What Iím talking about is something that looks like a public school and kids go to for free but is privately upper managed. Something like that. They get government money but try to run the school in a more cost effective way.


  • Kyndo
  • Moderator LVL 1

    • 2185

    • March 03, 2011, 09:45:24 am
    • Gyeongsangbuk-do
All the middle schools that I've worked at here in Korea have been private ones. Awesome sense of community at private schools!
The first one I taught at was a private Catholic school. A lot of the classes were taught by nuns, which felt odd. For the first couple of months I felt a bit like a vampire hesitating at a threshold after being invited in...

Interestingly, the KET I taught the C classes with was secretly hard-core atheist lol.
Also, one of the high points of my five years there was that I introduced one of the nuns to Tristania (well, their music, at any rate) Some of their tunes are very orchestral, and sound like what you would hear at a mass. The rest... well, the rest is your standard Norwegian death metal.   :laugh:

I miss that school.  :sad: They had to cancel their NET position - they receive some of their funding from the Catholic foundation, but a lot of it still comes from the government. I think very few schools in Korea are 100% privately funded. International schools, mostly, I think.
« Last Edit: April 29, 2021, 11:11:13 am by Kyndo »


  • pkjh
  • The Legend

    • 2065

    • May 02, 2012, 02:59:44 pm
    • Asia
What Iím talking about is something that looks like a public school and kids go to for free but is privately upper managed. Something like that. They get government money but try to run the school in a more cost effective way.
Not sure if it's more cost effective. Most private schools are around because up until maybe the 80s most government run schools were up to grade 6, especially in rural areas. So, the government  encouraged private entities to start secondary schools, and the government would chip in with the costs. They get audited more frequently then public schools, because they've historically been more corrupt. I think it's like every 3 years, instead of 5.

There are private schools functioning like public schools where some NETs are placed.  (I was at one such place.) They can make their own rules about how long teachers can stay. Ten years ... or forever.
True. Also, some private entities run more than one school, and might have their own rotation system. And full-time teachers in private-schools are also tenured, and are considered government employees. If a private-school really wants to axe a full-timer, the teacher will probably be moved into the public system. I've heard of it a few times, but only seen it once. Supposedly the moved teacher had a big issue with someone important in his previous private-school.
« Last Edit: April 29, 2021, 11:25:44 am by pkjh »


  • Renma
  • Veteran

    • 79

    • September 01, 2014, 06:09:42 am
Supposedly they're trying to fold all of these private schools into the public system by 2025. One of my side schools has had teachers there for their entire career, I wonder how they'll cope with the changes.


  • pkjh
  • The Legend

    • 2065

    • May 02, 2012, 02:59:44 pm
    • Asia
Supposedly they're trying to fold all of these private schools into the public system by 2025. One of my side schools has had teachers there for their entire career, I wonder how they'll cope with the changes.
Probably better off. Private-schools are often family owned fiefdoms, if you aren't somehow related (sometimes literally) to the ownership you have very little chance of being promoted to something higher than head teacher.


I have the two days after Children's Day off, so a five day weekend but I'm using vacation time in order to do this. A lot of my friends weren't allowed to do this, but I'm going to use the time since the weather beats August's heat.


  • hangook77
  • The Legend

    • 3152

    • September 14, 2017, 09:10:12 am
    • Near Busan
What province are you in that teachers can stay at the same school for 10 years?

Elementary schools.  Ten years in one area (two five year stints at two different schools same city or gun).  Middle and High schools have 6 years in one area before having to transfer.  So, not sure why the Ed office are being so ignorant to us.  Plus this new holiday system.  Due to rain now, I have to report to my main school instead next Tues.  The teacher I have there will make me teach classes on top of that instead of just desk warm.  It just gets better and better.  Other new rules coming in or came in but weren't enforced but now are starting to be.  Precious. 


  • hangook77
  • The Legend

    • 3152

    • September 14, 2017, 09:10:12 am
    • Near Busan
Probably better off. Private-schools are often family owned fiefdoms, if you aren't somehow related (sometimes literally) to the ownership you have very little chance of being promoted to something higher than head teacher.

In the west private schools are fuly private and get no government money.  They can do whatever they want though they may have to follow some basic rules or curriculum, but many things are open to whatever they want since they fund themselves.  I am not sure why governments fund them all here.  I had heard governments were trying to take them over and make them fully public.  But why not just go fully private and shun government money charging tuition?  Is it not allowed here or something?  I know some schools refuse government money back home because they don't want to give up their freedom of religion or moral beliefs.  Some also want freedom to teach other subjects and have other activities.  There is no requirement to take government money there.  Is there here?  I can't udnerstand why there is so much controvery with private schools here and complaining of favortism.  Why not just go full private and take no government money?  Then, they can do what they want.


  • Kyndo
  • Moderator LVL 1

    • 2185

    • March 03, 2011, 09:45:24 am
    • Gyeongsangbuk-do
Because fully privatizing education is a terrible, terrible idea.

It creates a reduction in the quality of the services, and means that only children from wealthy families can afford the education required for the most competitive jobs. It also creates massive amounts of debt for those families who attempt to give their children a good education.

I mean, look at the USA: is that really an education system that you want to model yours after?
Sure, it has some truly fantastic universities (allegedly), but it also has some of the most predatory establishments as well. A generation of graduates tens of thousands of dollars in debt is bad for any economy.

Socialized education is the way to go, or, if not that, then carefully regulated private schools.


Also, no, I'm not getting compensated for the fact that May 1st is on a weekend, unfortunately.  :sad:


  • pkjh
  • The Legend

    • 2065

    • May 02, 2012, 02:59:44 pm
    • Asia
In the west private schools are fuly private and get no government money.  They can do whatever they want though they may have to follow some basic rules or curriculum, but many things are open to whatever they want since they fund themselves.  I am not sure why governments fund them all here.  I had heard governments were trying to take them over and make them fully public.  But why not just go fully private and shun government money charging tuition?  Is it not allowed here or something?  I know some schools refuse government money back home because they don't want to give up their freedom of religion or moral beliefs.  Some also want freedom to teach other subjects and have other activities.  There is no requirement to take government money there.  Is there here?  I can't udnerstand why there is so much controvery with private schools here and complaining of favortism.  Why not just go full private and take no government money?  Then, they can do what they want.
Yes, private schools, in the western sense, aren't allowed. And with the exception of truly international schools (where only diplomat's children are allowed), the current government is against private schools. Koreans overwhelmingly do oppose elitist private schools. However, specialization schools is pretty decisive, and more 50/50 split on opinion. The current government opposes those specialized science, and language, high schools though. Of course a 'conservative' government can change course.

After WWII Korea was a dirt poor country. Private schools were encouraged to provide education that the government, at the time, just couldn't afford to cover. So, that is why private schools are essentially public schools. They have to accept students the government says, and the government has final say on all decisions. As to how closely they monitor this is another matter. That's why you have half the student body in catholic private schools not being catholic. Up until like the 80s only elementary education was guaranteed, and mandatory. Now I believe you can't leave school until your at least 16.