Read 3087 times

  • hangook77
  • The Legend

    • 3671

    • September 14, 2017, 09:10:12 am
    • Near Busan
Re: How much do teacher's really want an experienced native teacher?
« Reply #40 on: March 18, 2021, 10:39:06 am »
This is somewhat overstated, but I'll just amend it from "attends a hagwon" to "spends two years in an immersion program in New Zealand or southern California".
 
Also, public school teachers are not "zoo animals", more like "zookeepers" or Steve Irwin-style showmen, and we're not "paid a handsome salary" we're paid what used to be a handsome salary eaten away by inflation--just today, my favored breakfast pastry jumped up by 200 W.  I haven't had a raise in 8 years.

And I am under no illusion that even if I were God's gift to teaching, I could transform English learning by my students.  My aim in elementary school is to have them develop a positive attitude to English and instill positive habits of language learning. 

Elements like scaffolding sentences, spelling and sentence syntax with scramble and other puzzles which challenge their natural desires (concentration aka matching. rebuses, hidden pictures, vanishing pictures, etc), fun concepts like conversation with favorite characters--anytime Pororo or Pikachu or Harry Potter comes along, there is an uptick in interest.   The fact that there are a billion bomb games here makes me think they're overused, but a bit of competition has its place, a few times a semester--but please make sure the whole class repeats the question and the answer ...

My co-teachers definitely help during appropriate activities, but actually appreciate the chance to sit at the back and mark their homework notebooks as I lead the activities.  We had 4th grade for the third time today, and they remind me of the last two sixth grades, they were sooo enthusiastic--I commented to my Co that I hoped they would still feel that way when they went on.  She was in agreement.

So, at the elementary level, I don't think it's about actual acquisition as much as it is about attitude.  And we as NETs can definitely help or even make a big difference in that regard. 

Well if you do a bomb game every class, that's a bit much.  Maybe a chapter review or every other chapter or something.  Should incorporate other different activities and games.  Though writing or speaking activities are the most common due to K teachers wanting you to match the part of the book. 


Re: How much do teacher's really want an experienced native teacher?
« Reply #41 on: March 18, 2021, 11:21:51 am »
Not quite disagreeing with you here, but I think that the percentage of NETs who are conversational in a second language is going to be significantly higher than that percentage back in their home country.
Even if it is higher, the fact is that there aren't hordes of conversational people being churned out by our school systems back home.

Also, I'm willing to be that a fair number of people rating themselves as "conversational" are about the same level as those Koreans who they think aren't that great at English, given what we know about bias. They're probably more likely to overrate their own skills and underrate the skills of people speaking their language.
 
Put simply- There aren't the results in our own countries to support the conclusion that this is down to curriculum.

Martin bases his opinion on the South Africans he's met here however, most South Africans in Korea are white and therefore, more likely of Afrikaaner descent. The reason most white South Africans come here is quite simple, people of means are the ones who generally have a tertiary level of education.
Fair point and accepted. That being said, Afrikaans is a lot more similar to English than English is to Korean. You don't have to learn an entirely new alphabet for starters. There are also going to be words that are somewhat similar.

This is Quora, so I take it with a grain of salt, but if Afrikaans and English are this similar, then yeah, it's really not an appropriate comparison. Like you have sentences that are basically mutually intelligible.
https://www.quora.com/How-similar-is-Afrikaans-to-English


  • Kyndo
  • Moderator LVL 1

    • 2294

    • March 03, 2011, 09:45:24 am
    • Gyeongsangbuk-do
Re: How much do teacher's really want an experienced native teacher?
« Reply #42 on: March 18, 2021, 01:00:45 pm »
Even if it is higher, the fact is that there aren't hordes of conversational people being churned out by our school systems back home.
I'd imagine that you're probably right. A lot of these multi-lingual waygooks are probably multi-lingual due to having lived in or immigrated from a non-English country to an English one, or grew up in a non-English majority area in an English speaking country.

Also, I'm willing to be that a fair number of people rating themselves as "conversational" are about the same level as those Koreans who they think aren't that great at English, given what we know about bias. They're probably more likely to overrate their own skills and underrate the skills of people speaking their language.
I think that part of the issue is that many of us NETs use a very different metric to describe their own language abilities than most Koreans do. Most Westerners focus very strongly on communicative skills: for example, when I study Korean, I do so purely to be able to speak. So my focus is on (surprise surprise) grammatically simple sentences that can be used in as many different scenarios as possible. On the other hand, most Koreans have a surprisingly strong grasp of nuanced, complex grammatical structures, and a really astonishing vocab. They just haven't really put in a lot of time to put that into practice, so their conversational skills lag far behind.
 
That being said, Afrikaans is a lot more similar to English than English is to Korean.
Yeah. In fact, Dutch/Afrikaans/Friesian as a group is probably the closest language to English. Interestingly, it's easier for the former to learn the latter than vice versa. Probably because all you Anglos are monolingual dunderfluffs.  :smiley:


Re: How much do teacher's really want an experienced native teacher?
« Reply #43 on: March 18, 2021, 02:33:29 pm »
I think that part of the issue is that many of us NETs use a very different metric to describe their own language abilities than most Koreans do. Most Westerners focus very strongly on communicative skills: for example, when I study Korean, I do so purely to be able to speak. So my focus is on (surprise surprise) grammatically simple sentences that can be used in as many different scenarios as possible. On the other hand, most Koreans have a surprisingly strong grasp of nuanced, complex grammatical structures, and a really astonishing vocab. They just haven't really put in a lot of time to put that into practice, so their conversational skills lag far behind.
While that's definitely a thing, I was referring more to people who refer to their abilities as conversational, who are speaking the equivalent in Spanish of "Hello, I'm fine thank you. I had a funny time at a shopping mall with us." and declare themselves to be conversational while a Korean saying that in English is deemed "can barely speak". I think an objective assessment might yield a different result.