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Re: Confucianism; How to Understand Korean Culture
« Reply #80 on: July 15, 2021, 07:49:00 am »
yeah. **** you sticky, especially if you're being sincere


Re: Confucianism; How to Understand Korean Culture
« Reply #81 on: July 21, 2021, 07:29:35 am »
Another important concept in Confucianism, which is huge in Neo-Confucianism (Joseon was a Neo-Confucian revolution), is chung 誠 (정). Chung is all around us in Korea, but the average foreigner has no clue about this value and its thousands of year long history. Chung is one of those concepts that can’t really be translated into English, because English culture doesn’t have the concept…

“The Chinese word chung means not only sincerity in the ordinary sense, but also absence of fault, seriousness, being true to one's real self, being true to the nature of things, actuality, and realness.”—Wingtsit Chan.

This “sincerity” concept is much deeper than the English term, and has to do with the unity between man and nature which is at the heart of Chinese philosophy. From perfect sincerity there is nowhere to run, nowhere to retreat to, because you’re already at your true nature—that’s the highest chung.

Chung comes up all the time in daily Korean life. Last week a dinner group described someone in a positive way referencing their 정, the other week some kid sent me a resume saying he was 성실하다 (comes from 誠實하다), some girls on the subway said 정말? (comes from 正, the Confucian rectification of names; names should correspond to actuality; “really? Yes really!”). BTW, this is why saying things like “you’re fat” to friends and family is considered a virtue (it is “realness,” relevant, not hiding from reality).

Advice: conduct yourself in this manner in Korea, in business and personal matters and you’ll get better results Chung is the solution, and why East Asia is so based.

Mod edit: removed needlessly inflammatory content
« Last Edit: July 24, 2021, 11:26:19 am by Kyndo »


Re: Confucianism; How to Understand Korean Culture
« Reply #82 on: July 21, 2021, 07:46:58 am »
man you really are my favorite troll. just as a quick tip though, romanizing 정 as 'chung' is super ass


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Re: Confucianism; How to Understand Korean Culture
« Reply #83 on: July 21, 2021, 08:40:19 am »
Another important concept in Confucianism, which is huge in Neo-Confucianism (Joseon was a Neo-Confucian revolution), is chung 誠 (정). Chung is all around us in Korea, but the average foreigner has no clue about this value and its thousands of year long history. Chung is one of those concepts that can’t really be translated into English, because English culture doesn’t have the concept…

“The Chinese word chung means not only sincerity in the ordinary sense, but also absence of fault, seriousness, being true to one's real self, being true to the nature of things, actuality, and realness.”—Wingtsit Chan.

This “sincerity” concept is much deeper than the English term, and has to do with the unity between man and nature which is at the heart of Chinese philosophy. From perfect sincerity there is nowhere to run, nowhere to retreat to, because you’re already at your true nature—that’s the highest chung.

Chung comes up all the time in daily Korean life. Last week a dinner group described someone in a positive way referencing their 정, the other week some kid sent me a resume saying he was 성실하다 (comes from 誠實하다), some girls on the subway said 정말? (comes from 正, the Confucian rectification of names; names should correspond to actuality; “really? Yes really!”). BTW, this is why saying things like “you’re fat” to friends and family, which Westerners can’t understand, is considered a virtue (it is “realness,” relevant, not hiding from reality). Koreans hate fake sincerity and can see right thru it (you should be aware of this; your fake act won’t work here).

Advice: conduct yourself in this manner in Korea, in business and personal matters and you’ll get better results—leave the insincere English lying culture behind, that culture is collapsing into post-truth back home. Chung is the solution, and why East Asia is so based.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BoXu6QmxpJE
Trolls on here are lame and need to get a life.




Re: Confucianism; How to Understand Korean Culture
« Reply #85 on: July 25, 2021, 05:58:50 am »
This demonstrates the trueness of Asimov’s famous comment; there’s a deep hostility toward knowledge, especially cultural knowledge due to the deep supremacism/evangelical ideology.
« Last Edit: July 25, 2021, 10:13:36 am by Kyndo »


Re: Confucianism; How to Understand Korean Culture
« Reply #86 on: July 26, 2021, 01:06:56 pm »
Another important concept in Confucianism, which is huge in Neo-Confucianism (Joseon was a Neo-Confucian revolution), is chung 誠 (정). Chung is all around us in Korea, but the average foreigner has no clue about this value and its thousands of year long history. Chung is one of those concepts that can’t really be translated into English, because English culture doesn’t have the concept…

“The Chinese word chung means not only sincerity in the ordinary sense, but also absence of fault, seriousness, being true to one's real self, being true to the nature of things, actuality, and realness.”—Wingtsit Chan.

This “sincerity” concept is much deeper than the English term, and has to do with the unity between man and nature which is at the heart of Chinese philosophy. From perfect sincerity there is nowhere to run, nowhere to retreat to, because you’re already at your true nature—that’s the highest chung.

Chung comes up all the time in daily Korean life. Last week a dinner group described someone in a positive way referencing their 정, the other week some kid sent me a resume saying he was 성실하다 (comes from 誠實하다), some girls on the subway said 정말? (comes from 正, the Confucian rectification of names; names should correspond to actuality; “really? Yes really!”). BTW, this is why saying things like “you’re fat” to friends and family is considered a virtue (it is “realness,” relevant, not hiding from reality).

Advice: conduct yourself in this manner in Korea, in business and personal matters and you’ll get better results Chung is the solution, and why East Asia is so based.

Mod edit: removed needlessly inflammatory content
I disagree with any kind of deep meaning or philosophy governing the average person's life in the 21st century developed world. Really, only the deeply religious show any kind of commitment to old world philosophies to the point where it governs their behavior. The majority are based on present day entertainments and values and whatnot (although some to the point of it being pseudo-religious).

The average person thinks with their glands 80% of the time, their heart 15% of the time and their head 5% of the time.


Re: Confucianism; How to Understand Korean Culture
« Reply #87 on: July 26, 2021, 01:09:28 pm »
glandular thinking


Re: Confucianism; How to Understand Korean Culture
« Reply #88 on: July 27, 2021, 06:12:50 am »
I disagree with any kind of deep meaning or philosophy governing the average person's life in the 21st century developed world. Really, only the deeply religious show any kind of commitment to old world philosophies to the point where it governs their behavior.

Your disagreement and arguments don’t change reality.

Ruism continues to govern the social interactions happening around us every day (e.g. micro-rites: honorific form and bowing). Just as Western philosophies govern your thinking right now (e.g. saying that other cultures don’t exist, that everything is “modern” now and we have broken with the past, that intellectual argument changes reality).

The ancients live rent free in our heads, guiding our behavior.


Re: Confucianism; How to Understand Korean Culture
« Reply #89 on: July 27, 2021, 06:20:47 am »
romanizing 정 as 'chung' is super ass

Romanization is not really critical to this thread; Chinese philosophy is about actuality not name.

The word is 誠, and it is spelled 誠. English spellings of Chinese characters have been disastrous, see Wade-Giles, so when talking with people who aren’t familiar with the topic I sometimes just use approximate phonetic (which is “chung” pronounced with an uptone).


Re: Confucianism; How to Understand Korean Culture
« Reply #90 on: July 27, 2021, 06:34:36 am »
Mod edit: removed needlessly inflammatory content

It’s interesting mods don’t remove “needlessly inflammatory content” on this site against Asians, but remove it quickly when it offends white sensibilities.

It’s interesting how mods delete trolls posts, yet allow trolls to swarm this thread.

Ask yourselves, why?


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Re: Confucianism; How to Understand Korean Culture
« Reply #91 on: July 27, 2021, 07:22:01 am »
Because some posts are deliberately inflammatory and insulting. Others are just wayyy off topic. The former are deleted whenever possible, the latter... well, those should probably be deleted too, but often they're pretty entertaining, so...  :undecided:

And your accusations of mod racism are laughable.  :laugh:
But... if you *do* find an example of “needlessly inflammatory content on this site against Asians", report it and it will, of course, get deleted.

Meanwhile, maybe dial back your own trolling if you want to be taken even a little bit seriously.  :smiley:


Re: Confucianism; How to Understand Korean Culture
« Reply #92 on: July 27, 2021, 07:46:26 am »
Because some posts are deliberately inflammatory and insulting. Others are just wayyy off topic. The former are deleted whenever possible, the latter... well, those should probably be deleted too, but often they’re entertaining…

As I said, selective enforcement of trolling rules (admitted by a mod).

Next logical question, selective, using what criteria to discriminate? Why is some trolling “entertaining,” while other witty trolling (mine) gets deleted? You don’t think cultural biases and racial fragilities in the mods are determining this? Then what is determining it?

I’m formally asking that troll posts be deleted; consistent enforcement of forum rules.


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Re: Confucianism; How to Understand Korean Culture
« Reply #93 on: July 27, 2021, 08:02:03 am »

The average person thinks with their glands 80% of the time, their heart 15% of the time and their head 5% of the time.

I understand how you believe that 'listening to science' are just hollow words but is this '80% glandular thinking' affected by gender and menopause and do have any evidence to support it?  :laugh:
« Last Edit: July 27, 2021, 09:25:17 am by Adel »


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Re: Confucianism; How to Understand Korean Culture
« Reply #94 on: July 27, 2021, 11:06:28 am »
As I said, selective enforcement of trolling rules (admitted by a mod).

Next logical question, selective, using what criteria to discriminate? Why is some trolling “entertaining,” while other witty trolling (mine) gets deleted? You don’t think cultural biases and racial fragilities in the mods are determining this? Then what is determining it?

I’m formally asking that troll posts be deleted; consistent enforcement of forum rules.
If one was to remove every minor incidence of it (ie off-topic posts, tongue in cheek responses etc) then every forum in the world would be eerily silent. These are very small infractions, and - in my opinion - can be fun to read so long as they don't completely derail a conversation.  :smiley:
Other posts are unpleasant, needlessly combative, and borderline abusive. They contribute nothing, and can alienate casual readers. These have no place in a professional forum such as this one.  :sad:

Deleting insults while leaving banter doesn't involve cultural bias.
If you feel that a comment transcends banter and is offensive, please flag it and leave a brief explanation outlining what the issue is. You'd be helping us out! Reporting TOS violations really is the best way of keeping this site from being overrun by negativity.



Re: Confucianism; How to Understand Korean Culture
« Reply #95 on: July 27, 2021, 11:27:01 am »
I understand how you believe that 'listening to science' are just hollow words but is this '80% glandular thinking' affected by gender and menopause and do have any evidence to support it?  :laugh:
While the specific number maybe off and I'm not sure that "heart" can be studied, science on human behavior, cognition, and perception suggests that yes, we are incredibly driven by our glands.


Re: Confucianism; How to Understand Korean Culture
« Reply #96 on: July 31, 2021, 06:45:06 am »
These are very small infractions, and - in my opinion - can be fun to read so long as they don't completely derail a conversation.

Obviously these trolls have completely derailed the conversation, intentionally.

If one was to remove every minor incidence of it (ie off-topic posts, tongue in cheek responses etc) then every forum in the world would be eerily silent.

I’ve actually seen this done on a forum, and the result was a civil high quality site. The current practice drives high quality posters away from this site, and leaves the career trolls.


Re: Confucianism; How to Understand Korean Culture
« Reply #97 on: July 31, 2021, 06:47:40 am »
Back on topic, who a country puts on its bills says a lot about the culture and what they value…

Faces on Korean bills (1k, 5k, 10k, 50k)…

[From left to right: Neo-Confucian philosopher, Neo-Confucian philosopher, King who made Neo-Confucianism the state ideology, mom of Neo-Confucian philosopher.] #유교


Re: Confucianism; How to Understand Korean Culture
« Reply #98 on: July 31, 2021, 07:01:51 am »
Back on topic, who a country puts on its bills says a lot about the culture and what they value…

Faces on Korean bills (1k, 5k, 10k, 50k)…

[From left to right: Neo-Confucian philosopher, Neo-Confucian philosopher, King who made Neo-Confucianism the state ideology, mom of Neo-Confucian philosopher.] #유교
Things I hear Koreans discuss on a habitual basis: The teachings of Yi Hwang vs. Yi I.


Re: Confucianism; How to Understand Korean Culture
« Reply #99 on: July 31, 2021, 07:36:47 am »
Things I hear Koreans discuss on a habitual basis: The teachings of Yi Hwang vs. Yi I.

Do any of you actually work in the Korean education system, or better yet own a business in this industry? The system is built around the Mencian “water the seed” philosophy of how parents (“tiger moms” as America labeled them) can shape the moral character and abilities of their children. There are genetic limitations in the seed, of course, but a seed can thrive or go bad depending on nurture. Especially you see it in the private academies: hyper-competitive seed cultivation.

This was the philosophy of the guys on these bills, and it’s the current philosophy of moms, who in turn make it the philosophy of their children. As fas as individuals’ intellectual knowledge on this stuff, it varies but is usually fairly low. But in culture things travel outside of intellectual awareness.