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  • stoat
  • The Legend

    • 2087

    • March 05, 2019, 06:36:13 pm
    • seoul
Re: Confucianism; How to Understand Korean Culture
« Reply #20 on: February 22, 2021, 09:39:13 am »
Everything you said pretty much applies to a Jane Austen novel. They're liked because it's new and different and idealized. Just like a lot of other entertainment.

Jane Austin novels are new?


  • 745sticky
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1294

    • March 26, 2020, 01:52:57 pm
    • Korea
Re: Confucianism; How to Understand Korean Culture
« Reply #21 on: February 22, 2021, 09:58:21 am »
Jane Austen novels are liked?


Re: Confucianism; How to Understand Korean Culture
« Reply #22 on: February 22, 2021, 10:06:16 am »
I know people who made bank re-writing Jane Austen novels as parodies, that's how popular they are.

And that's how Pride and Prejudice and Zombies became such a hit (which was hilarious, btw -- the movie was a crapshoot, though).
« Last Edit: February 22, 2021, 10:50:51 am by Chinguetti »


  • stoat
  • The Legend

    • 2087

    • March 05, 2019, 06:36:13 pm
    • seoul
Re: Confucianism; How to Understand Korean Culture
« Reply #23 on: February 22, 2021, 10:38:11 am »
It's no coincidence Bridgerton is set in the same period as Austen's novels


Re: Confucianism; How to Understand Korean Culture
« Reply #24 on: February 22, 2021, 12:50:37 pm »
Jane Austin novels are new?
The world they are in is new to the reader.


  • stoat
  • The Legend

    • 2087

    • March 05, 2019, 06:36:13 pm
    • seoul
Re: Confucianism; How to Understand Korean Culture
« Reply #25 on: February 22, 2021, 12:56:50 pm »
The world they are in is new to the reader.

Parts of it are sure, but Austen's popularity is probably also based on the universality and timeless nature of the message - woman wants to snag a rich, handsome husband


  • starryella
  • Veteran

    • 83

    • November 07, 2019, 04:29:39 pm
    • Busan, South Korea
Re: Confucianism; How to Understand Korean Culture
« Reply #26 on: February 22, 2021, 12:59:19 pm »
Parts of it are sure, but Austen's popularity is probably also based on the universality and timeless nature of the message - woman wants to snag a rich, handsome husband

Emma is in fact about a woman who does NOT want to snag a rich, handsome husband.


  • stoat
  • The Legend

    • 2087

    • March 05, 2019, 06:36:13 pm
    • seoul
Re: Confucianism; How to Understand Korean Culture
« Reply #27 on: February 22, 2021, 01:03:19 pm »
Probably why it's not as popular  :laugh:


  • starryella
  • Veteran

    • 83

    • November 07, 2019, 04:29:39 pm
    • Busan, South Korea
Re: Confucianism; How to Understand Korean Culture
« Reply #28 on: February 22, 2021, 01:04:22 pm »
Such a shame as Emma is my favorite book by Austen, much more original and interesting than Pride and Prejudice.


Re: Confucianism; How to Understand Korean Culture
« Reply #29 on: February 22, 2021, 06:39:49 pm »
Everything you said pretty much applies to a Jane Austen novel.

Since I spend my time reading the classics, which have influenced the behavior of billions of people across thousands of years, I don’t even know this “Jane Austin” of which you all speak. It’s all about opportunity cost.


  • L I
  • Waygook Lord

    • 5854

    • October 03, 2011, 01:50:58 pm
Re: Confucianism; How to Understand Korean Culture
« Reply #30 on: February 22, 2021, 06:51:58 pm »
She’s on the £10 note, (On the back. Queen Elizabeth is on the front.)


  • confusedsafferinkorea
  • Waygook Lord

    • 5688

    • October 08, 2010, 01:02:32 pm
    • Zhubei, Hsinchu County, Taiwan (not part of China)
    more
Re: Confucianism; How to Understand Korean Culture
« Reply #31 on: February 23, 2021, 05:58:51 am »
Since I spend my time reading the classics, which have influenced the behavior of billions of people across thousands of years, I don’t even know this “Jane Austin” of which you all speak. It’s all about opportunity cost.

Terrible to be so ignorant. You accuse us of being ignorant . Pot, kettle, black.
There is no known medical cure for stupidity!


Re: Confucianism; How to Understand Korean Culture
« Reply #32 on: February 23, 2021, 07:02:41 am »
Terrible to be so ignorant. You accuse us of being ignorant .

See relevancy; I’m not living in the West/UK.

To get back on topic, again, we can use this very tangent of the trolls...

In choosing where to invest our reading, it helps to realize there are “thought lineages.” Take some contemporary Western romance author; where did she get her ideas, where did that person in-turn get their ideas? Trace the ideas to their roots. It’s a tree, much like biological evolution, and you can go back to the common ancestor—the roots of Western thought. Or in the case of East Asia a parallel thought lineage with different starting assumptions (in China). So, if one hasn’t read and grasped Aristotle and the Bible first (the roots), it’s just playing around Jane Austen (the leaves) without understanding where they came from. Things have beginnings; Laozi told us that. And beginnings determine trajectories, thus they tell us both the past and probable futures.

It’s all about opportunity cost and there’s an element of strategic ignorance. A person can live in East Asia for years yet remain ignorant on the roots of thought here, nothing is stopping them as we can see from the responses on this thread (“I know nothing about it, but know it doesn’t interest me”). Most people do that, including those born here—although actually the locals study ancient Chinese characters in junior high, and learn some academically about 유교 (because Ruism values education). However there are advantages to deeper knowledge; few read the source texts of their society, just like in the West. Relevant rare knowledge has more value than common irrelevant knowledge.

The other asset of reading the Chinese classics is that it gives a person a way to get out of their bubble (their born into “thought lineage”), unlike reading Jane Austen which is in the bubble. You don’t actually know you’re in a bubble, or the outer shape/color of that object, until you get outside of it. How could you? From outside, with perspective, suddenly you can look back at Western thought and be like “ahhh, it’s a thing.” And it’s just one thing, not the whole world like it arrogantly claims. I don’t see how anyone can ever truly understand the West, without understanding Eastern (or other) thought.


  • stoat
  • The Legend

    • 2087

    • March 05, 2019, 06:36:13 pm
    • seoul
Re: Confucianism; How to Understand Korean Culture
« Reply #33 on: February 23, 2021, 07:40:57 am »
Yes, just finished 'Dominion' by Tom Holland.  It's a long read but gives Westerners a good insight into their heritage. There are probably similar books about Asian culture people can read without having to plough through the original texts.

https://www.amazon.com/Dominion-Christian-Revolution-Remade-World/dp/0465093507

« Last Edit: February 23, 2021, 07:43:40 am by stoat »


  • tylerthegloob
  • The Legend

    • 2182

    • September 28, 2016, 10:46:24 am
    • Busan
    more
Re: Confucianism; How to Understand Korean Culture
« Reply #34 on: February 23, 2021, 07:54:02 am »
so did the tree try to cut off its own branch or how's that mesh with your metaphor? or maybe there was no criticize confucius campaign? or maybe marx was chinese? or maybe i don't know anything because western propaganda got me all confused, maannnnn

anyway since kimchininja likes the classics so much, here's a link to the analects

https://antilogicalism.files.wordpress.com/2017/07/the-analects.pdf  edit: in general you can find lots of great stuff here! check it out :)

can't say reading it has changed my life as much as aristotle or laozi (who is actually interesting) but maybe the analects will open your third eye about korea or whatever
« Last Edit: February 23, 2021, 08:00:12 am by tylerthegloob »
more gg more skill


  • 745sticky
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1294

    • March 26, 2020, 01:52:57 pm
    • Korea
Re: Confucianism; How to Understand Korean Culture
« Reply #35 on: February 23, 2021, 08:22:55 am »
Since I spend my time reading the classics, which have influenced the behavior of billions of people across thousands of years, I don’t even know this “Jane Austin” of which you all speak. It’s all about opportunity cost.

lol


  • stoat
  • The Legend

    • 2087

    • March 05, 2019, 06:36:13 pm
    • seoul
Re: Confucianism; How to Understand Korean Culture
« Reply #36 on: February 23, 2021, 08:27:19 am »
Quote
   
can't say reading it has changed my life as much as aristotle or laozi (who is actually interesting) but maybe the analects will open your third eye about korea or whatever   

I'm guessing you have to learn Chinese first and read it in its original form before you properly comment on its efficacy


Re: Confucianism; How to Understand Korean Culture
« Reply #37 on: February 23, 2021, 11:16:02 am »
Probably why it's not as popular  :laugh:
Is it?

Persuasion was my favorite.
Since I spend my time reading the classics, which have influenced the behavior of billions of people across thousands of years, I don’t even know this “Jane Austin” of which you all speak. It’s all about opportunity cost.
9/10 Billy Goats Gruff. That was some 3-Year Letterman type shit right there.


Re: Confucianism; How to Understand Korean Culture
« Reply #38 on: February 23, 2021, 11:22:56 am »
The other asset of reading the Chinese classics is that it gives a person a way to get out of their bubble (their born into “thought lineage”), unlike reading Jane Austen which is in the bubble. You don’t actually know you’re in a bubble, or the outer shape/color of that object, until you get outside of it. How could you? From outside, with perspective, suddenly you can look back at Western thought and be like “ahhh, it’s a thing.” And it’s just one thing, not the whole world like it arrogantly claims. I don’t see how anyone can ever truly understand the West, without understanding Eastern (or other) thought.
The world has changed so drastically and become so homogenized that to focus on Confucianism is pointless.

At this point marketing and "How to Get Rich on Youtube" is more relevant to the study of human behavior and customs than Plato or Confucious. People are far far far more alike than different in the 21st century developed world.


  • stoat
  • The Legend

    • 2087

    • March 05, 2019, 06:36:13 pm
    • seoul
Re: Confucianism; How to Understand Korean Culture
« Reply #39 on: February 23, 2021, 11:29:32 am »
Quote
   from: stoat on Yesterday at 01:03:19 pm
Probably why it's not as popular  :laugh:
Is it     

Pride and Prejudice 17 (movies) V Emma 6 according to Google.