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Re: Confucianism; How to Understand Korean Culture
« Reply #60 on: July 14, 2021, 10:54:31 am »
I just want to know if it's ok for me to call my 'Cha Gio' spring roll? They do have egg in them and they are quite crunchy but I use a rice flour rapper. Will I be arrested and charged with a food crime if I do this  in America?
Not a crime. Just use the correct term. It's not that hard.

Why anyone thinks the use of spring roll or egg roll in English establishes the provenance of the egg roll being an authentic Chinese dish is beyond me.

Only someone who lacks critical thinking skills and basic comprehension and logic would think that is somehow relevant.

And that's before we get to Panda Express being Chinese food.


Re: Confucianism; How to Understand Korean Culture
« Reply #61 on: July 14, 2021, 11:23:14 am »
Not a crime. Just use the correct term. It's not that hard.

Why anyone thinks the use of spring roll or egg roll in English establishes the provenance of the egg roll being an authentic Chinese dish is beyond me.

Only someone who lacks critical thinking skills and basic comprehension and logic would think that is somehow relevant.

And that's before we get to Panda Express being Chinese food.

Thank you Mr.DeMartino, I often read your posts and trust you but I'm not Chinese I'm Vietnamese.  We sometime translate  our 'cha gio' as egg roll too.  Is this not correct? What is wrong with my critical thinking?


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Re: Confucianism; How to Understand Korean Culture
« Reply #62 on: July 14, 2021, 01:28:21 pm »
if i may answer for the d'tino...
theres only a problem with your critical thinking if you think what we call it in english has any bearing on whether or not its authentic
more gg more skill


Re: Confucianism; How to Understand Korean Culture
« Reply #63 on: July 14, 2021, 02:21:41 pm »
I'm not worried about the authenticity of my food. I just want to know what the correct name is. I don't think Americans would understand cha gio.


  • Adel
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Re: Confucianism; How to Understand Korean Culture
« Reply #64 on: July 14, 2021, 03:03:04 pm »
Another quick one for Marti's new spokesperson. If its 'not that hard' as he says, what is correct in the mind of Marti the great? :laugh:
Shouldn't it be possible to accept either spring roll or egg roll if the English translation is pretty much irrelevant, as Marti's new spokesperson would suggest?


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Re: Confucianism; How to Understand Korean Culture
« Reply #65 on: July 14, 2021, 03:08:58 pm »
speaking for myself (this time)... its not hard to differentiate between what an american would call a hot dog and a corn dog, but if a korean wants to call a corn dog a hot dog, i can't be ****** to correct them

this is how i feel about spring rolls and egg rolls. i dont have a horse in that race though. anyway, i think his other point (which i mentioned in my previous post) is a pretty good one
more gg more skill


Re: Confucianism; How to Understand Korean Culture
« Reply #66 on: July 14, 2021, 03:20:00 pm »
speaking for myself (this time)... its not hard to differentiate between what an american would call a hot dog and a corn dog, but if a korean wants to call a corn dog a hot dog, i can't be ****** to correct them

this is how i feel about spring rolls and egg rolls. i dont have a horse in that race though. anyway, i think his other point (which i mentioned in my previous post) is a pretty good one

Growing up in NZ, a hot dog was either on a stick (usually at a fair) or not on a stick (the fish and chip shop). Both were lightly battered, the same as a fish fillet.  The other style, if you could find one was called an 'American hotdog', the one with the bun and frank etc. I never saw a corn dog until I came to Korea.
Same with an egg roll. I had no idea what one was until that discussion.
« Last Edit: July 14, 2021, 03:24:05 pm by Kurt Sorensen »


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Re: Confucianism; How to Understand Korean Culture
« Reply #67 on: July 14, 2021, 03:23:48 pm »
 but if a korean kiwi wants to call a corn dog a hot dog, i can't be ****** to correct them
more gg more skill


Re: Confucianism; How to Understand Korean Culture
« Reply #68 on: July 14, 2021, 03:27:23 pm »
Thank you Mr.DeMartino, I often read your posts and trust you but I'm not Chinese I'm Vietnamese.  We sometime translate  our 'cha gio' as egg roll too.  Is this not correct? What is wrong with my critical thinking?
Sorry, didn't mean to suggest you had a problem with critical thinking. There's a lot of stuff going on and I wrote the second half of that with Adel and gogators! in mind. I messed up there and I apologize.
 
I understand how regional usage can cause the term to be intermixed when used in English. So there's nothing wrong with that. Just that, for the purposes of the two posters above, the fact that they think the way an egg or spring roll is termed in English has any bearing on its authenticity as a dish demonstrates a lack of critical thinking skills.


Re: Confucianism; How to Understand Korean Culture
« Reply #69 on: July 14, 2021, 03:31:29 pm »
but if a korean kiwi wants to call a corn dog a hot dog, i can't be ****** to correct them

Exactly! Call it what you want. It doesn't really matter to me as well. Beyond a lesson on different food that is nearly the same, or called the same, I'm not interested in correcting 'Joe average' from anywhere.


Re: Confucianism; How to Understand Korean Culture
« Reply #70 on: July 14, 2021, 03:34:02 pm »
Is every thread from now on going to be about egg rolls and spring rolls? I'm too hungry during my desk time to handle this new trend  :cry:


  • Adel
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Re: Confucianism; How to Understand Korean Culture
« Reply #71 on: July 14, 2021, 03:34:24 pm »
Growing up in NZ, a hot dog was either on a stick (usually at a fair) or not on a stick (the fish and chip shop). Both were lightly battered, the same as a fish fillet.  The other style, if you could find one was called an 'American hotdog', the one with the bun and frank etc. I never saw a corn dog until I came to Korea.
Same with an egg roll. I had no idea what one was until that discussion.

I take it you poor folk missed out on the battered sav?



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saveloy


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Re: Confucianism; How to Understand Korean Culture
« Reply #72 on: July 14, 2021, 03:34:52 pm »
All in favour of Waygook NEVER mentioning egg rolls or spring rolls for 6 months, starting today, say aye.


Re: Confucianism; How to Understand Korean Culture
« Reply #73 on: July 14, 2021, 03:36:55 pm »
Aye!         (but I did learn something)


Re: Confucianism; How to Understand Korean Culture
« Reply #74 on: July 14, 2021, 03:39:30 pm »
I take it you poor folk missed out on the battered sav?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saveloy

Never! I make my own. I thought you Aussies were also lovers of the battered sav?


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Re: Confucianism; How to Understand Korean Culture
« Reply #75 on: July 14, 2021, 03:45:42 pm »
Never! I make my own. I thought you Aussies were also lovers of the battered sav?
I do enjoy them, but very seldom these days.  :cry:


Re: Confucianism; How to Understand Korean Culture
« Reply #76 on: July 14, 2021, 03:53:53 pm »
Another quick one for Marti's new spokesperson. If its 'not that hard' as he says, what is correct in the mind of Marti the great? :laugh:
Shouldn't it be possible to accept either spring roll or egg roll if the English translation is pretty much irrelevant, as Marti's new spokesperson would suggest?
It should be possible for you to have enough brainpower to understand that what it's called in English doesn't affect whether or not the dish is Chinese or not.


  • Adel
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Re: Confucianism; How to Understand Korean Culture
« Reply #77 on: July 14, 2021, 03:59:22 pm »
It should be possible for you to have enough brainpower to understand that what it's called in English doesn't affect whether or not the dish is Chinese or not.

So in other words your protracted diatribe on the difference was utterly pointless as usual.
I can agree with you on that one!  :laugh:
« Last Edit: July 14, 2021, 04:08:31 pm by Adel »


Re: Confucianism; How to Understand Korean Culture
« Reply #78 on: July 14, 2021, 04:28:22 pm »
So in other words your protracted diatribe on the difference was utterly pointless as usual.
I can agree with you on that one!  :laugh:
Except you were the one claiming it was important.....You were the one claiming that because it's called "egg roll" by some Chinese person speaking in English, that makes it authentic.

FFS dude, just take the L.


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Re: Confucianism; How to Understand Korean Culture
« Reply #79 on: July 14, 2021, 04:42:51 pm »
Except you were the one claiming it was important.....You were the one claiming that because it's called "egg roll" by some Chinese person speaking in English, that makes it authentic.

FFS dude, just take the L.
Is it any wonder so many posters simply ignore your total bullsh#t?
Marti, you're a legend in your own lunch box. Congrats!