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  • Guillaume1
  • Newgookin

    • 1

    • February 18, 2021, 03:06:53 pm
    • United States
what's the difference between these future forms??
« on: February 18, 2021, 03:20:24 pm »
What time does your meeting start v what time is your meeting starting?
The football kicks off at 3.30 v the football is kicking off at 3.30
John takes his exams next week v john is taking his exams next week.omegle xender
The sun rises at 6 tomorrow v the sun is rising at 6 tomorrow

I cant distinguish between them. Is there any time we'd say one over the other. I think either is ok
« Last Edit: February 25, 2021, 03:55:13 pm by Guillaume1 »


  • stoat
  • The Legend

    • 2068

    • March 05, 2019, 06:36:13 pm
    • seoul
Re: what's the difference between these future forms??
« Reply #1 on: February 19, 2021, 08:58:17 am »
I've seen the present simple form referred to as 'timetable future' used to describe events happening at specific times. It sounds a bit more formal than the present continuous form and probably wouldn't be used to refer to casual arrangements. Thus you would say 'I'm meeting a friend tomorrow night' rather than 'I meet a friend tomorrow night.'


  • starryella
  • Adventurer

    • 68

    • November 07, 2019, 04:29:39 pm
    • Busan, South Korea
Re: what's the difference between these future forms??
« Reply #2 on: February 19, 2021, 09:02:02 am »
I'm not an expert, but that said, I notice some slight differences between some of them in terms of how I'd personally use them.

1. "What time is your meeting starting?" sounds like it is happening more immediately/sooner than "What time does your meeting start?" Assume you have an idea of when their meeting is, but you don't know the exact time. You know it's like, late afternoon for example. I feel like you could ask "What time does your meeting start?" to that person at 8AM and that would make perfect sense. However, if you know the meeting is in the late afternoon and it's currently 8 AM, "What time is your meeting starting?" seems a little off to me. Not WRONG, not impossible to understand, just that to me, there's an implication with this question that it's happening sooner rather than later. I feel like if you're talking to this person at 2:00 the same day, "What time is your meeting starting?" seems a lot more natural. It sort of implies that you know they have to go soon.

2. Similar issue with this one. "The football kicks off at 3:30" is a simple statement of fact that you could say at any time. "The football is kicking off at 3:30" sounds more urgent to me? Like for example, what if you're writing an email to invite someone to a Super Bowl party you are hosting. "The football kicks off at 3:30" would almost certainly be used over "The football is kicking off at 3:30." I guess you could technically make the case for either, but the second one implies more urgency just like I explained in #1. It sort of implies "Don't be late! The football is kicking off at 3:30. You won't want to miss it!" The other one has no sense of urgency, it's just a fact.

3. Strangely, this example doesn't imply any urgency/immediacy to me. Either example, to me, implies the same thing with little difference. As a test, I tried it out as "John takes his exams next August" vs. "John is taking his exams next August" - both sound equally far away to me and I do not get any similar issue as with 1/2 and 4.

4. This one does have a greater sense of immediacy to me. It did not pass the test for number 3. "The sun rises at 6 am in June" vs. "The sun is rising at 6 am in June." It doesn't make sense to say the latter to me in December, but the first one would be fine. The latter is a bit odd/unnatural in general as a sentence, but the only time I could see it being used is in May or June, not some far away month.

Just my two cents, again, not an expert.