Read 1094 times

  • starryella
  • Veteran

    • 83

    • November 07, 2019, 04:29:39 pm
    • Busan, South Korea
Some storybook / reading class lesson plans and worksheets
« on: January 25, 2021, 12:30:16 pm »
I do weekly storybook classes for what is supposed to be the majority of the school year, but last year ended up not running as long due to kids being online for part of the year.

Anyway, I decided I could share some of my resources and lesson plans. I hope this can help some of you.

Most of the below is targeted for grade 4, my students are not overall high-level grade 4s, so if yours are I am sure you will need to make some adaptations. These lessons could possibly be used for grade 3 if you had a higher-level grade 3, though I think 4 is better since they generally are better with writing and reading.

One lesson below is for Grade 6, a special Halloween reading class that I had to prepare. It went great and I think it's difficult to find storybooks that that age group enjoys, so I figured I'd share in case anyone else has to do something similar.

I cannot share the book PPTs that I made, but if you have the books you could make one yourself. I'm sorry about this and wish I could (or I guess I should say that I was brave enough), but while I don't mind sharing worksheets I made for educational purposes, distribution of a full book is rather different so I'll tell you guys the title and give you the other class materials as I am able.

Might need to make a few posts. Book threads will be below. It might take me some time to get through my whole list but I'll post as much as I can.

There are some materials I am not comfortable sharing and I'm sorry about that. I would share them all if I didn't have concerns about distributing full book content, licensed content, etc. but I prefer to be safe rather than sorry. When I use one of those instead I will describe what I did so you could re-create it if you wanted.

Disclaimer to say that all resources posted are for educational use only.
« Last Edit: January 26, 2021, 10:36:47 am by starryella »


  • starryella
  • Veteran

    • 83

    • November 07, 2019, 04:29:39 pm
    • Busan, South Korea
Re: Some storybook / reading class lesson plans and worksheets
« Reply #1 on: January 25, 2021, 12:59:13 pm »
Glad Monster, Sad Monster by Ed Emberley and Anne Miranda
Grade 4

I wasn't looking forward to this book because I didn't think it was a super exciting read, but I ended up being surprised by my class' reaction to it. We had one of our best discussion days with this book and the kids really enjoyed talking about the different emotions.

I planned 3 days for this book and the outlines are below. I'm attaching the PPT which includes the vocab slides, the "Guessing the Feelings" Inside Out video, the memory card game, and instructions in Korean for the play activity. My corona-time classes are 35 minutes, so these plans covered roughly that time period with my classes. Extra worksheet "Today I Feel" activity is included. You could use this whenever, I didn't get to it last year but I like it.

Day 3 maybe you don't want to use, I will definitely adapt this activity this year to be more of a Readers' Theater than a play, but I included what I prepared for last year in case anyone else's kids are more amenable to it.

DAY 1
  • Pre-teach vocab with flashcards
  • Hand out vocab worksheet – students fill in English under Korean
  • Read the story. As we read, after each monster I added a slide to my PPT asking, "What makes you feel sad/angry/frustrated etc?" and we spent a few minutes on that. Some kids were able to use English but some weren't and I can speak some Korean so it was okay for our class to let them use Korean.
    I also had the students write each monster's feeling on the worksheet (bottom section) as we read.
  • Optional: Guessing the Feelings video (link in PPT)
  • Optional: Memory Game

DAY 2
  • Review of vocab and ask students what they remember from last class
  • If you didn't do the Guessing the Feelings video in previous class, do it now as a warmer.
  • “Emotion Worksheet” writing and drawing activity
  • Optional: Bomb game - emotion review (I'm a little uncomfortable to repost mine, but this could be reproduced really quickly/easily using literally any template. Mine was Mario and it included emotion pictures, translate and unscramble activities, for some ideas)
  • Optional: Memory Game if you didn't do it in the last class, or if your students want to do it again

DAY 3
Group acting activity: Fair warning that you have to assess your own kids before taking this activity on. Mine didn't want to do the acting part. Another idea could be group reading (without acting), or turning the book into Readers' Theater. My kids did a lot better with a Readers' Theater we did later in the semester. They preferred that they didn't have to act and that everyone was involved at once.

I cannot upload the doc I used, but basically what I did was 4 panels on one page (make a Word table 2x2). For each monster, I split the text into the 4 boxes (think one box per student) and added a picture from the book that went with the text for the lower-level students' comprehension. The idea was to have them read and act out the emotion and the activity. For example, miming knocking over a block tower and being angry.

  • Assign teams. 1-2 monsters per team. I think 1 is best. It's ok if you don't use all the monsters from the book. Students get the 4-panel printout for their monster and they can split up the parts between each other.
  • Give the kids time to practice their reading with each other. I gave about 10 minutes but if you only give them 1 monster that might be a bit too much.
  • Put on the play as a class with each group coming to the front to act and read their parts.
If you want to do a refresher of the book you could read it again quickly before doing the play activity, but for my class I felt like it was too much.
« Last Edit: January 26, 2021, 10:34:07 am by starryella »


  • starryella
  • Veteran

    • 83

    • November 07, 2019, 04:29:39 pm
    • Busan, South Korea
Re: Some storybook / reading class lesson plans and worksheets
« Reply #2 on: January 25, 2021, 02:10:32 pm »
Bark George by Jules Feiffer
Grade 3/4

A great deal of this lesson was adapted from erinenglish's post here: https://www.waygook.org/index.php?topic=91288.0 but I did make some changes, so I'm posting my files here.

I only spent one day on Bark, George because it's basically just a lesson on animal sounds. The kids liked the lesson, though.

LESSON PLAN
  • Hidden pictures animals primer (on Animal Sounds and Games PPT)
  • Intro to animal sounds - pass out animal worksheet (PDF and word doc attached - PDF is for anyone who doesn't have the fonts). This part continues on with the same PPT, the students should fill in the animal sounds as you go and then color the animals in the appropriate color. I gave the kids a minute to guess the sound since some of them knew some of the sounds already.
  • Read the book.
  • The animals PPT covers a bit of sentence structure that is helpful for the next activity. You can go over it or not. ("What does the ____ say?" "The cat says ____.")
  • Play Ylvis "The Fox" on YouTube and have the kids listen for the sounds. Ask them after one time what sounds they could remember hearing in the song that they learned earlier in the lesson. Play the video again and see if they can find any more. My kids liked when I asked "What does the fox say?" and they got to make silly sounds. We are now old so our kids have never heard this song, and mine got a kick out of the video.
Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jofNR_WkoCE

  • This lesson was quick so I ended up concluding the class with this read-aloud of Bark, George from YouTube.
Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W1x_1INwvzg
« Last Edit: January 26, 2021, 09:44:27 am by starryella »


  • starryella
  • Veteran

    • 83

    • November 07, 2019, 04:29:39 pm
    • Busan, South Korea
Re: Some storybook / reading class lesson plans and worksheets (GRADE 4)
« Reply #3 on: January 25, 2021, 03:06:57 pm »
The Little Old Lady Who Was Not Afraid of Anything by Linda Williams
Grade 3/4

Started Halloween with this book and loved it for my class. 2 days and the focus is on onomatopoeic sounds.

DAY 1
  • Pre-teach vocab with flashcards (clothing items)
  • Warmer with the storybook in song format from this YouTube video that goes at increasing speed. It gets the kids used to the sounds each object made (which was great because I wanted them participating as we read the story). You can use the "Sound Flashcards" attached to help them sing along.
Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BiUflxXF-Zg

  • Read the story together. I asked my students to do the sounds as we went. I would read, "Two shoes go..." and they had to say "CLOMP, CLOMP."
  • Have them complete the sequencing activity on the worksheet (can be done before or after the read)
  • Drawing/writing activity "I'm afraid of..." (I don't think I got a chance to do this with my kids because the book took longer than I thought but something to add in case there is time.)

DAY 2
  • Review with flashcards or replay Little Old Lady song
  • Reader's Theater activity - I simplified the book script and I'll include it here. It's just text and no pictures and I made some changes to make it a little easier for my kids' level. I considered how to assign parts for this - the onomatopoeic parts are the lowest-level and I gave them to my students who struggle with reading, and assigned the more difficult parts to my higher-level students. I saved the hardest part for myself but one student wanted it, so I let her go ahead and she knocked it out of the park! But if you don't have any superstar readers, take the teacher part for yourself so your kids don't struggle. I made cards which I handed out - they are color-coded and attached here. There are two roles for some of the colors. We had a class of 10, so my students got both roles of the same color (very short parts though, so nothing to worry over). You could adjust this based on class size though. For readers' theater, print out a copy of the script for each student. Roles are also color-coded to match their role cards. Read through as a class like you are all doing a first script read for a play.
  • Word search with story vocab if you have the time.
« Last Edit: January 26, 2021, 09:44:04 am by starryella »


  • starryella
  • Veteran

    • 83

    • November 07, 2019, 04:29:39 pm
    • Busan, South Korea
Re: Some storybook / reading class lesson plans and worksheets (GRADE 4)
« Reply #4 on: January 26, 2021, 08:33:34 am »
Spooky Old Tree by Stan and Jan Berenstain
Grade 3/4

Continuing on with the Halloween theme, I actually ended up teaching this to several grades as a general Halloween-themed reading lesson. In my opinion, this book is best suited for 3-4.

This was a book I loved as a kid and it is one of my absolute favorites for ESL. It has the repetition and super-simple, easy-to-understand language for lower grades, but the pictures are gorgeous and the kids thought it was a really exciting spooky read. Even though it's an easy read, it doesn't condescend, if you know what I mean? It's written for younger kids but doesn't have that obvious "this is a baby book" aspect that I find with a lot of books that are English level-appropriate for these grades.

So... originally this class was 2 days and I'll post the plan for 2 days. However, until corona restrictions ease, I think you should hold off on the second day. More info below.

Note: Attached worksheets originally had 2 pictures from below-mentioned TPT side. I removed those so if you use you should either download the material I mentioned at the link below, or find your own via google search.

DAY 1
  • Preteach vocab with flashcards. A note if you are teaching this book for older students (grade 5 and up) - one of the vocabulary words is "shivers." My fifth graders thought this word sounded like... something else in Korean. I basically had to chill out my 5th grade boys saying, "This is English class, think in English, please." If you think your kids won't be able to get over the word "shivers," you could edit the book text to read "chills" or something like that, maybe. I don't think it would ruin the story. It wasn't a huge deal to me and the littler kids didn't have any issues with the word.
  • Read the story together as a class. This story is awesome for class discussion while you read like "What do you see?" "What's this?" - so much to look at in this book.
  • Complete sequencing activity (vocab/sequencing worksheet is attached). I recommend doing this along with the reading as the third graders tend to lose track of order afterwards.
  • Picture bingo game. Yikes, I want to include this but I bought the resource on Teachers Pay Teachers. If you check out this link (https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/The-Spooky-Old-Tree-BOARDMAKER-Bingo-4131096) you can purchase the bingo board. It does take some work - I basically cut the board I downloaded into pieces (individual bingo squares), then moved them in different orders. I made as many boards as I had students, but it took maybe an hour total to make that many different ones, so not terrible I think. I also then pasted each bingo square into a word doc and blew them up so that I could make laminated cards for myself. When we played bingo, I pulled a card from the stack and showed it to the kids, since not all of them know all of this story vocab without a reference. They could look at the picture if they couldn't read/identify the word independently. If we didn't have corona I would have laminated each board to re-use and let them do dry-erase markers, but instead I just printed black and white boards we could throw away. Next year I will do the laminated ones.
  • Word search if you have the time.

DAY 2
Okay, so, this book has a board game that goes with it. I wanted to play the game with my class as it is quite simple but, corona, so we couldn't do an actual board game. I had the horrible idea to try to play a board game on the PPT and it was just bad, so I do not recommend that.

For post-corona, I think this would be AWESOME, though. You can find a picture of the gameboard on Google images. As far as I can tell it is no longer sold as it is now over 30 years old. So if you want to play you can just make your own board. You can use my spooky dice (attached) if you want. Regular dice are also fine, spooky dice are more fun and also remind them when they need to flip over a puzzle piece on the board.

The game is quite simple. You have 4 teams: Light, stick, rope, and key. Each team has a different starting place on the game board but everyone's path is equidistant. They have to go all the way around the gameboard to their team's "home" to win. The gameboard has some special rules:
  • If you land on a space with the same item as your team (e.g., Team Rope lands on the rope picture) they get to skip ahead to the next rope picture on the board.
  • Puzzle pieces can be flipped to either the normal side or the shortcut side (shortcut is yellow with a picture of bears running across it). If the normal side is up then the team approaching the puzzle piece has to go the long way around it. If the shortcut side is up, they can take the shortcut across the puzzle piece and skip several squares. The idea is for the teams to strategize and try to block other teams from using shortcuts, while helping their own by using as many shortcuts as they can.
  • If you land on a puzzle piece picture, you should flip over any puzzle piece on the board.
  • If you roll a 2 or a 4 you also flip a puzzle piece in addition to moving ahead on the gameboard.

Instructions for the game are attached in the PPT here in Korean with pictures. I think this game would be super fun for the kids to play in groups. It would take some prep to make but honestly I think it is worth it. The game reviews some of the key vocab and is just an awesome and topical activity to do with this book.

I really hope I get a chance to use this post-corona because the kids did like the game, it just wasn't interactive enough as a PPT where they couldn't move their own pieces, etc.
« Last Edit: February 15, 2021, 11:00:41 am by starryella »


  • starryella
  • Veteran

    • 83

    • November 07, 2019, 04:29:39 pm
    • Busan, South Korea
Re: Some storybook / reading class lesson plans and worksheets
« Reply #5 on: January 26, 2021, 09:08:02 am »
There's A Wocket in My Pocket! by Dr. Seuss
Grade 4/5

I think this lesson has some language focus that can extend the target age group up to grade 5! I probably wouldn't use this for 3 at all, because I think the concepts are a bit too advanced for total beginners, and my students learn prepositions of location in grade 4.

Two days here, first day is a rhyming focus and second is preposition practice. This went along perfectly with the prepositions (over, under, on) my kids were learning concurrently. All resources included except book as usual. For fonts - you may need to download "Gamja Flower" from Google fonts for the bingo, or just change the title font.

DAY 1
  • Intro to rhyming words (PPT attached)
  • Rhyming practice game
Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JHroOYO1iOo

  • Pre-teach vocabulary with flashcards. Students write vocab definitions on the day 1 worksheet.
  • Read story. Ask students questions about each page - what is the focus object called in Korean?
  • Matching worksheet - students should match the monster to the rhyming word.
  • Drawing activity - students think of another place in a house that a monster could hide. They should draw their monster and give it a rhyming name (e.g., the zable on the table). My kids did an awesome job with this, and it was great practice and also cool to see how English rhyme is interpreted by Koreans - it was actually really challenging for some of them to understand what part of the word makes it rhyme, but most of them did a great job inventing a rhyme.
  • Memory rhyming game (PPT attached)

DAY 2
  • Review vocab with flashcards
  • Review prepositions (in, on, under) and have students write the translation on the prepositions worksheet
  • Re-read story. We did "repeat after me" for the re-read. Students should do the cloze activity on the prepositions worksheet as you read.
  • Check the cloze activity answers.
  • Catch the sentences game. I had them look for the preposition in the sentence specifically, since the nonsense words were a little challenging for some students to read quickly.
  • Picture bingo (teacher bingo flashcards and student boards attached for this one since I made them).
  • Word search if time
« Last Edit: January 26, 2021, 09:43:25 am by starryella »


  • starryella
  • Veteran

    • 83

    • November 07, 2019, 04:29:39 pm
    • Busan, South Korea
Re: Some storybook / reading class lesson plans and worksheets
« Reply #6 on: January 26, 2021, 09:41:46 am »
Creepy Carrots by Aaron Reynolds
Grade 6

Grade 6 resource here! I was tasked with preparing a storybook class for my adolescent students... my first thought was YIKES. At this age, they are definitely too old for most storybooks but their English isn't advanced enough for tween/teen books. Ended up finding this story on YouTube and thought it might be just zany enough to work. It went over great! The kids thought it was so weird that they didn't mind that it was technically a kids' book. They thought the idea of a bunny being stalked by carrots was really funny and we had a lot of fun reading it and doing the activities.

I'm a pretty dynamic/energetic reader so I think that helped and my coteacher translated most of the story as we went. I'm not sure I would attempt this if you don't have a CT who can help translate. The book is a little bit difficult for where they are at - I had to find something on the Halloween/spooky theme and I primarily wanted to find one that they would enjoy. It has some challenging parts - the pictures could help, but I think it's still a little difficult if you can't get ANY translation help. Another option would be to translate it and add clickable translation on the PPT. I have done that before.

All resources attached, there is a PDF of the worksheets in case you don't have the font. Otherwise you can use the word doc, there's no difference.

DAY 1
  • Since it was a Halloween class, I started the day with a 10-minute primer I made about Halloween in my home country (US). Not going to share because it includes personal photos, but obviously the kind of thing you could easily make on your own.
  • Pre-teach vocabulary with flashcards. Have the kids fill in vocab words on the worksheet.
  • Read the book together and invite participation/feedback as you go.  Students should complete the cloze part of the worksheet by writing in vocab words as you come to them in the story. I added numbers on the PPT to remind myself to tell them to write the word.
  • You might not think it but this took our entire class period. Before we left the class, my CT primed the kids for the next class by telling them they would be drawing/designing a creepy creature. We asked them to think of an everyday object that they could make spooky, and explained that they would be writing a small backstory/description about what made it spooky.

DAY 2
  • Quick vocab review.
  • Design a creepy creature. We jumped right in and had them do the drawing activity. It was awesome and they did a great job.
  • Mad-Libs style activity! I wrote a template for this and they have to fill in words to make a weird story about a haunted/creepy object. I gave them a list of a bunch of nouns/adjectives/verbs since it is hard for my kids to come up with them otherwise. The higher-level students added their own and the lower-level ones chose words from the worksheet. These were a lot of fun and I really enjoyed their stories. I showed them an example first and I'm attaching that, but you should obviously black out or replace my name on the example unless your name is also Teacher Ella.
« Last Edit: January 26, 2021, 09:57:48 am by starryella »


  • starryella
  • Veteran

    • 83

    • November 07, 2019, 04:29:39 pm
    • Busan, South Korea
Re: Some storybook / reading class lesson plans and worksheets
« Reply #7 on: January 26, 2021, 10:14:18 am »
Winnie the Witch by Valerie Thomas and Korky Paul
Grade 3/4

This is actually one of the books/plans from my Harry Potter camp I did over the summer, so it's a little less dynamic/involved than some of the other lessons here, since it wasn't supposed to be a stand-alone lesson. However, I feel like I make nice resources/worksheets so I wanted to post some of them to help out. You could always add a game or additional activities - I'm probably going to re-teach this in my Reading Club class this year, and if I add resources I'll update the lesson plan.

I only chose a handful of vocab words from the book for the camp since I intended to also teach some magic/HP themed ones, so you would need to choose your own vocab list for this book.

I did my camp with both grades 3 and 4 and their level is quite different, so I included totally separate activities for each grade, differentiated in the plan.

Please note: PDFs are attached but you need a special font to use the Word docs. You can download the "Miss Kindergarten" font from this website: http://www.kimberlygeswein.com/
I am sorry but I can't remember exactly where the Korean font came from. It is called "We Make Price" and I found it through like a Hangeul Day free font blog post. You can just change it to something else if you need to edit the document or you can search for it online if you're really ambitious.

LESSON PLAN
  • Pre-teach vocab. I think Line Bingo is great for vocab practice and would probably do it with Grade 4 (my Grade 3 struggles with it).
  • Read story.
  • Grade 3: Students complete sequencing activity (cut/paste). Then they can color the picture of Wilbur and label the right colors for his body parts. This is basically review from the colors lesson so this would be a great activity to do around the same time your kids are doing that in class.
    Grade 4: Students complete comprehension question worksheet and the cloze activity worksheet. Once complete, go over the correct answers to the worksheet and have the whole class read the cloze worksheet aloud together.
  • I will probably create a game or additional activity to add to this when I do the official class.
« Last Edit: January 26, 2021, 10:20:20 am by starryella »


  • starryella
  • Veteran

    • 83

    • November 07, 2019, 04:29:39 pm
    • Busan, South Korea
Re: Some storybook / reading class lesson plans and worksheets
« Reply #8 on: January 26, 2021, 10:29:46 am »
This is it for now. I think I'm going to be continuing with this class this year, so I will add resources as they are available, although I cannot promise it will be speedy. I am planning to add Green Eggs and Ham for sure and maybe The Very Hungry Caterpillar.

I also did a lesson on We're Going on a Bear Hunt but unfortunately the number of resources I could actually upload for this is so small I feel like it is not even helpful.

All of the lessons above were a success with my classes and I've let you know where I had issues for the most part so you know what to change.

If anyone has questions feel free to send me a PM. Please don't ask for the book PPTs though as I'm not comfortable distributing that content. I know it takes a ton of time to make them but these resources took a lot of time too. I probably spend about 12 hours on every lesson between making the book and planning/creating all the resources so please understand that. Almost all of this is stuff I made myself from scratch and I just wanted to help someone else save the time. I felt quite lost when I started doing these classes so I thought this would be a helpful start to anyone else who has to do something similar to get some ideas and just not have to make some resources.
« Last Edit: January 26, 2021, 10:35:07 am by starryella »


Re: Some storybook / reading class lesson plans and worksheets
« Reply #9 on: January 27, 2021, 07:46:37 am »
These resources look amazing, thank you for sharing!  :smiley: