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Re: Answers to burning questions we have about Korea
« Reply #80 on: December 11, 2020, 09:30:44 am »
I mean yeah, that's always going to be the case. Especially when you consider that recent generations grew up with the internet while our older relatives didn't

Older generations have proven incredibly adept at catching up with current technology.



Image credits/ Mister Tim
« Last Edit: December 11, 2020, 09:32:27 am by Don Hobak »


  • confusedsafferinkorea
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Re: Answers to burning questions we have about Korea
« Reply #81 on: December 11, 2020, 09:42:07 am »
Older generations have proven incredibly adept at catching up with current technology.

Actually many of the 'older generation' can teach the youngsters a thing or two about modern technology. 

I often read that Koreans were the most tech savvy people in the world and I think if you go deeper into that claim it simply meant they were good at social media. If you asked them about the more complicated things their phone or computer could do then you probably would be met with a blank stare.
There is no known medical cure for stupidity!


  • hangook77
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Re: Answers to burning questions we have about Korea
« Reply #82 on: December 11, 2020, 09:56:13 am »
Older generations have proven incredibly adept at catching up with current technology.

Actually many of the 'older generation' can teach the youngsters a thing or two about modern technology. 

I often read that Koreans were the most tech savvy people in the world and I think if you go deeper into that claim it simply meant they were good at social media. If you asked them about the more complicated things their phone or computer could do then you probably would be met with a blank stare.

Actually, I use to find several years ago that many older and middle aged folks would study and focus intensely on one or two key areas and outside of that were almost dumb on general knowledge about other things.  (Though with many that is changing somewhat.  It seemed more like the older generation in some ways.) 


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Re: Answers to burning questions we have about Korea
« Reply #83 on: December 11, 2020, 10:23:55 am »
I went to Catholic schools, we had religion class. The Protestants, and there were a few, got sex-ed.

Truth....


Re: Answers to burning questions we have about Korea
« Reply #84 on: December 11, 2020, 10:30:46 am »
Older generations have proven incredibly adept at catching up with current technology.

Actually many of the 'older generation' can teach the youngsters a thing or two about modern technology. 
Older gen often had first hand experience with the innards of electronics, either from necessity or their job. Youngins? Nowhere near as much.

Ajumma ran the arcade I used to visit and every time a machine went down she'd fix it, not some hired geek squad dweeb.


  • oglop
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Re: Answers to burning questions we have about Korea
« Reply #85 on: December 11, 2020, 11:11:14 am »
are arcades current tech? most of the ones i've seen have machines that are 20+ years old


Re: Answers to burning questions we have about Korea
« Reply #86 on: December 11, 2020, 01:05:20 pm »
are arcades current tech? most of the ones i've seen have machines that are 20+ years old
Fair point on that.


  • Kyndo
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Re: Answers to burning questions we have about Korea
« Reply #87 on: December 11, 2020, 01:31:34 pm »
are arcades current tech? most of the ones i've seen have machines that are 20+ years old

My favourite arcade game by far, and which I've spent more time and money on than I'd care to admit after a fun night out with friends, is DDR.
It saddens me that when I wikied it, I discovered that, yeah, DDR arcade machines are 20+ years old.  :cry:

The other game that I often gravitate to is 1945, which is maybe the classic, gold standard for all arcade games. It kinda shocked me to find out that it's only 2 years older than DDR!


  • Mr C
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Re: Answers to burning questions we have about Korea
« Reply #88 on: December 11, 2020, 02:18:50 pm »
Older generations have proven incredibly adept at catching up with current technology.



Image credits/ Mister Tim

I must say I'm lookin' pretty good in that photo.  Lost some weight, I think.


Re: Answers to burning questions we have about Korea
« Reply #89 on: December 11, 2020, 08:44:23 pm »
I must say I'm lookin' pretty good in that photo.  Lost some weight, I think.

First rule of internetting, old man: never out yourself on online forums! Címon, you saw what happened to CO2. Perhaps the weight loss can be attributed to all that time spent on the DDR machine during your trips with Marty to Jeong Ajummaís Arcade Palace. Iím surprised he didnít warn you about the perils of being doxxed then.

And why your desk would be on castors but your desk chair not is beyond me.


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Re: Answers to burning questions we have about Korea
« Reply #90 on: December 11, 2020, 11:14:12 pm »
...
And why your desk would be on castors but your desk chair not is beyond me.

You only need to move one, and having the wall behind you:

1) prevents people from seeing your porn sensitive or personal data you may be working on, and
2) makes a better Zoom background.


Re: Answers to burning questions we have about Korea
« Reply #91 on: December 12, 2020, 12:50:08 am »
First rule of internetting, old man: never out yourself on online forums! Címon, you saw what happened to CO2. Perhaps the weight loss can be attributed to all that time spent on the DDR machine during your trips with Marty to Jeong Ajummaís Arcade Palace. Iím surprised he didnít warn you about the perils of being doxxed then.


  • 303lmc
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Re: Answers to burning questions we have about Korea
« Reply #92 on: December 15, 2020, 09:42:19 am »
my question earlier was WHY do they  top and butcher trees here? I heard the buzz of chainsaws all day  yesterday at the school, which is next to my apartments. they totally butchered the once beautiful trees. I had seriously considered staying just one more year, but that was a clear message to GTFO!!


  • Kyndo
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Re: Answers to burning questions we have about Korea
« Reply #93 on: December 15, 2020, 10:25:12 am »
Perhaps the weight loss can be attributed to all that time spent on the DDR machine during your trips with Marty to Jeong Ajummaís Arcade Palace.
What? Mr.Demartino and Mr. C do DDR as well?  :shocked: Fantastic! We should all totally do a Waygook DDR party!


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Re: Answers to burning questions we have about Korea
« Reply #94 on: December 15, 2020, 10:52:48 am »
Why don't they put fluoride in the toothpaste?


  • OnNut81
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Re: Answers to burning questions we have about Korea
« Reply #95 on: December 15, 2020, 11:31:02 am »
Why don't the big supermarkets have the check out counters that have the swiveling bar, so when one person is packing their groceries they can just swivel the bar and the next person's items go into a separate area?  People are always on top of each other at the check out counters because they never wait until you're done before they start ringing up the next person's stuff.  Seems like a pretty straightforward and well known solution. 


  • 303lmc
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Re: Answers to burning questions we have about Korea
« Reply #96 on: December 15, 2020, 11:56:05 am »
Why don't the big supermarkets have the check out counters that have the swiveling bar, so when one person is packing their groceries they can just swivel the bar and the next person's items go into a separate area?  People are always on top of each other at the check out counters because they never wait until you're done before they start ringing up the next person's stuff.  Seems like a pretty straightforward and well known solution. 
agreed. and yet the parking lot for the market is super hi tech, lights over each parking spot indicating if its open or not, red or green.


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Re: Answers to burning questions we have about Korea
« Reply #97 on: December 15, 2020, 12:05:59 pm »
Perhaps the weight loss can be attributed to all that time spent on the DDR machine

I learned what DDR really means the hard way


  • hangook77
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Re: Answers to burning questions we have about Korea
« Reply #98 on: December 15, 2020, 12:50:47 pm »
Post a question or quote a person's post with any answer you might have.

Question
Why do so many cars have heavily tinted windows? Do they think it'll prevent the skin from darkening?

Question
Why do schools open for 2 weeks in early February? I've asked and never got a universal/straight answer. A few changes to the system and some proper scheduling could easily manage an uninterrupted holiday period.

Question
Why do people spit? I've heard numerous reasons (it helps prevent cancer while smoking etc.) but never one universal theory. I'm guessing nobody really knows and Korean teenagers simply do it to emulate adults.

Question
Why does every school need a principal and vice principal? One of my elementary schools has a total of 40 students and I've heard of ones with fewer. Do we really need a VP and principal to run such a small school?


Tinted windows were originally to save face.  No one s\could see a younger person or an older person.  Though ajossis drove black cars and women drove white.  Younger people drove silver.  Also a tiny matiz hatchback had to give way to a BMW or a black grandeur as you had to give way to your senior.  Not being able to see the driver allowed you to hide your shame or something like that.  This was years ago the hierarchy which also applied to the road.  It's also why police use to not pull people over.  Because the ajossi told the cop he was older than him and how dare he pull him over.  If the ajossi was friendly or knew the head of the police, the younger cop could get reprimanded.  Formula for corruption.  Confuscianism taken to the extreme.  It is changing a lot now.  Much of this going out the window.  But some habits remain.  Being anonymous or hidden while driving still plays a role.

The two weeks in February is dumb and should just be the first week or two of January tacked onto the school year.  But it was originally to check the kids homework assigned over the holidays.  Then spring vacation the last two or three weeks of Feb was for resting.  I usually take my vacation during this time though some schools restrict it for some dumb reason. 

When you have flem or other things or stomach acid or whatever, spitting gets rid of it rather than keeping it in and swallowing it.  Clears the nasal and throat passages better.  Spicy food can cause stomach acid and a kind of mucus and smoke or even allergies from dust or whatever.  Westerners aren't immune to this.  But folks spit here a lot less than they use to.  Korea not the smokers paradise it once was. 

In the countryside when I was there over a decade ago, small middle schools only had a principal and no support or admin staff.  The teachers had a low teaching workload so they had to split the duties up amongst themselves.  Teachers liked it due to less stress and some slackness (IE their principal might let them sit during class or go for a walk in the afternoon around the area).  Why elementary does it, I have no idea.  But the administration of the schools are broken into two categories at the local and provincial office.  Middle and High school together.  Elementary is it's own separate division and the two don't communicate with each other.  To be honest I have only worked elementary the last 3 or 4 years in a bigger city.  I did middle before that exclusively and a bit of both in the country but mostly middle with a little High School. 

I am stumped on that one.  Different bureaucracy and reporting systems.  Even many of the teachers don't associate with each other.  Sometimes we had meetings at the education office where a bunch of co teachers had to come.  The Elementary and Middle teachers largely stayed in their own groups even there in a social setting. 


  • OnNut81
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Re: Answers to burning questions we have about Korea
« Reply #99 on: December 15, 2020, 12:52:44 pm »
agreed. and yet the parking lot for the market is super hi tech, lights over each parking spot indicating if its open or not, red or green.

In comparison to back home, the parking lots are probably the nicest parts of the supermarkets here.  I was always perplexed when Walmart was leaving Korea, Koreans would say that Walmart just didn't understand the Korean shopper.  They didn't like the bare bones feel of the stores.  EMart hasn't changed a thing with the look of the former Walmart at Pyeongcheon station.  It still looks like crap.  The only nice supermarket I've been to in Korea was a Kim's Club in the Bucheon bus terminal building.  All the others are fine, just very utilitarian.  No high ceilings letting in the natural light for example.  They have all the warmth of a laboratory. 

So, to keep in the spirit of things I will ask a burning question:

Why do Koreans hate nice supermarkets so much?