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Re: Are Coupang rewards worth the hassle?
« Reply #20 on: September 09, 2020, 01:22:03 pm »
Well, G Market, Amazon, I Herb, and others don't do this.  Just easier to buy from them rather than jump through their hoops. 
I generally buy of ol Gmarket as well. Mostly because the stuff I buy there are once every 3-6-12 month staples like bulk paper towels and whatnot that I just pay by phone. Me personally I think straight phone by Smile Pay is the easiest without fooling with the cards. Just punch in my pin and it's done. I don't know if Coupang has something like that or not.

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AS for delinquint, well I am sure there were Koreans who did the same.
True, but it's hard for them to do anything about it when you're overseas. At least with Koreans they have SOME recourse, though I'm sure there are some Koreans who do this but they live in the Philippines or wherever.

I think Samsung Card doesn't require any balances, but I might be wrong. But they're also AMEX. That can be a major boo, though they are accepted globally at the places that take AMEX.

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  • JNM
  • The Legend

    • 4552

    • January 19, 2015, 10:16:48 am
    • Seoul, South Korea
Re: Are Coupang rewards worth the hassle?
« Reply #21 on: September 09, 2020, 01:25:16 pm »
...  But I got a hassle when I tried years ago.  Also the cards had low limits and the balances were non revolving (which defeats the whole purpose of a credit card).  It is easier to get cards nowadays the last few years I have heard.  ...
It isn’t so much a waygookin thing as a “no credit rating” thing. A new arrival making just over minimum wage wouldn’t get a credit card in most countries.

After a year in Korea, I asked my bank manager about it, and drew attention to the amount of money I had ran through his branch. (I was doing consulting work as a sole proprietor, so all my business and personal expenses (rent, car, insurance) were paid to me directly as part of my rate.) He was happy to approve a card with a high enough limit to use for family vacations without worry.

As for overseas use, you need to specify that. It isn’t the default for most Korean cards.

I know a British guy who worked for Visa in Korea. He couldn’t understand, even as a high level manager at Visa, why foreign cards don’t always work here. He tried to fix it, but was stone-walled.
« Last Edit: September 09, 2020, 02:21:05 pm by JNM »


  • hangook77
  • The Legend

    • 2027

    • September 14, 2017, 09:10:12 am
    • Near Busan
Re: Are Coupang rewards worth the hassle?
« Reply #22 on: September 10, 2020, 12:00:40 pm »
It isn’t so much a waygookin thing as a “no credit rating” thing. A new arrival making just over minimum wage wouldn’t get a credit card in most countries.

After a year in Korea, I asked my bank manager about it, and drew attention to the amount of money I had ran through his branch. (I was doing consulting work as a sole proprietor, so all my business and personal expenses (rent, car, insurance) were paid to me directly as part of my rate.) He was happy to approve a card with a high enough limit to use for family vacations without worry.

As for overseas use, you need to specify that. It isn’t the default for most Korean cards.

I know a British guy who worked for Visa in Korea. He couldn’t understand, even as a high level manager at Visa, why foreign cards don’t always work here. He tried to fix it, but was stone-walled.

I was into my second year and I made quite a bit above minimum wage.  Minimum wage full time worker made around 800,000 won a month.  I was at 2.1 in my first year, up from 1.9 in my first.  New Korean teachers were starting at 1.8 and got 100k a month raise each year.  Quite a few of them had cards.  I also had a phone and internet bill in my name for over a year.  I even knew a Korean who had a "friend" issuing cards.  Even with this connection, I couldn't get one.  I knew a couple of foreigners who had one.  But they got lots of rejections before getting a company to take a chance on them.  But they had lots of restrictions such as low limits, non revolving balances, and could not use in a foreign country - restricted. 

As a side note, my country town at the time, the minimum marriageable income that a local woman would marry a guy was 1.5 million won.  (Koreans were not love oriented or attraction oriented at the time.  Status, position, money, etc mattered more back then.)  Anyways, I was well above minimum wage.  I could probably get one recently, but non revolving balances and low limits are still a problem I hear.

I think some of those merchants must be doing something illegal not accepting VISA.  VISA is VISA and is suppose to be accepted anywhere's.  But sometime you get an asshole who won't take the foreign card.  So, I either don't buy from them and take my business elsewhere or if I have to purchase fuel and they pull that bs on me, I never go back there again.  I will say that 95% of merchants here will still take all VISAs because they want the business and to make money. 

(Though I will make the odd purchase from Coupang from bank account simply because there is something I really want or need.  But my spending is small.)
« Last Edit: September 10, 2020, 12:04:47 pm by hangook77 »


Re: Are Coupang rewards worth the hassle?
« Reply #23 on: September 10, 2020, 12:41:14 pm »
It took me some shopping around to get a card here in Korea. I went to my bank of 5 years and they flat out said no. Went to KB and they also said no. Went to KEB and they said no. Went to a different KEB branch and got a Visa credit card no problem. All of that was when I had an F6 visa and a job making 2.9.......

Heard of a teacher who had a credit card and went to renew it when it expired and she was told foreigners can't have credit cards.....


Re: Are Coupang rewards worth the hassle?
« Reply #24 on: September 10, 2020, 01:02:40 pm »
I got a bit lucky. I banked, and still do,  with shinhan before it was Shinhan (can't remember the old name). About 2000, I went in and asked for a VISA card. They just said okay, fill out the forms and gave me a 1.000.000 won limit. That was it. For the last 20 years I've been waiting for them to cancel it. I just keep renewing it and they keep increasing my limit.
As for Coupang points, my wife cashed ours in today for an indoor grill.


  • OnNut81
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1313

    • April 01, 2011, 03:01:41 pm
    • Anyang
Re: Are Coupang rewards worth the hassle?
« Reply #25 on: September 10, 2020, 01:20:15 pm »
 A few months before my Lotte Card expires they sent me a new one and just said once I used it the old one would be deactivated.  I didn't have to call and register it as by signing for it that's what I had done.  When I switched it to the Korean Air one just a few months later they sent the new one again, same procedure and the expiry date was again extended.  Even if Lotte no longer makes it easy for P.S. teachers I'd imagine I'm grandfathered in at this point.  My question is what happens if P.S. positions are cut with the next budget and I take a break for a few months.  Is my card tied to my visa?  I'd still be keeping my place here. 


  • JNM
  • The Legend

    • 4552

    • January 19, 2015, 10:16:48 am
    • Seoul, South Korea
Re: Are Coupang rewards worth the hassle?
« Reply #26 on: September 10, 2020, 04:58:18 pm »
A few months before my Lotte Card expires they sent me a new one and just said once I used it the old one would be deactivated.  I didn't have to call and register it as by signing for it that's what I had done.  When I switched it to the Korean Air one just a few months later they sent the new one again, same procedure and the expiry date was again extended.  Even if Lotte no longer makes it easy for P.S. teachers I'd imagine I'm grandfathered in at this point.  My question is what happens if P.S. positions are cut with the next budget and I take a break for a few months.  Is my card tied to my visa?  I'd still be keeping my place here. 
Not sure about Korea, but most places once you have a relationship with the lender, they look more at your history with them, not external sources.


  • hangook77
  • The Legend

    • 2027

    • September 14, 2017, 09:10:12 am
    • Near Busan
Re: Are Coupang rewards worth the hassle?
« Reply #27 on: September 16, 2020, 12:45:10 pm »
Not sure about Korea, but most places once you have a relationship with the lender, they look more at your history with them, not external sources.

I had bad credit in Canada for a few years, years ago.  I had a TD VISA before my credit went bad.  At least in Canada, the bank cards grandfathered you in.  I had a low 500 dollar limit and it never went up though.  There was a 2 or 3 year period where they sent me a card yearly and renewed it each year, then went back to 3 years.  Ironically the bad credit fell off my credit report after I came to Korea.  As I spent on it and used it and paid it off, the credit limit shot up fast.  Also had RBC offer me a card online and TD also offered me a line of credit.  Think they listed me as a teacher (but prob thought in Canada not here).  Once that bad credit came off, they really got lovey dovey to me.    (Though in recent years, banks have gotten more strict about being overseas with giving new credit and credit limit increases I think.) 

But, the point is the bank did keep renewing me without any credit limit increases so long as I didn't default on them.  I let everything go except this card.  I did have some coworkers at the time who had credit go bad and they had store cards that did get cut up when they tried to use them.  Stores not only have high interest rates but also seem to be more hardass.  They didn't default on these cards but the stores didn't want to take chances.  But the banks no problem.  I also think bankruptcy and default laws are different depending on which Canadian province you live in. 

I had another friend default on 50K of debt.  But his credit was going bad due to losing a job.  So, he went and bought some other stuff before it went bad.  (His bad.  At least I didn't do that.  Ha ha.)  He did seek bankruptcy whereas I didn't.  I had calls from collection agencies and he did till the bankruptcy went through.  I picked up my friend's phone one time to a very rude collection agent and pretended to be Luigi from Italia who didn't know much English.  I offered him a pizza pie if he relax-uh!  Jack went to Italia for  a month apparently and I took his place.  Call ended with a "Thank you; come again!" 

Ah, youthful memories.....