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  • Swervy96
  • Adventurer

    • 69

    • February 08, 2019, 07:09:51 am
    • Incheon, South Korea
Re: Are Koreans rude and cold?
« Reply #60 on: June 25, 2020, 02:42:13 pm »
Well that was an anti-climax  :sad:
I just don't have the energy to argue the logic of people should move to a place they'll hate... I'm sorry :(


  • Liechtenstein
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1354

    • February 15, 2019, 04:39:00 pm
    • NE Hemisphere
Re: Are Koreans rude and cold?
« Reply #61 on: June 25, 2020, 02:42:57 pm »
What's wrong with pointing out things you don't like about the country you live in? Who cares where "home" is? I have no designated "home". I was born in Canada but feel no more Canadian than a Korean who can speak a bit of English and would love to visit The Great White North someday.

It is perfectly legitimate to call out things you don't like about a place you live in. This entire 'if you don't like it leave' is infantile and denotes a subtle racism in itself as in, you are not a _____ therefore you cannot express a negative opinion regarding ______. That's crap.

I totally get it if you are on vacation. If you are vacationing in a place for 1 or 2 weeks and have nothing nice to say, leave. However, if you live there, pay bills and taxes, you have every right to badmouth it as does any national.


  • Colburnnn
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1183

    • August 10, 2015, 05:52:37 pm
    • South Korea
Re: Are Koreans rude and cold?
« Reply #62 on: June 25, 2020, 02:45:21 pm »
I don't hate it here... Don't know what to tell ya! Sorry!

And totally agree LIC.
Haven't you got some pictures of birds to be jacking off to, son?

Colburnnn: Complains a lot, very sassy. Has a loudmouth.


  • Liechtenstein
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1354

    • February 15, 2019, 04:39:00 pm
    • NE Hemisphere
Re: Are Koreans rude and cold?
« Reply #63 on: June 25, 2020, 02:48:14 pm »
I just don't have the energy to argue the logic of people should move to a place they'll hate... I'm sorry :(

How could someone possibly know they will hate a place if they've never been there?

There's another side here too. It's called responsibility. You move to a place, let's call it Korea, you sign a contract for 1 year and 6 months later hate the place. Provided nothing untoward is happening, like your boss is sexually harassing you for example, it's just a general I hate it here, it behooves you to stick it out.

So you stick it out for a further 6 months, all the while excoriating everything about the country, then leave.


  • Liechtenstein
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1354

    • February 15, 2019, 04:39:00 pm
    • NE Hemisphere
Re: Are Koreans rude and cold?
« Reply #64 on: June 25, 2020, 02:53:44 pm »
I don't hate it here... Don't know what to tell ya! Sorry!

And totally agree LIC.

Yeah man, I get it. I made a 5 year promise to my Korean co-teacher provided I was treated with respect. I was and I fulfilled my promise. But, after 5 years I was overdue by about 8 months to get the heck out. It helps I lived and taught in a seriously scenic and beautiful spot on the ocean. I simply hate winter and cold weather. Too many years in Canada. I've been gone for years now and still communicate half regularly with folks I worked with. Some have been to visit me and my wife and we plan a vacation back in Korea as soon as the virus shitshow is finished.


  • Swervy96
  • Adventurer

    • 69

    • February 08, 2019, 07:09:51 am
    • Incheon, South Korea
Re: Are Koreans rude and cold?
« Reply #65 on: June 25, 2020, 02:55:49 pm »
I don't know why you think i'm talking about only you still when I clearly said before I wasn't.

And I agree with you LIC, people should 100% fight for positive change, like I said before.
I'm referring to the people who move here and literally complain about every. single. thing. every. day. on forums.
I don't understand how you can't understand that...


  • Swervy96
  • Adventurer

    • 69

    • February 08, 2019, 07:09:51 am
    • Incheon, South Korea
Re: Are Koreans rude and cold?
« Reply #66 on: June 25, 2020, 02:57:05 pm »
I 100% understand and agree with you LIC, still pretty sure we are just talking about different types of people..

I have met and seen plenty of people complain a shit ton about Korea and how much it sucks, but choose to renew again just to repeat another year of it for the hell of it.
« Last Edit: June 25, 2020, 02:59:14 pm by maclarent1337 »


  • Kyndo
  • Moderator LVL 1

    • 1955

    • March 03, 2011, 09:45:24 am
    • Gyeongsangbuk-do
Re: Are Koreans rude and cold?
« Reply #67 on: June 25, 2020, 03:05:57 pm »
Would a long list of the things I love cheer you up?
I'm feeling a bit blue, and it would certainly cheer me up!  :smiley:


  • Liechtenstein
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1354

    • February 15, 2019, 04:39:00 pm
    • NE Hemisphere
Re: Are Koreans rude and cold?
« Reply #68 on: June 25, 2020, 03:11:44 pm »
I 100% understand and agree with you LIC, still pretty sure we are just talking about different types of people..

I have met and seen plenty of people complain a shit ton about Korea and how much it sucks, but choose to renew again just to repeat another year of it for the hell of it.

Yeah man, I'm with you there. If you've been complaining for months why would you sign a new contract. That, I don't get. I didn't become disgruntled until my 5th contract was about 3 months in or so. It was my last one as had been planned. So I put my head down and got on with it coupled with the requisite bitching and complaining.

I was asked to stay by the school, my CT and the local Office of Ed. I politely told them I had enjoyed myself but I had had enough of Korea and would leave while I had pleasant memories because if I stayed I'd be bitter. They got it and thanked me for my professionalism and honesty. I'd worked with the same people for 5 years and we got along well. They admitted Korea can be challenging, even for them from time to time.


  • Colburnnn
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1183

    • August 10, 2015, 05:52:37 pm
    • South Korea
Re: Are Koreans rude and cold?
« Reply #69 on: June 25, 2020, 03:15:55 pm »
I'm feeling a bit blue, and it would certainly cheer me up!  :smiley:

Sorry to hear that kyndo! I'm blue too. Someone deliberately misquoted me today and I was really upset, they still have not apologised for it either :(( TT

This is my last post as I'm going home now and don't touch waygook.org outside of work hours, but I promise I'll give you a list tomorrow ok? Cheer up. Tomorrow is Friday, Friday, getting down on Friday. And you know Friday Waygook is the best Waygook. :)))

CU! CB. x
Haven't you got some pictures of birds to be jacking off to, son?

Colburnnn: Complains a lot, very sassy. Has a loudmouth.


Re: Are Koreans rude and cold?
« Reply #70 on: June 25, 2020, 05:19:46 pm »
Jesus, every day people are crying on here about how horrible Koreans are lmao
Tbf it depends on the age a lot as well. Most of the rude Koreans are over 50 years old. Very few of the young people in Korea are mean. But sadly, a lot of the older ones are



Re: Are Koreans rude and cold?
« Reply #71 on: June 25, 2020, 11:26:44 pm »
wait. if you are invited out with a group of people and they spend the whole night talking in a language you don't understand -- knowing you don't speak this language -- you just put it down to "oh well i can't expect them to cater to me 24/7"? and you don't consider this behaviour rude?
You were invited out by a bunch of Saffers with you as the guest of honor? They were already planning something and they invited you along? What exactly was the situation here? Or was this more like you were invited out for drinks with a Saffer coworker, he got texted/called up a friend, then that guy invited a mutual acquaintance or something and suddenly it's 5 Saffers and you? Was it a big group and with 5 Saffers and 5 non-Saffers and for 10 minutes the Saffers had the temerity to speak in another language? Or did a Saffer coworker say he was going to watch Rugby or Cricket or whatever because SA was playing and as a "polite" gesture he asked if you wanted to come and shocker, at The Workshop, during an SA match, they all spoke Afrikaans. Totally unforseen.

Have you ever thought about not being butthurt over them speaking Afrikaans or, gasp!, you trying to be proactive during all of this? If you've got any kind of smooth in you, you can find a way to join in. But I guess you don't have that.


Re: Are Koreans rude and cold?
« Reply #72 on: June 25, 2020, 11:52:31 pm »
I asked him that before and he didn't reply. If pushed, he's going to say that it's OK for a few minutes, which I think most people would agree with.

It all boils down to how long they speak it for. I assume you would think it rude if they spoke in Afrikaans all night?

Depends on the setting and how you ended up there. As someone who hung out with a bunch of different groups and people of a different background, it's just something you learn how to roll with, being the only goy at dinner.

I do know that in some cases, subcultures might invite you out because the person who invites you wants to see if you can blend well because they like hanging out with you, but aren't sure if you'll be able to handle the setting. Can you prove out? If you're just going to bulldoze your way through it and try and make yourself the center of attention or if you're just going to silently sulk and eventually leave, then yeah, you just couldn't hang.

Tips, not jsut Saffers, any bilingual subgroup in general:
1) Know your crowd. Get a sense for how people play off of each other. Friendly insults? Tall tales? Words of loyalty? Do people take turns? Is it active and back and forth? Are there age dynamics? Is it serious? Is it casual? 
1b) Know a bit about their culture. Know a few major cities, what sports are big and what teams, some history, a musician or movie, more obscure cuisine, anything. The more you know, the better the chance you pick up on something.
2) Don't try and dominate it and harsh people's buzz
3) Ask the person next to you whatsup, but not in a pleading way, be like you're trying to figure things out with something like "So did he (f) her in the butt or did she (f) him in the butt?" Usually that'll cause a time out, dude next to you will share and everyone has a big laugh. And then you can start in with some of the back and forth. You could be completely off but the fact that you were trying to follow things (point out gestures he made or some word) and the fact that you suggested something totally wacky that makes everyone laugh is always a good in. Try and toss in a word or three you pick up.
4) Ask what slang words me, as you're talking there's plenty of opportunities where you can mid-sentence ask something like "what's the Italian for Red Card/derby/some other sports term" or some lewd slang or alcohol or whatever.
5) It's better to hold and say something really good, than say many things that get no reaction.

Seriously, it's so easy to hang out with a group of other people who are all speaking a different language and not only get by, but actually have a good time, make new friends, and get invited back again. And guess what, suddenly you're comfortable in that situation. It doesn't even phase you. You won't even notice that everything's in a different language.


  • VanIslander
  • Moderator LVL 1

    • 2278

    • June 02, 2011, 10:12:19 am
    • Seogwipo, Jeju Island
    more
Re: Are Koreans rude and cold?
« Reply #73 on: June 25, 2020, 11:58:50 pm »
It has been said numerous times that a key difference between Koreans and the Japanese is that you know where you stand with Koreans: their emotions/attitudes are quickly and easily seen, not hidden behind a facade of politeness and lies.


  • Cyanea
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1368

    • September 04, 2016, 01:48:24 pm
    • Las Vegas
Re: Are Koreans rude and cold?
« Reply #74 on: June 26, 2020, 12:07:54 am »
Most of the rude Koreans are over 50 years old. Very few of the young people in Korea are mean. But sadly, a lot of the older ones are

Isn't that just an illusion that takes hold as you get older?

Koreans that are younger than you.. are not going to be mean to you because you're older.  Whereas Koreans that are older than you..aren't going to have any qualms about putting you in your place.

Over time this gives the impression that the younger generation is more polite.

wait. if you are invited out with a group of people and they spend the whole night talking in a language you don't understand -- knowing you don't speak this language -- you just put it down to "oh well i can't expect them to cater to me 24/7"? and you don't consider this behaviour rude?

Its obviously rude, yes, especially because they invited you along in the first instance.

A lot of it is insecurity, this is where you need to understand the history of the afrikaans. They like to bond together at the expense of the nearest outsider or english speaker because they are taught to bear a grudge from the boer war. So if one of them speaks to you in english they can be viewed as going soft by the others, a traitor on some level.

its a bit like the way Koreans were 20 years ago. They would not even speak to outsiders if they could possibly avoid it and if one did then they got ostracized and criticized  by other koreans. 

You were invited out by a bunch of Saffers with you as the guest of honor? They were already planning something and they invited you along? What exactly was the situation here? Or was this more like you were invited out for drinks with a Saffer coworker, he got texted/called up a friend, then that guy invited a mutual acquaintance or something and suddenly it's 5 Saffers and you? Was it a big group and with 5 Saffers and 5 non-Saffers and for 10 minutes the Saffers had the temerity to speak in another language? Or did a Saffer coworker say he was going to watch Rugby or Cricket or whatever because SA was playing and as a "polite" gesture he asked if you wanted to come and shocker, at The Workshop, during an SA match, they all spoke Afrikaans. Totally unforseen.

Have you ever thought about not being butthurt over them speaking Afrikaans or, gasp!, you trying to be proactive during all of this? If you've got any kind of smooth in you, you can find a way to join in. But I guess you don't have that.

I agree with oglop in this instance though because afrikaans behave like the french or quebequois. ie they have a sense of historical resentment that they lost out to the English. This chip on the shoulder means they always have something to prove.

Afrikaans are famous for their clique-ishness and herd mentality. Go to South Africa for a while, you'll understand. Very likely you won't be sticking up for them after the experience.


Catch my drift?


  • VanIslander
  • Moderator LVL 1

    • 2278

    • June 02, 2011, 10:12:19 am
    • Seogwipo, Jeju Island
    more
Re: Are Koreans rude and cold?
« Reply #75 on: June 26, 2020, 12:37:05 am »
its a bit like the way Koreans were 20 years ago. They would not even speak to outsiders if they could possibly avoid it and if one did then they got ostracized and criticized  by other koreans.
Were you here in 2000?

I have been here for 18 years and I found Koreans MORE likely to talk to foreigners back then. We were an obvious novelty. They pointed, they gasped, they stared AND they tried hard to talk to us. These days we are a dime a dozen, rarely get a surprised look, often are left to our lonesome, making us feel less like a rockstar and more normal. I have had numerous conversations with other foreigners about this aspect of living here.


  • Cyanea
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1368

    • September 04, 2016, 01:48:24 pm
    • Las Vegas
Re: Are Koreans rude and cold?
« Reply #76 on: June 26, 2020, 01:37:47 am »
Were you here in 2000?

I have been here for 18 years and I found Koreans MORE likely to talk to foreigners back then. We were an obvious novelty. They pointed, they gasped, they stared AND they tried hard to talk to us. These days we are a dime a dozen, rarely get a surprised look, often are left to our lonesome, making us feel less like a rockstar and more normal. I have had numerous conversations with other foreigners about this aspect of living here.

No I wasn't.. but that was my basic impression of Koreans met outside the country. .
Catch my drift?


  • oglop
  • The Legend

    • 4626

    • August 25, 2011, 07:24:54 pm
    • Seoul
Re: Are Koreans rude and cold?
« Reply #77 on: June 26, 2020, 06:23:14 am »
Depends on the setting and how you ended up there. As someone who hung out with a bunch of different groups and people of a different background, it's just something you learn how to roll with, being the only goy at dinner.

I do know that in some cases, subcultures might invite you out because the person who invites you wants to see if you can blend well because they like hanging out with you, but aren't sure if you'll be able to handle the setting. Can you prove out? If you're just going to bulldoze your way through it and try and make yourself the center of attention or if you're just going to silently sulk and eventually leave, then yeah, you just couldn't hang.

Tips, not jsut Saffers, any bilingual subgroup in general:
1) Know your crowd. Get a sense for how people play off of each other. Friendly insults? Tall tales? Words of loyalty? Do people take turns? Is it active and back and forth? Are there age dynamics? Is it serious? Is it casual? 
1b) Know a bit about their culture. Know a few major cities, what sports are big and what teams, some history, a musician or movie, more obscure cuisine, anything. The more you know, the better the chance you pick up on something.
2) Don't try and dominate it and harsh people's buzz
3) Ask the person next to you whatsup, but not in a pleading way, be like you're trying to figure things out with something like "So did he (f) her in the butt or did she (f) him in the butt?" Usually that'll cause a time out, dude next to you will share and everyone has a big laugh. And then you can start in with some of the back and forth. You could be completely off but the fact that you were trying to follow things (point out gestures he made or some word) and the fact that you suggested something totally wacky that makes everyone laugh is always a good in. Try and toss in a word or three you pick up.
4) Ask what slang words me, as you're talking there's plenty of opportunities where you can mid-sentence ask something like "what's the Italian for Red Card/derby/some other sports term" or some lewd slang or alcohol or whatever.
5) It's better to hold and say something really good, than say many things that get no reaction.

Seriously, it's so easy to hang out with a group of other people who are all speaking a different language and not only get by, but actually have a good time, make new friends, and get invited back again. And guess what, suddenly you're comfortable in that situation. It doesn't even phase you. You won't even notice that everything's in a different language.


"I do know that in some cases, subcultures might invite you out because the person who invites you wants to see if you can blend well because they like hanging out with you, but aren't sure if you'll be able to handle the setting. "

you hang out with some strange people. but it still sounds like you're ok with hanging out with a group of people who invited you out and ignore you for the whole night. nothing says "i like you" than refusing to speak to you for the entire night.

anyway, thanks for the tips on how to socialise, rainman


  • stoat
  • The Legend

    • 2087

    • March 05, 2019, 06:36:13 pm
    • seoul
Re: Are Koreans rude and cold?
« Reply #78 on: June 26, 2020, 06:51:38 am »
Bizarre. Tips on how to make friends with people who ignore you all night. It reads like instructions for a spy or an undercover police officer whose mission is to infiltrate the group. Most people aren't that desperate.
« Last Edit: June 26, 2020, 06:55:42 am by stoat »


  • tylerthegloob
  • The Legend

    • 2058

    • September 28, 2016, 10:46:24 am
    • Busan
    more
Re: Are Koreans rude and cold?
« Reply #79 on: June 26, 2020, 07:01:20 am »
don't touch waygook.org outside of work hours

thats one thing we can agree on. also i'm patiently awaiting your list
more gg more skill