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  • VanIslander
  • Moderator LVL 1

    • 1831

    • June 02, 2011, 10:12:19 am
    • Seogwipo, Jeju Island
    more
Re: Biggest Change to Korea since you've been here?
« Reply #40 on: June 14, 2020, 08:48:00 pm »
-Have KPop truly be global and one group in particular dominating fandom and have that fandom be a key member of a massive global protest movement
A key member of WHAT global protest movement?

Please don't think BTS' one million donation to an anti-racist organization qualifies. Michael Jordan donated one hundred million.

Quote
-Have the word 'mukbang' enter the popular vernacular
Muk wha? .. popular Korean vernacular perhaps, not English.

Quote
-Be major force on the cosmetics scene
It's a $429 billion industry that Korea hasn't even a five percent share of!!!!

 It's an industry dominated by L'Oreal, Estee Lauder, Unilever, Proctor & Gamble, Johnson & Johnson, Coty, Beiersdorf and two Japanese companies: Shisheido and Kao Corp. Korea has four of the top 100 countries in the industry for a total of $6.8 billion in 2018, meaning all four companies together have less than 3% of the global market. Pff. That is not a major force, except IN Korea, and a few pocket-sized markets in Southeast Asia.
« Last Edit: June 14, 2020, 08:50:05 pm by VanIslander »


  • T.J.
  • Veteran

    • 226

    • June 09, 2011, 11:07:16 am
    • 서울 은평구 연신내
Re: Biggest Change to Korea since you've been here?
« Reply #41 on: June 14, 2020, 11:11:11 pm »
If you had told the old timers that Korea would
-Bloodlessly remove a president through mass popular peaceful protest
-Be a global leader in fighting the biggest pandemic in a century
-Win Best Picture at the Oscars
-Have the biggest children's song in the world
-Have KPop truly be global and one group in particular dominating fandom and have that fandom be a key member of a massive global protest movement
-Have the word 'mukbang' enter the popular vernacular
-Be major force on the cosmetics scene

They would have called you crazy and said that could NEVER happen here.


I usually like your posts but this one is way off.

I came in ‘91 because Uncle Sam told me to. In ’93 I returned after separation specifically because of the potential I had observed here.

Since you have started this by telling us what we thought at the time please do tell what your thoughts of Korea’s potential were in 1991.
"An ignorant person is one who doesn't know what you have just found out."

"Diplomacy is the art of saying 'Nice doggie' until you can find a rock."

-Will Rogers


  • Cyanea
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1346

    • September 04, 2016, 01:48:24 pm
    • Las Vegas
Re: Biggest Change to Korea since you've been here?
« Reply #42 on: June 15, 2020, 12:00:18 am »
What's the biggest change to Korea that you have noticed since you've been here?

Mine is the change in tobacco culture, when I first moved to Korea you could literally smoke any and everywhere including stores. Now it seems you can't smoke any where.


Change has come largely due to the gradual vanishing of the xenephobic Park Chung Hee generation.  In the early 2000's they  held this country in the palm of their hands.


One change has been mens fashion. It used to be that men all wore the same conservative brown or dark coloured pants, dress shoes and sensible shirts. it was like being in the 1950's. But now even the old guys wear sneakers and T-shirts.


Another change- koreans go to the gym. This is recent, korean men used to all be skinny, short  and unhealthy-looking. They smoked all the time and exercise was limited to hiking the mountains sometimes. Nowadays though a lot of young people spend time working out.





Catch my drift?


Re: Biggest Change to Korea since you've been here?
« Reply #43 on: June 15, 2020, 12:42:42 am »
Since you have started this by telling us what we thought at the time please do tell what your thoughts of Korea’s potential were in 1991.
I should have said "many old-timers". You know, the bitter haters. That was lazy of me not to make the distinction. There are some old-timers who did think this place had potential and have had positive experiences and are genuinely happy at these events.

Please don't think BTS' one million donation to an anti-racist organization qualifies. Michael Jordan donated one hundred million.
The Stans came out and started taking over every anti-BLM hastag that started popping up. They really were a force. In addition to the money BTS donated, the fans themselves donated significant amounts on their own.

Quote
Muk wha? .. popular Korean vernacular perhaps, not English.
Actually Mukbang has become a thing globally on youtube. Take a look. Biggest Mukbangers in the U.S. have subs in the millions, have product lines, and get shit sent to them by major corporations.

Quote
It's a $429 billion industry that Korea hasn't even a five percent share of!!!!

 It's an industry dominated by L'Oreal, Estee Lauder, Unilever, Proctor & Gamble, Johnson & Johnson, Coty, Beiersdorf and two Japanese companies: Shisheido and Kao Corp. Korea has four of the top 100 countries in the industry for a total of $6.8 billion in 2018, meaning all four companies together have less than 3% of the global market. Pff. That is not a major force, except IN Korea, and a few pocket-sized markets in Southeast Asia.
In raw numbers, which also include really mundane household items, sure. However in TRENDS, they are.


  • stoat
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1398

    • March 05, 2019, 06:36:13 pm
    • seoul
Re: Biggest Change to Korea since you've been here?
« Reply #44 on: June 15, 2020, 06:54:50 am »
Quote
I should have said "many old-timers". You know, the bitter haters. That was lazy of me not to make the distinction. There are some old-timers who did think this place had potential and have had positive experiences and are genuinely happy at these event

I'd guesstimate most normal old timers were probably happy at some of these events, (e.g. greater democracy, Oscar for best movie , dealing with the pandemic) indifferent at some (greatest kid's song (is that Gagnam style you're talking about by the way? If not you missed a trick) cosmetics industry)  and maybe even a touch scornful of others (growth of crappy pop music, people stuffing their faces for a living on youtube) You know, kind of like the same way they like and dislike things that their own country has achieved in that period.
« Last Edit: June 15, 2020, 07:12:37 am by stoat »


Re: Biggest Change to Korea since you've been here?
« Reply #45 on: June 15, 2020, 07:13:55 am »
Some great posts so far, Titus's a particular beauty.  From reading them, you can really see the difference from how much Seoul and the big cities have changed and developed and how little the countryside has, which I suppose is the same in most countries. 

Maybe 10 years ago, a student I was tutoring didn't have to take the seneung, and got accepted to university early like in early-October early. Which meant she was in coasting mode. So the last few months of school she was so relaxed, and enjoying life... lol

Seems to be the preferred choice these days especially as more students are going down the 수시 route mean they have less stress and pinning things on a one-off test.  Also universities are offering more courses with the school record/interview path, which is great.  My high school 4 years ago, it was 80/20 favour of the uni test.  Then it went 60/40, then a couple of years ago 40/60 and last year it was 15/85 in favour of the interview.  I had third grade classes in the second semester and the 수시 students had pretty much built a camp on the floor and were just talking, playing games and eating snacks all day.  Then you had the 5 or so students trying to study for the uni test in the classroom.  Really stupidly thought out.  They should have set up some quiet classrooms only for those students.  But they couldn't do it apparently. 

I was racking my brains over the weekend and there were a few more things.  More so for the countryside.

I used to be able to go with my friends on a Saturday to the train station 20 minutes before a train left, and get train tickets with a seat, anywhere.  And even then the trains were a half/three-quarters full.  Now, if you haven't got your ticket by Weds/Thurs for the Saturday, you'll be standing.  I suppose with apps and online tickets it makes it easier to get them. 

Also, the climate.  It's the same in other countries too I suppose with global warming.  We joke about Koreans saying they have 'four seasons' but they did pretty much.  I remember the warm 'yellow sand' springs with the occasional awful day, but generally healthy days for going out and enjoying the spring.  I remember some days when I'd look outside and the air was real orangey/ red.  Then you'd have a monsoon season with rain I'd never seen the like of before.  Days and days of downpours.  A proper monsoon.  I'd always go out when it stopped to see the damage, but it had all but flowed away.  Then the long humid summers, with nice hot days for going to the beach.  Moving into the beautiful cool autumn.  Then you'd have a proper winter with at least a few weeks of decent deep settling snow.  Now, we have pollution all year around.  We had a decent monsoon 3 years ago, but that was the first for a very long time.  Summer warmth stretches longer into September and October.  Winter has been crap for years.  Last year, there were two days of 'snow', which melted by the afternoon. 

Was it around 2010 when they introduced writing questions into exams?  Before that it was 100% multiple choice, and it's slowly changed from 90/10 to 60/40 weightings.  I still get calls from old co-teachers who ask me questions about student's answers in the writing section.  This is one area where native teachers are still needed just for the sheer variation of what students can write, and I've only worked with a couple of teachers whose English is good enough to mark these properly ro smart enough to keep the answer as narrow as possible.  There are always the students who go to their hagwon teacher if they feel they should be getting some points for their answer.  Then they come to school or get their parents to raise the issue with the teacher.  The amount of times the Korean teachers love saying 'Oh, the native teacher said it's wrong'.  End of discussion.  And anyway, it's all a bit weird considering the uni test is still 100% multiple choice for English, right? 


  • OnNut81
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1185

    • April 01, 2011, 03:01:41 pm
    • Anyang
Re: Biggest Change to Korea since you've been here?
« Reply #46 on: June 15, 2020, 08:08:11 am »
If you had told the old timers that Korea would
-Bloodlessly remove a president through mass popular peaceful protest
-Be a global leader in fighting the biggest pandemic in a century
-Win Best Picture at the Oscars
-Have the biggest children's song in the world
-Have KPop truly be global and one group in particular dominating fandom and have that fandom be a key member of a massive global protest movement
-Have the word 'mukbang' enter the popular vernacular
-Be major force on the cosmetics scene

They would have called you crazy and said that could NEVER happen here.


HaHa, the notorious Korea hating bogeyman strikes again. Good God, you are such a tortured soul.  I had a good laugh reading this when I came in.  Was anyone really knocking Korea to set you off? And I thought Baby Shark was an older public domain song that Pink Fong got a hit with on YouTube.  Anyways, good for them.  I use Pink Fong versions of the story times for my grade 3 classes.  Never heard the word mukbang.

Foreigners have it much easier and less interesting today.  That's my old timer view. 


Re: Biggest Change to Korea since you've been here?
« Reply #47 on: June 15, 2020, 08:37:06 am »
Yeah, not to be a Nitpicky Nellie, but Pink Fong didn't invent "Baby Shark." They did help popularize it, though.

Anyway, I have nothing to really add that won't be outshone by what you old guys have to offer, haha.

But another piddly observation: pets. There are so many more Koreans with pet dogs now. When I first got here, I rarely saw Koreans walking dogs. If and when I saw a dog, it was normally kept chained to a very short leash, and also usually looked pretty terrible. While I still see this, I'm seeing a lot more dog owners properly caring for and interacting with their pets, and taking them out for walks. Also, it used to be all small poodles and pomeranians and the occasional corgi, but now I'm seeing a lot of other breeds, including larger ones.

French bulldogs, huskies, and malamutes seem to be getting a lot more popular lately.


  • Lazio
  • Super Waygook

    • 346

    • January 27, 2018, 03:56:10 pm
    • Gyeongi-do
Re: Biggest Change to Korea since you've been here?
« Reply #48 on: June 15, 2020, 10:03:44 am »
Also, the climate.  It's the same in other countries too I suppose with global warming.  We joke about Koreans saying they have 'four seasons' but they did pretty much.  I remember the warm 'yellow sand' springs with the occasional awful day, but generally healthy days for going out and enjoying the spring.  I remember some days when I'd look outside and the air was real orangey/ red.  Then you'd have a monsoon season with rain I'd never seen the like of before.  Days and days of downpours.  A proper monsoon.  I'd always go out when it stopped to see the damage, but it had all but flowed away.  Then the long humid summers, with nice hot days for going to the beach.  Moving into the beautiful cool autumn.  Then you'd have a proper winter with at least a few weeks of decent deep settling snow.  Now, we have pollution all year around.  We had a decent monsoon 3 years ago, but that was the first for a very long time.  Summer warmth stretches longer into September and October.  Winter has been crap for years.  Last year, there were two days of 'snow', which melted by the afternoon. 

Must be happening all over the World but since we are here, we can notice the changes here. Although I remember the winters back home were a lot colder and a lot snowier when I was a child.
My first 2-3 winters in Korea were cold af. Like around -10 degress Celsius or colder for a 5-6 week period, every single day. You don't see that any more. A cold spell comes that lasts for 2-3 days and the temp. goes back up. Funny how many of my younger students say their favorite season is winter. When I ask why, the answer is always: Snow. So I ask them when was the last time they saw a decent snowfall that didn't melt by mid-day and was enough to make a good sized snowman. Then they start thinking really hard and realize that what they said was rather silly.
And the monsoon has been getting weaker and weaker. Even almost completely absent in recent years. When I first came her it was downright scary at times. Pouring all day like a waterfall. Now you maybe see that kind of intensity for 10-20 minutes and it eases into a regular rain. 


  • OnNut81
  • Hero of Waygookistan

    • 1185

    • April 01, 2011, 03:01:41 pm
    • Anyang
Re: Biggest Change to Korea since you've been here?
« Reply #49 on: June 15, 2020, 10:16:52 am »
Must be happening all over the World but since we are here, we can notice the changes here. Although I remember the winters back home were a lot colder and a lot snowier when I was a child.
My first 2-3 winters in Korea were cold af. Like around -10 degress Celsius or colder for a 5-6 week period, every single day. You don't see that any more. A cold spell comes that lasts for 2-3 days and the temp. goes back up. Funny how many of my younger students say their favorite season is winter. When I ask why, the answer is always: Snow. So I ask them when was the last time they saw a decent snowfall that didn't melt by mid-day and was enough to make a good sized snowman. Then they start thinking really hard and realize that what they said was rather silly.
And the monsoon has been getting weaker and weaker. Even almost completely absent in recent years. When I first came her it was downright scary at times. Pouring all day like a waterfall. Now you maybe see that kind of intensity for 10-20 minutes and it eases into a regular rain. 

I miss those big rains.  First time I experienced it I ran for shelter and thought I would just wait it out.  Had no idea it could rain that hard for that long.  It was great going to check out those shallow calm rivers that are everywhere.  You understood why they had banks and bridges when the monsoon hit.  Those were raging torrents.  There were mudslides with fatalities at times and subway entrances on an incline (Gangnam Exit 8, now 12 I think) were blocked with sandbags to keep the water out.